TnT: How to PC Stream outside of your home network by Gungrave
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[b]*UPDATE 06/18/14*[/b] This guide is now deprecated. Nvidia has created a much simpler in house solution found here: https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/764435/tips-and-tricks/tnt-shield-gamestream-on-the-go-guide/ [quote="NismoTime"] I figured out a really easy way to do it without it clearing the old experience. 1. Download the http://www.geforce.com/drivers/results/70184 331.82 drivers. 2. Install the 331.82 drivers as a clean install(it replaces whatever drivers you have currently) 3. Once it's done, open the geforce experience and go to Preferences. 4. Select Updates and uncheck the box that says Geforce Experience under Other software. 5. Once this is done, click the drivers tab and check for updates. 6. Once the driver is downloaded, select the custom install button. 7. Notice it is installing everything except the geforce experience. 8. Select install driver and there you go! done. You can download and install any new or beta drivers without replacing the experience by using the experience itself. Hope this helps.[/quote] [b]TUTORIAL[/b] I have compiled an easy – non technical step by step guide for setting up PC Game Streaming outside of your home network. This does not require a VPN, so any shield user should be able to do this assuming they meet the requirements below. This tip was created by "cgutman" over on the xda forums. All credit goes to him at [url]http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2435481[/url]. [b]REQUIREMENTS:[/b] A) The connection at the PC location must have at least 5 mb/sec upload. In order to test your connection, go to [url]http://www.speedtest.net/[/url]. For example, my connection has 39.23 mb/s UL rate. [IMG]http://www.speedtest.net/result/2981959711.png[/IMG] B) The distance you are streaming away from your PC must not exceed 50 - 100 miles. For distances that exceed 100 miles, the impact of latency will make games unplayable. You should also have a download rate of at least 5 mb/sec at the location you are streaming from. [b]INSTRUCTIONS:[/b] 1)The first thing that needs to be done is to install the “shield proxy” app on shield. This app is not listed in the google store, so it needs to be downloaded on your shield from the following URL. Log onto this forum thread with the shield, and click this link to get to the download page. Get the latest version at [url]https://github.com/cgutman/ShieldProxyAndroid/releases[/url]. Click on the green button, “ShieldProxy.apk”. [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/b8vbsl.jpg[/IMG] Once downloaded, launch “ShieldProxy.apk”. If you are prompted with a screen saying “install blocked” as shown in the image below, follow along with the next step. If not you may skip the next step. [IMG]http://i40.tinypic.com/jsyuys.jpg[/IMG] The Nvidia Shield security settings by default will prevent it from running unknown apps. Click “settings” on the “install blocked” message. Scroll down and check the following box, “Unknown Sources: Allow installation of apps from unknown sources” as shown below. [IMG]http://i42.tinypic.com/33onlee.jpg[/IMG] You should now be able to successfully install the app. Once the app is installed, we can move on to installing the windows proxy on your computer. 2) The first piece of software you need to download on your computer is “WinPcap”. This allows the computer to capture and transmit network packets. The download link is here: [url]http://www.winpcap.org/install/[/url]. Simply download the program on your Geforce PC for WinPCap, and then run the installer. [IMG]http://i43.tinypic.com/29ymsxy.jpg[/IMG] 3)Now before we can install the last piece of software, you need to make sure the correct ports on your router are forwarded . Log onto your router by opening up a web browser, and typing the ip address that your router is located at. By default, most routers are located at “192.168.1.1”. [IMG]http://i44.tinypic.com/ifvbdk.jpg[/IMG] You will then be prompted to enter a user name and password. If you are unsure, the default username/password combinations for a router are usually: USER: admin PASSWORD: admin USER: admin PASSWORD: password If neither of those work, locate your router and check the bottom/side of it to see if there is a preset login/password printed on a label. If not, you may have to hard reset the router to revert back the default password. [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/w215j7.jpg[/IMG] Once logged into the router, you will need to locate the “port forward” menu. Every router is different, so I do not have a guide to show where exactly it is located. If you are having trouble finding it, I recommend googling “how to port forward with {enter router name here}” . Once you find the menu, you will need to forward the following ports: UDP: 47998, 47999, 48000, 5354 TCP: 35043, 47989, 47991, 47995, 47996 On my router, this looks like the following: [IMG]http://i42.tinypic.com/24ctclz.jpg[/IMG] 4) The second piece of software needed is the shield proxy for windows. This is the program that listens to the shield proxy app on the shield. Download the latest version on your Geforce PC at: [url]https://github.com/cgutman/ShieldProxyWindows/releases[/url]. Download “shieldproxy.zip” and extract it in the desired location you want to run it. [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/14bsy1z.jpg[/IMG] 5) That’s pretty much it for the installation, now we need to get everything working together. Anytime you would like to stream away from the house, you first need to run “ShieldProxy.exe” on your Geforce PC. This is the application that we downloaded in the last step (step 4). Launching “ShieldProxy.exe” will show the following command window below: [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/148ncx3.jpg[/IMG] Do not close this window out, it needs to be open to listen for data from the shield. If you receive the window’s firewall message, make sure both public and private network boxes are checked to ensure all data is passed through. Now launch the “shield proxy app” on the shield that was downloaded in step 1. Launching the app will show the following screen: [IMG]http://i42.tinypic.com/11m999t.jpg[/IMG] The only thing you need to do is to enter your external IP address of your Geforce PC. If you not sure what that is, click on the following link with your Geforce PC [url]http://www.whatsmyip.org/[/url]. Enter that IP Address on the first line in the app, and leave the second line as “5354”. [b]DEMO:[/b] Now that everything is setup, it is time to test it out. Make sure “ShieldProxy.exe” is running on your Geforce PC. Connect to a foreign WIFI network (any network that is not your home network) with the shield. Open up the “shield proxy app” on the shield. Click the grey “start” button. While it is active, you will see and icon pop up in the android tray at the top as shown below. [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/11v1p9z.jpg[/IMG] You should now be able to stream as normal. Push the Nvidia button to bring you into the tegrazone, and connect to your home PC. Enjoy! [IMG]http://i39.tinypic.com/ww10g6.jpg[/IMG]
*UPDATE 06/18/14*

This guide is now deprecated. Nvidia has created a much simpler in house solution found here:

https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/764435/tips-and-tricks/tnt-shield-gamestream-on-the-go-guide/









NismoTime said:
I figured out a really easy way to do it without it clearing the old experience.

1. Download the http://www.geforce.com/drivers/results/70184 331.82 drivers.
2. Install the 331.82 drivers as a clean install(it replaces whatever drivers you have currently)
3. Once it's done, open the geforce experience and go to Preferences.
4. Select Updates and uncheck the box that says Geforce Experience under Other software.
5. Once this is done, click the drivers tab and check for updates.
6. Once the driver is downloaded, select the custom install button.
7. Notice it is installing everything except the geforce experience.
8. Select install driver and there you go! done. You can download and install any new or beta drivers without replacing the experience by using the experience itself.

Hope this helps.


TUTORIAL

I have compiled an easy – non technical step by step guide for setting up PC Game Streaming outside of your home network. This does not require a VPN, so any shield user should be able to do this assuming they meet the requirements below. This tip was created by "cgutman" over on the xda forums. All credit goes to him at http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2435481.

REQUIREMENTS:

A) The connection at the PC location must have at least 5 mb/sec upload. In order to test your connection, go to http://www.speedtest.net/.

For example, my connection has 39.23 mb/s UL rate.

Image

B) The distance you are streaming away from your PC must not exceed 50 - 100 miles. For distances that exceed 100 miles, the impact of latency will make games unplayable. You should also have a download rate of at least 5 mb/sec at the location you are streaming from.

INSTRUCTIONS:

1)The first thing that needs to be done is to install the “shield proxy” app on shield. This app is not listed in the google store, so it needs to be downloaded on your shield from the following URL. Log onto this forum thread with the shield, and click this link to get to the download page. Get the latest version at https://github.com/cgutman/ShieldProxyAndroid/releases. Click on the green button, “ShieldProxy.apk”.

Image

Once downloaded, launch “ShieldProxy.apk”. If you are prompted with a screen saying “install blocked” as shown in the image below, follow along with the next step. If not you may skip the next step.

Image

The Nvidia Shield security settings by default will prevent it from running unknown apps. Click “settings” on the “install blocked” message. Scroll down and check the following box, “Unknown Sources: Allow installation of apps from unknown sources” as shown below.

Image

You should now be able to successfully install the app. Once the app is installed, we can move on to installing the windows proxy on your computer.

2) The first piece of software you need to download on your computer is “WinPcap”. This allows the computer to capture and transmit network packets. The download link is here: http://www.winpcap.org/install/. Simply download the program on your Geforce PC for WinPCap, and then run the installer.

Image

3)Now before we can install the last piece of software, you need to make sure the correct ports on your router are forwarded . Log onto your router by opening up a web browser, and typing the ip address that your router is located at. By default, most routers are located at “192.168.1.1”.

Image

You will then be prompted to enter a user name and password. If you are unsure, the default username/password combinations for a router are usually:

USER: admin
PASSWORD: admin

USER: admin
PASSWORD: password

If neither of those work, locate your router and check the bottom/side of it to see if there is a preset login/password printed on a label. If not, you may have to hard reset the router to revert back the default password.

Image

Once logged into the router, you will need to locate the “port forward” menu. Every router is different, so I do not have a guide to show where exactly it is located. If you are having trouble finding it, I recommend googling “how to port forward with {enter router name here}” . Once you find the menu, you will need to forward the following ports:

UDP: 47998, 47999, 48000, 5354
TCP: 35043, 47989, 47991, 47995, 47996

On my router, this looks like the following:

Image

4) The second piece of software needed is the shield proxy for windows. This is the program that listens to the shield proxy app on the shield. Download the latest version on your Geforce PC at: https://github.com/cgutman/ShieldProxyWindows/releases. Download “shieldproxy.zip” and extract it in the desired location you want to run it.

Image

5) That’s pretty much it for the installation, now we need to get everything working together. Anytime you would like to stream away from the house, you first need to run “ShieldProxy.exe” on your Geforce PC. This is the application that we downloaded in the last step (step 4). Launching “ShieldProxy.exe” will show the following command window below:

Image

Do not close this window out, it needs to be open to listen for data from the shield. If you receive the window’s firewall message, make sure both public and private network boxes are checked to ensure all data is passed through.

Now launch the “shield proxy app” on the shield that was downloaded in step 1. Launching the app will show the following screen:

Image

The only thing you need to do is to enter your external IP address of your Geforce PC. If you not sure what that is, click on the following link with your Geforce PC http://www.whatsmyip.org/. Enter that IP Address on the first line in the app, and leave the second line as “5354”.

DEMO:

Now that everything is setup, it is time to test it out. Make sure “ShieldProxy.exe” is running on your Geforce PC. Connect to a foreign WIFI network (any network that is not your home network) with the shield. Open up the “shield proxy app” on the shield. Click the grey “start” button. While it is active, you will see and icon pop up in the android tray at the top as shown below.

Image

You should now be able to stream as normal. Push the Nvidia button to bring you into the tegrazone, and connect to your home PC. Enjoy!

Image

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#1
Posted 09/21/2013 01:05 AM   
Great Tutorial! I can confirm that this works great with my Shield and even worked fine over my LTE Hotspot (minor pixelation, but great framerate).
Great Tutorial! I can confirm that this works great with my Shield and even worked fine over my LTE Hotspot (minor pixelation, but great framerate).

______________________________________________________________
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#2
Posted 09/21/2013 11:30 PM   
Can one who did this install a bandwidth monitoring app on the streaming computer to find out how much actually leaves the network as tethering my phone to the shield and playing a game that's running at home while on break at work be awesome
Can one who did this install a bandwidth monitoring app on the streaming computer to find out how much actually leaves the network as tethering my phone to the shield and playing a game that's running at home while on break at work be awesome

Computer 1: Pentium 4 3.2 GHz oc to 4.2 GHz, 8 gb ram, 160gb IDE, 2 tb wd red (soon to house another 3 2 tb drives) ~ used as a nas

Computer 2: GA-Z77X-UD3H, Patriot Gamer 2 Series 32GB 1333MHz, i5-3570K, ADATA XPG SX300 128GB mSATA, Thermaltake Overseer, Gigabyte GeForce GT 640, Pioneer Blu-ray burner, LG E2442T-BN, plus 2 random 2 tb drives (wd, Hitachi or Toshiba)

#3
Posted 09/22/2013 01:36 PM   
Simply amazing thank you so much.
Simply amazing thank you so much.

#4
Posted 10/12/2013 12:42 AM   
Nice guide! Unfortunetly I live in Australia and we don't have those upload speeds... Hmm or even a release date for the shield lol.
Nice guide! Unfortunetly I live in Australia and we don't have those upload speeds... Hmm or even a release date for the shield lol.

#5
Posted 10/15/2013 06:05 AM   
This works great but what at school this doesn't work, our school system uses fortiguard to filter connections. Any ideas on how to get around this? ps. I want to stream at school mostly for working on projects ect.
This works great but what at school this doesn't work, our school system uses fortiguard to filter connections. Any ideas on how to get around this? ps. I want to stream at school mostly for working on projects ect.

#6
Posted 10/30/2013 12:58 AM   
[quote="PureDeath"]This works great but what at school this doesn't work, our school system uses fortiguard to filter connections. Any ideas on how to get around this? ps. I want to stream at school mostly for working on projects ect.[/quote] That could be tricky, the only thing I could say is try connecting through a VPN. They probably do it for a reason tho, so I don't want to encourage doing something against their terms/policies.
PureDeath said:This works great but what at school this doesn't work, our school system uses fortiguard to filter connections. Any ideas on how to get around this? ps. I want to stream at school mostly for working on projects ect.


That could be tricky, the only thing I could say is try connecting through a VPN. They probably do it for a reason tho, so I don't want to encourage doing something against their terms/policies.

Intel i7-2600K OC 4.5 GHZ CPU | EVGA Titan X SC GPU | Corsair RM 1000 GOLD PSU
G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB DDR3 1600 RAM | ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3 MOBO |
ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q Monitor | Corsair Carbide Air 540 Case

#7
Posted 10/30/2013 02:59 AM   
It'll be pretty hard to get passed the FortiNet device. We have it configured at a school so that anyone not in a Bypass OU/Group is blocked from doing pretty much anything. Most of this will mean nothing to you but someone on here I'm sure knows what I mean :)
It'll be pretty hard to get passed the FortiNet device. We have it configured at a school so that anyone not in a Bypass OU/Group is blocked from doing pretty much anything. Most of this will mean nothing to you but someone on here I'm sure knows what I mean :)

#8
Posted 11/03/2013 07:29 PM   
Streaming 110 Miles from home on 4G LTE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xH9Vo_zKrk4
Streaming 110 Miles from home on 4G LTE

#9
Posted 11/06/2013 11:02 PM   
[quote="Egg-Roll"]Can one who did this install a bandwidth monitoring app on the streaming computer to find out how much actually leaves the network as tethering my phone to the shield and playing a game that's running at home while on break at work be awesome[/quote] Not sure this is what you want, but if you set this up, run it for a minute or two, you can go to the shield and see data usage, and it should show you how much it pulled down over that time frame. Last night, playing for an hour or two, I used 4.5 GB inside my home. So while I am sure the tools are sophisticated enough to downsize those numbers when bandwidth is not available, I would suspect any data plan you have will get eaten up rather quickly.
Egg-Roll said:Can one who did this install a bandwidth monitoring app on the streaming computer to find out how much actually leaves the network as tethering my phone to the shield and playing a game that's running at home while on break at work be awesome


Not sure this is what you want, but if you set this up, run it for a minute or two, you can go to the shield and see data usage, and it should show you how much it pulled down over that time frame.

Last night, playing for an hour or two, I used 4.5 GB inside my home. So while I am sure the tools are sophisticated enough to downsize those numbers when bandwidth is not available, I would suspect any data plan you have will get eaten up rather quickly.

#10
Posted 11/08/2013 03:58 PM   
When I do this, it can connect to the computer fine but there is no video, only sound. After a few second it will just say "can't connect to pc"
When I do this, it can connect to the computer fine but there is no video, only sound. After a few second it will just say "can't connect to pc"

#11
Posted 11/09/2013 08:36 PM   
To make this even better I set up Wake on Lan with my desktop so I can let my computer sleep and then use my shield to remotely wake my computer so I dont have to leave it running all day. Also the shield proxy for android app can be used with other apps like splashtop so you can remotely connect to your desktop outside of your network. This comes in really handy when I forget to run shield proxy for windows and have to connect to my computer to start it to stream games.
To make this even better I set up Wake on Lan with my desktop so I can let my computer sleep and then use my shield to remotely wake my computer so I dont have to leave it running all day. Also the shield proxy for android app can be used with other apps like splashtop so you can remotely connect to your desktop outside of your network. This comes in really handy when I forget to run shield proxy for windows and have to connect to my computer to start it to stream games.

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#12
Posted 11/23/2013 06:59 PM   
Was able to play Skyrim at Campus today using this trick. all my classmates were like "what sorcery is this?" One thing I noticed is that you have to have the shield proxy program open on your computer to stream on your home wifi now too.
Was able to play Skyrim at Campus today using this trick. all my classmates were like "what sorcery is this?" One thing I noticed is that you have to have the shield proxy program open on your computer to stream on your home wifi now too.

#13
Posted 12/04/2013 08:58 AM   
This is brilliant and Nvidia should support this. - I for one, purchased my nvidia shield for my international flights for work. I baught it also to play my PC games. Allowing the shield to play my PC games remotely, when on my plane's wifi, would make this completely worth the $! (this also happens to be the reason all my friends won't buy the shield :( )
This is brilliant and Nvidia should support this. - I for one, purchased my nvidia shield for my international flights for work. I baught it also to play my PC games. Allowing the shield to play my PC games remotely, when on my plane's wifi, would make this completely worth the $!

(this also happens to be the reason all my friends won't buy the shield :( )

#14
Posted 12/12/2013 03:12 PM   
btw... it is completely worth the $ anyways :P
btw... it is completely worth the $ anyways :P

#15
Posted 12/12/2013 03:12 PM   
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