RGB OR YCbCr444 ??
RGB OR YCbCr444 ?? which one would be best for games in full HD using HDMI HDMI
RGB OR YCbCr444 ?? which one would be best for games in full HD using HDMI HDMI

#1
Posted 03/13/2013 02:54 PM   
Short answer: YCbCr444. Long answer: I can only go by what I've read, since I haven't studied it too heavily (I've only recently been able to try, and frankly I lack the equipment for an exhaustive test). My understanding is that, all else being equal, you should use YCbCR444. This is because, by default, RGB via HDMI is "compressed" in that it only outputs 16-235 instead of 0-255. This almost makes sense, as most television sets expect a 16-235 input as that's what (most) DVD and BluRay players will feed them. PC monitors, however, are not television sets, and typically expect full-range (0-255) input. This makes the default RGB setting look both dull and washed out. Sometimes you can tweak the screen to compensate for this (lower brightness, higher contrast) but that isn't always an option - and even when it is, it still means you're losing colour fidelity (224 values per channel instead of 256). YCbCR444, however, is a different means of transmitting the same data as RGB. I'm not 100% up with how exactly it's different, but it's supposedly better. Regardless, though, it doesn't suffer the same limitation of the colour range - you'll get the full range you want. This much I've tested and there seems to be a lot of truth to it, in that the whole picture is much more vibrant with this setting. However, some people (Google it for references) insist that this causes reds and magentas to become oversaturated. Basically, too vibrant. These people recommend instead switching to full-range RGB instead, which isn't normally available. Currently I'm trying this, but I haven't done exhaustive testing - I just left it there because it looks good enough for me and doesn't seem to be causing problems. There are a couple of ways to do this manually, but there's also a couple of tools to do it automatically for you: One called (conveniently enough) NV_RGBFullRangeToggle made by a fellow called Peter T, and one madNvLevelsTweaker made by a fellow called Madshi (the same guy who did the MadVR renderer for WMP Classic et al). I found the former tool would crash every time, but the Madshi one appeared to work, so YMMV. Any of these methods cause the RGB setting referred to earlier to behave as full-range RGB instead, so you lose the limited range option (though the tools allow you to set it back if you have need).
Short answer: YCbCr444.

Long answer:

I can only go by what I've read, since I haven't studied it too heavily (I've only recently been able to try, and frankly I lack the equipment for an exhaustive test).

My understanding is that, all else being equal, you should use YCbCR444. This is because, by default, RGB via HDMI is "compressed" in that it only outputs 16-235 instead of 0-255. This almost makes sense, as most television sets expect a 16-235 input as that's what (most) DVD and BluRay players will feed them.

PC monitors, however, are not television sets, and typically expect full-range (0-255) input. This makes the default RGB setting look both dull and washed out. Sometimes you can tweak the screen to compensate for this (lower brightness, higher contrast) but that isn't always an option - and even when it is, it still means you're losing colour fidelity (224 values per channel instead of 256).

YCbCR444, however, is a different means of transmitting the same data as RGB. I'm not 100% up with how exactly it's different, but it's supposedly better. Regardless, though, it doesn't suffer the same limitation of the colour range - you'll get the full range you want. This much I've tested and there seems to be a lot of truth to it, in that the whole picture is much more vibrant with this setting.

However, some people (Google it for references) insist that this causes reds and magentas to become oversaturated. Basically, too vibrant. These people recommend instead switching to full-range RGB instead, which isn't normally available. Currently I'm trying this, but I haven't done exhaustive testing - I just left it there because it looks good enough for me and doesn't seem to be causing problems.

There are a couple of ways to do this manually, but there's also a couple of tools to do it automatically for you: One called (conveniently enough) NV_RGBFullRangeToggle made by a fellow called Peter T, and one madNvLevelsTweaker made by a fellow called Madshi (the same guy who did the MadVR renderer for WMP Classic et al). I found the former tool would crash every time, but the Madshi one appeared to work, so YMMV. Any of these methods cause the RGB setting referred to earlier to behave as full-range RGB instead, so you lose the limited range option (though the tools allow you to set it back if you have need).

#2
Posted 03/14/2013 02:10 PM   
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