GTX 680 NVENC SDK
GeForce GTX 680 supports new h/w based H.264 encoder (NVENC).
There is no NVENC API in the Cuda SDK.
Where can I get the NVENC SDK or API ?


info from nvidia's website:

NVENC
All Kepler GPUs also incorporate a new hardware-based H.264 video encoder, NVENC.
Prior to the introduction of Kepler, video encoding on previous GeForce products was handled by
encode software running on the GPU’s array of CUDA Cores. While the CUDA Cores were able to deliver
tremendous performance speedups compared to CPU-based encoding, one downside of using these
high-speed processor cores to process video encoding was increased power consumption.
By using specialized circuitry for H.264 encoding, the NVENC hardware encoder in Kepler is almost four
times faster than our previous CUDA-based encoder while consuming much less power.

It is important to note that an application can choose to encode using both NVENC hardware and
NVIDIA’s legacy CUDA encoder in parallel, without negatively affecting each other. However, some video
pre-processing algorithms may require CUDA, and this will result in reduced performance from the
CUDA encoder since the available CUDA Cores will be shared by the encoder and pre-processor.
NVENC provides the following:
[Can encode full HD resolution (1080p) videos up to 8x faster than real-time. For example, in high
performance mode, encoding of a 16 minute long 1080p, 30 fps video will take approximately 2
minutes.]
Support for H.264 Base, Main, and High Profile Level 4.1 (same as Blu-ray standard)
Supports MVC (Multiview Video Coding) for stereoscopic video—an extension of H.264 which is
used for Blu-ray 3D.
Up to 4096x4096 encode
We currently expose NVENC through proprietary APIs, and provide an SDK for development using
NVENC. Later this year, CUDA developers will also be able to use the high performance NVENC video
encoder. For example, you could use the compute engines for video pre-processing and then do the
actual H.264 encoding in NVENC. Alternatively, you can choose to improve overall video encoding
performance by running simultaneous parallel encoders in CUDA and NVENC, without affecting each
other’s performance.

NVENC enables a wide range of new use cases for consumers:
HD videoconferencing on mainstream notebooks
Sending the contents of the desktop to the big screen TV (gaming, video) through a wireless
connection
Authoring high quality Blu-ray discs from your HD camcorder
A beta version of Cyberlink MediaEspresso with NVENC support is now available on the GeForce GTX
680 press FTP. Support will be coming soon for Cyberlink PowerDirector and Arcsoft MediaConverter.

source: page 26 of: http://www.geforce.com/Active/en_US/...aper-FINAL.pdf
GeForce GTX 680 supports new h/w based H.264 encoder (NVENC).

There is no NVENC API in the Cuda SDK.

Where can I get the NVENC SDK or API ?





info from nvidia's website:



NVENC

All Kepler GPUs also incorporate a new hardware-based H.264 video encoder, NVENC.

Prior to the introduction of Kepler, video encoding on previous GeForce products was handled by

encode software running on the GPU’s array of CUDA Cores. While the CUDA Cores were able to deliver

tremendous performance speedups compared to CPU-based encoding, one downside of using these

high-speed processor cores to process video encoding was increased power consumption.

By using specialized circuitry for H.264 encoding, the NVENC hardware encoder in Kepler is almost four

times faster than our previous CUDA-based encoder while consuming much less power.



It is important to note that an application can choose to encode using both NVENC hardware and

NVIDIA’s legacy CUDA encoder in parallel, without negatively affecting each other. However, some video

pre-processing algorithms may require CUDA, and this will result in reduced performance from the

CUDA encoder since the available CUDA Cores will be shared by the encoder and pre-processor.

NVENC provides the following:

[Can encode full HD resolution (1080p) videos up to 8x faster than real-time. For example, in high

performance mode, encoding of a 16 minute long 1080p, 30 fps video will take approximately 2

minutes.]

Support for H.264 Base, Main, and High Profile Level 4.1 (same as Blu-ray standard)

Supports MVC (Multiview Video Coding) for stereoscopic video—an extension of H.264 which is

used for Blu-ray 3D.

Up to 4096x4096 encode

We currently expose NVENC through proprietary APIs, and provide an SDK for development using

NVENC. Later this year, CUDA developers will also be able to use the high performance NVENC video

encoder. For example, you could use the compute engines for video pre-processing and then do the

actual H.264 encoding in NVENC. Alternatively, you can choose to improve overall video encoding

performance by running simultaneous parallel encoders in CUDA and NVENC, without affecting each

other’s performance.



NVENC enables a wide range of new use cases for consumers:

HD videoconferencing on mainstream notebooks

Sending the contents of the desktop to the big screen TV (gaming, video) through a wireless

connection

Authoring high quality Blu-ray discs from your HD camcorder

A beta version of Cyberlink MediaEspresso with NVENC support is now available on the GeForce GTX

680 press FTP. Support will be coming soon for Cyberlink PowerDirector and Arcsoft MediaConverter.



source: page 26 of: http://www.geforce.com/Active/en_US/...aper-FINAL.pdf

#1
Posted 04/30/2012 10:24 AM   
NVENC SDK will be coming at a later date.
NVENC SDK will be coming at a later date.

Please send me a PM if I fail to keep up on replying in any specific thread or leave a driver feedback: Driver Feedback

#2
Posted 05/02/2012 06:13 PM   
[quote="ManuelG"]NVENC SDK will be coming at a later date.[/quote] Any update or ETA on the public release of the NVENC SDK?
ManuelG said:NVENC SDK will be coming at a later date.


Any update or ETA on the public release of the NVENC SDK?

#3
Posted 12/01/2012 04:09 PM   
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