PC restarts out of nowhere
Before, my problem was too much Blue Screen occurring on my PC. I replaced my A-Data RAM Sticks and bought the RipJaws X Sticks, and I haven't experienced a single blue screen so far. Now my problem is my PC keeps on restarting for an unknown reason. I know it's not my RAM Sticks anymore because I haven't had any blue screens lately and when I check the memory dumps, there are none unlike before when I was experiencing the blue screen.

My PC will suddenly restart out of nowhere (when I'm playing, watching a movie or a tv show or browsing the net). I don't know which part is causing the problem. How can I diagnose it?

I'm thinking it's my power supply because the power flicks for a second that's why my PC restart but if I thought of it again and, if it's really the power supply then my PC should not restart itself. I mean if the power was gone for 1 second, then the PC should turn off after that one second power flick, not restart itself. Right?

I tried doing a stress test on my PC. I used prime95 and HWMonitor. I tried the In-place Large FFTs. My CPU temp reached around 81 C but it did not restart. So I think it is not overheating.

Here are my computer specs:


Processor: Intel Core i7 860 @ 2.80 Ghz
Motherboard: Asus P7P55D LE
Video Card: ECS GeForce GTS 250
RAM: 2 * 4 GB G.Skill RipjawsX DDR3 1600Mhz (Single Channel Configuration and I don't think it's running at 1600 MHz. I haven't overclocked it.)
Power Supply: 500 W. (I don't know the brand because my dad bought this CPU from Greece built already.)
Hard Drive: 1 x 1 TB Seagate

My dad bought this PC last February 2010.
Before, my problem was too much Blue Screen occurring on my PC. I replaced my A-Data RAM Sticks and bought the RipJaws X Sticks, and I haven't experienced a single blue screen so far. Now my problem is my PC keeps on restarting for an unknown reason. I know it's not my RAM Sticks anymore because I haven't had any blue screens lately and when I check the memory dumps, there are none unlike before when I was experiencing the blue screen.



My PC will suddenly restart out of nowhere (when I'm playing, watching a movie or a tv show or browsing the net). I don't know which part is causing the problem. How can I diagnose it?



I'm thinking it's my power supply because the power flicks for a second that's why my PC restart but if I thought of it again and, if it's really the power supply then my PC should not restart itself. I mean if the power was gone for 1 second, then the PC should turn off after that one second power flick, not restart itself. Right?



I tried doing a stress test on my PC. I used prime95 and HWMonitor. I tried the In-place Large FFTs. My CPU temp reached around 81 C but it did not restart. So I think it is not overheating.



Here are my computer specs:





Processor: Intel Core i7 860 @ 2.80 Ghz

Motherboard: Asus P7P55D LE

Video Card: ECS GeForce GTS 250

RAM: 2 * 4 GB G.Skill RipjawsX DDR3 1600Mhz (Single Channel Configuration and I don't think it's running at 1600 MHz. I haven't overclocked it.)

Power Supply: 500 W. (I don't know the brand because my dad bought this CPU from Greece built already.)

Hard Drive: 1 x 1 TB Seagate



My dad bought this PC last February 2010.

#1
Posted 04/26/2012 07:53 AM   
2 things here.....

Your power supply is to small. The fact that you suspect it should be your first reason to replace it. That and the fact you do not know its stats :)

If your getting a FLICKER when your PC restarts it could be that you have to much being pulled on the same line the computer is plugged into or the wiring in the hows is really old....if either of those two scenerios are the cause of the Flicker, your house could become a casualty.


But always check the motherboard for damaged CAPACITORS. These are small round barrel shaped items with FLAT tops. IF the tops not flat, that can be a problem and it acts like a power issue. These newer boards have Solid Caps, but I assume they will do the same thing.
2 things here.....



Your power supply is to small. The fact that you suspect it should be your first reason to replace it. That and the fact you do not know its stats :)



If your getting a FLICKER when your PC restarts it could be that you have to much being pulled on the same line the computer is plugged into or the wiring in the hows is really old....if either of those two scenerios are the cause of the Flicker, your house could become a casualty.





But always check the motherboard for damaged CAPACITORS. These are small round barrel shaped items with FLAT tops. IF the tops not flat, that can be a problem and it acts like a power issue. These newer boards have Solid Caps, but I assume they will do the same thing.

My Opinion is no more important or right than yours. But if your using the LATEST drivers, go back to the prior set.

Piss Poor tech support blame all issues on drivers and assumes that your an idiot. Find a set that you know worked and see if the problem exists still.

""Don't f with it if it ain't broken!""

Constantly updating drivers is a good way to F'up the whole system.

#2
Posted 04/26/2012 12:27 PM   
Are you saying that the 500 W of my Power Supply is not enough for my current parts? Also, my PC is the only thing plugged in to that line.
Are you saying that the 500 W of my Power Supply is not enough for my current parts? Also, my PC is the only thing plugged in to that line.

#3
Posted 04/26/2012 01:46 PM   
Regarding the circuit the PC is plugged into. 'That line' may have other outlets in other rooms or the room you are in. The number of circuits you house has can be determined by the
number of circuit breakers or fuses your fuse box has that are dedicated to the power outlets (power points as we say here in Oz), and where those circuits go in the house can be found by
turning the circuit breakers off one by one and finding which power outlets are not functioning.
Uneven power(spikes or drops)over your household circuit can play havoc on many modern toys - microwaves, TV's, computers.
On a similar note - A few years back PC would re-boot mysteriously. It only happened when I was out of the room, but after some time I figured out it was happening when I switched a large exhaust fan on in my workshop.
In this instance it was because the power supply was an older style that did not have the same level of power smoothing circuitry as newer psu's should have (and cheap one's still do not), so I never had that problem with my next PC.

While 450W is the minimum suggested by Nvidia a cheap psu, which is what most pre-built PC's come with, is generally not up to the task, especially when it is close to
the [i]minimum[/i] required as that means it is working close to max capacity all the time which tends to stress the psu in the first instance, and then the cheap components (capacitors, coils)
in cheap psu's will begin breaking down and not delivering a smooth steady current to the components. This often results in random shutdowns or restarts like you are experiencing (except in the kind of situation described above).
If it happens too frequently or in quick succession it can damage the components, so even after buying a new psu and not having the random restarts, the user may find he still has issues with performance or stability.
Cheap psu's also may have the power distributed poorly giving to many amps to the +3 & +5V rails vs the +12V rails, or may not even be capable of producing the Watts they have on the lable.
A good quality 500W psu should have about 36amps on the +12V rail.

Regarding the RAM. Yes do not try running it at 1600MHz, but do use dual channel mode for better performance, assuming the RAM came as a kit and can do dual channel.
Regarding the circuit the PC is plugged into. 'That line' may have other outlets in other rooms or the room you are in. The number of circuits you house has can be determined by the

number of circuit breakers or fuses your fuse box has that are dedicated to the power outlets (power points as we say here in Oz), and where those circuits go in the house can be found by

turning the circuit breakers off one by one and finding which power outlets are not functioning.

Uneven power(spikes or drops)over your household circuit can play havoc on many modern toys - microwaves, TV's, computers.

On a similar note - A few years back PC would re-boot mysteriously. It only happened when I was out of the room, but after some time I figured out it was happening when I switched a large exhaust fan on in my workshop.

In this instance it was because the power supply was an older style that did not have the same level of power smoothing circuitry as newer psu's should have (and cheap one's still do not), so I never had that problem with my next PC.



While 450W is the minimum suggested by Nvidia a cheap psu, which is what most pre-built PC's come with, is generally not up to the task, especially when it is close to

the minimum required as that means it is working close to max capacity all the time which tends to stress the psu in the first instance, and then the cheap components (capacitors, coils)

in cheap psu's will begin breaking down and not delivering a smooth steady current to the components. This often results in random shutdowns or restarts like you are experiencing (except in the kind of situation described above).

If it happens too frequently or in quick succession it can damage the components, so even after buying a new psu and not having the random restarts, the user may find he still has issues with performance or stability.

Cheap psu's also may have the power distributed poorly giving to many amps to the +3 & +5V rails vs the +12V rails, or may not even be capable of producing the Watts they have on the lable.

A good quality 500W psu should have about 36amps on the +12V rail.



Regarding the RAM. Yes do not try running it at 1600MHz, but do use dual channel mode for better performance, assuming the RAM came as a kit and can do dual channel.

BossDweebe is in his second childhood, or would be if he'd ever left the first.

#4
Posted 04/26/2012 02:47 PM   
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