Do you need tripple buffering with the new Adaptive Vsync option enabled?
Ok guys, as you may or may not know, previously the best way to get performance with vsync enabled was to also enable triple buffering.

Now with the new beta driver option "adaptive vsync" little is told if you still want the old method as well.

So, here is the place to probably come to ask:

Do we want triple buffering enabled with the adaptive vsync option??
Ok guys, as you may or may not know, previously the best way to get performance with vsync enabled was to also enable triple buffering.



Now with the new beta driver option "adaptive vsync" little is told if you still want the old method as well.



So, here is the place to probably come to ask:



Do we want triple buffering enabled with the adaptive vsync option??

#1
Posted 04/17/2012 11:02 PM   
[quote name='porschedrifter' date='17 April 2012 - 07:02 PM' timestamp='1334703742' post='1397631']
Ok guys, as you may or may not know, previously the best way to get performance with vsync enabled was to also enable triple buffering.

Now with the new beta driver option "adaptive vsync" little is told if you still want the old method as well.

So, here is the place to probably come to ask:

Do we want triple buffering enabled with the adaptive vsync option??
[/quote]

[i]Triple buffering is only supported by OpenGL applications. Vertical synchronization eliminates screen tearing by locking to your displays refresh rate. Adaptive V-sync is a "hybrid" technology combing vertical synchronization and automatically disabling the feature when frames drop below desired performance sync. Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.[/i]

-Hooks
[quote name='porschedrifter' date='17 April 2012 - 07:02 PM' timestamp='1334703742' post='1397631']

Ok guys, as you may or may not know, previously the best way to get performance with vsync enabled was to also enable triple buffering.



Now with the new beta driver option "adaptive vsync" little is told if you still want the old method as well.



So, here is the place to probably come to ask:



Do we want triple buffering enabled with the adaptive vsync option??





Triple buffering is only supported by OpenGL applications. Vertical synchronization eliminates screen tearing by locking to your displays refresh rate. Adaptive V-sync is a "hybrid" technology combing vertical synchronization and automatically disabling the feature when frames drop below desired performance sync. Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



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#2
Posted 04/18/2012 09:55 AM   
[quote name='Righthooks' date='18 April 2012 - 01:55 AM' timestamp='1334742911' post='1397765']
[i]Triple buffering is only supported by OpenGL applications. Vertical synchronization eliminates screen tearing by locking to your displays refresh rate. Adaptive V-sync is a "hybrid" technology combing vertical synchronization and automatically disabling the feature when frames drop below desired performance sync. Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.[/i]

-Hooks[/quote]

The op's question is about the principle of triple buffering working in conjunction with adaptive vsync, not which api nvcp's triple buffering works with. For DirectX, I assume he's referring to D3DOverrider's dx9/10/11 triple buffering.

To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz). The performance of vsync off and adaptive vsync without triple buffering when fps is below 60, are practically identical. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />
[quote name='Righthooks' date='18 April 2012 - 01:55 AM' timestamp='1334742911' post='1397765']

Triple buffering is only supported by OpenGL applications. Vertical synchronization eliminates screen tearing by locking to your displays refresh rate. Adaptive V-sync is a "hybrid" technology combing vertical synchronization and automatically disabling the feature when frames drop below desired performance sync. Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.



-Hooks



The op's question is about the principle of triple buffering working in conjunction with adaptive vsync, not which api nvcp's triple buffering works with. For DirectX, I assume he's referring to D3DOverrider's dx9/10/11 triple buffering.



To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz). The performance of vsync off and adaptive vsync without triple buffering when fps is below 60, are practically identical. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

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#3
Posted 04/18/2012 06:05 PM   
[quote name='pjr98' date='18 April 2012 - 02:05 PM' timestamp='1334772326' post='1397941']
The op's question is about the principle of triple buffering working in conjunction with adaptive vsync, not which api nvcp's triple buffering works with. For DirectX, I assume he's referring to D3DOverrider's dx9/10/11 triple buffering.

To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz). The performance of vsync off and adaptive vsync without triple buffering when fps is below 60, are practically identical. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />
[/quote]

Though I do use, D3DOverrider, I did forget that generally triple buffering only works with OpenGL applications, so good info all around. However, now with adaptive v-sync, neither is needed! Good to know.
[quote name='pjr98' date='18 April 2012 - 02:05 PM' timestamp='1334772326' post='1397941']

The op's question is about the principle of triple buffering working in conjunction with adaptive vsync, not which api nvcp's triple buffering works with. For DirectX, I assume he's referring to D3DOverrider's dx9/10/11 triple buffering.



To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz). The performance of vsync off and adaptive vsync without triple buffering when fps is below 60, are practically identical. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />





Though I do use, D3DOverrider, I did forget that generally triple buffering only works with OpenGL applications, so good info all around. However, now with adaptive v-sync, neither is needed! Good to know.

#4
Posted 04/21/2012 05:43 PM   
[quote name='porschedrifter' date='21 April 2012 - 07:43 PM' timestamp='1335030225' post='1399165']
Though I do use, D3DOverrider, I did forget that generally triple buffering only works with OpenGL applications, so good info all around. However, now with adaptive v-sync, neither is needed! Good to know.
[/quote]

The question then becomes, how to programmatically turn adaptive v-sync on?
I'm using OpenGL and have used wglSwapControl sofar (wglSwapControl(1) to turn on vsync).

Anyone have an idea?
[quote name='porschedrifter' date='21 April 2012 - 07:43 PM' timestamp='1335030225' post='1399165']

Though I do use, D3DOverrider, I did forget that generally triple buffering only works with OpenGL applications, so good info all around. However, now with adaptive v-sync, neither is needed! Good to know.





The question then becomes, how to programmatically turn adaptive v-sync on?

I'm using OpenGL and have used wglSwapControl sofar (wglSwapControl(1) to turn on vsync).



Anyone have an idea?

#5
Posted 05/23/2012 10:45 AM   
[quote name='pjr98' date='18 April 2012 - 02:05 PM' timestamp='1334772326' post='1397941']To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz).
[/quote]

A fair assumption perhaps, but in practice, games/benchmarks can suffer significantly less stuttering while forcing triple buffering. See below graph.

[quote name='Righthooks' date='18 April 2012 - 05:55 AM' timestamp='1334742911' post='1397765']
[i]Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.[/i]
[/quote]

With regard to the driver control panel setting, you are correct. However, it is indeed possible to manipulate the back buffer count in DirectX/Direct3D (after all, that is what D3DOverrider does). Refer to the following graph (tests performed in Direct3D).

[img]http://forums.nvidia.com/uploads/monthly_05_2012/post-361-13381175301997.png[/img]

P.S. - Triple buffering [color="#2E8B57"](TB)[/color] tests were performed [b]before[/b] the double buffered [color="#FF0000"](DB)[/color] 2nd run, so you can clearly see how double buffering negatively affected performance.
[quote name='pjr98' date='18 April 2012 - 02:05 PM' timestamp='1334772326' post='1397941']To answer, my assumption would be that there is no need for triple buffering with adaptive vsync, because vsync is switched off when fps drops below 60 (if your refresh rate is 60hz).





A fair assumption perhaps, but in practice, games/benchmarks can suffer significantly less stuttering while forcing triple buffering. See below graph.



[quote name='Righthooks' date='18 April 2012 - 05:55 AM' timestamp='1334742911' post='1397765']

Triple buffering has no impact whatsoever on DirectX applications, with or without V-sync/Adaptive V-sync. Since the majority of titles are built on DirectX, triple buffering can remain disabled in conjunction with all forms of V-sync unless utilizing an OpenGL application.





With regard to the driver control panel setting, you are correct. However, it is indeed possible to manipulate the back buffer count in DirectX/Direct3D (after all, that is what D3DOverrider does). Refer to the following graph (tests performed in Direct3D).



Image



P.S. - Triple buffering (TB) tests were performed before the double buffered (DB) 2nd run, so you can clearly see how double buffering negatively affected performance.
Attachments

adaptivedbvstb.png

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#6
Posted 05/27/2012 11:19 AM   
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