GTX 260 only works in one slot?
Hello there, I run a pair of GTX 260s SLi on an XFX 750i MB. Ran into an interesting problem that has me stumped.

Ok, one card is EVGA branded and the other is BFG. I've been running the EVGA in my PCI-E #1 slot and my BFG in the PCI-E #2 slot, but since the #1 slot is a 16x slot compared to #2 as a 8x slot that card sees much heavier use. I also run EVGA precision as a fan-speed controller and the #1 slot card's fan never idles lower than around 70% while the #2 card's fan usually stays below 50% unless I'm gaming.

While I'm gaming card #1 usually is in the 90% region and card #2 is in the 60% region.


Well, in the interest of saving the fan motors I want to switch the cards around and put the BFG in slot #1 and put the EVGA in slot #2, let the BFG run hot and with a higher fan speed for a while.
So I shut down, power down, unplug the monitors, SLi, and power cables, and I switch the cards around.
Plug everything back up, power up, boot up, it works.
I start up EVGA precision, and it only detects one card. I start up Nvidia control panel, only one card. I go to Windows Device Manager, only one card!

So for the next couple of hours I unhook and retry multiple times, I try running only the BFG and then both, I tried without the SLi bridge in place, I tried wiggling it in the slot, I tried plugging it in while the PC is running, I tried everything I could think of. Now I'm think the card is just toasted and maybe I killed it.
But as a last ditch I revert back to putting the EVGA in #1 and the BFG in #2.

... Works just fine.



So how come the BFG will work in both slots but the EVGA will only work in slot #1? Is it possibly something I did wrong? Is there some setting that makes that card want to be in slot #1 like a HDD being master/slave?
Is the EVGA destined to run hot and spin the fan near max until it dies?


Any thoughts? Should I just not worry about it?
Hello there, I run a pair of GTX 260s SLi on an XFX 750i MB. Ran into an interesting problem that has me stumped.



Ok, one card is EVGA branded and the other is BFG. I've been running the EVGA in my PCI-E #1 slot and my BFG in the PCI-E #2 slot, but since the #1 slot is a 16x slot compared to #2 as a 8x slot that card sees much heavier use. I also run EVGA precision as a fan-speed controller and the #1 slot card's fan never idles lower than around 70% while the #2 card's fan usually stays below 50% unless I'm gaming.



While I'm gaming card #1 usually is in the 90% region and card #2 is in the 60% region.





Well, in the interest of saving the fan motors I want to switch the cards around and put the BFG in slot #1 and put the EVGA in slot #2, let the BFG run hot and with a higher fan speed for a while.

So I shut down, power down, unplug the monitors, SLi, and power cables, and I switch the cards around.

Plug everything back up, power up, boot up, it works.

I start up EVGA precision, and it only detects one card. I start up Nvidia control panel, only one card. I go to Windows Device Manager, only one card!



So for the next couple of hours I unhook and retry multiple times, I try running only the BFG and then both, I tried without the SLi bridge in place, I tried wiggling it in the slot, I tried plugging it in while the PC is running, I tried everything I could think of. Now I'm think the card is just toasted and maybe I killed it.

But as a last ditch I revert back to putting the EVGA in #1 and the BFG in #2.



... Works just fine.







So how come the BFG will work in both slots but the EVGA will only work in slot #1? Is it possibly something I did wrong? Is there some setting that makes that card want to be in slot #1 like a HDD being master/slave?

Is the EVGA destined to run hot and spin the fan near max until it dies?





Any thoughts? Should I just not worry about it?

#1
Posted 04/17/2012 04:14 AM   
There shouldn't be any reason why the card won't work in the other slot.

That said, you aren't likely going to kill the fan on the GPU either. The typical life span for most such things is usually around 50000 - 100000 hours running. 6 - 12 years.
There shouldn't be any reason why the card won't work in the other slot.



That said, you aren't likely going to kill the fan on the GPU either. The typical life span for most such things is usually around 50000 - 100000 hours running. 6 - 12 years.
[quote name='-{RaptoR}-' date='17 April 2012 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1334638867' post='1397347']
There shouldn't be any reason why the card won't work in the other slot.
[/quote]

That's why it has me stumped.

[quote name='-{RaptoR}-' date='17 April 2012 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1334638867' post='1397347']
That said, you aren't likely going to kill the fan on the GPU either. The typical life span for most such things is usually around 50000 - 100000 hours running. 6 - 12 years.
[/quote]


That's good to know. By the time it burns out I should need/want to upgrade to (a) newer GPU(s).

Lucky for me I run everything in an Antec 1200 and I have the intake filters installed with replacements on the shelf just in case. No dust gets in there.
[quote name='-{RaptoR}-' date='17 April 2012 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1334638867' post='1397347']

There shouldn't be any reason why the card won't work in the other slot.





That's why it has me stumped.



[quote name='-{RaptoR}-' date='17 April 2012 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1334638867' post='1397347']

That said, you aren't likely going to kill the fan on the GPU either. The typical life span for most such things is usually around 50000 - 100000 hours running. 6 - 12 years.







That's good to know. By the time it burns out I should need/want to upgrade to (a) newer GPU(s).



Lucky for me I run everything in an Antec 1200 and I have the intake filters installed with replacements on the shelf just in case. No dust gets in there.

#3
Posted 04/18/2012 06:52 AM   
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