My 2x 680 sli are bored to death
with my 1920x1200 monitor (Dell U2410), so I want another monitor. I want a 2560x1600 monitor and there's 2 that I've looked at so far; Dell U3011 and HPZR30w - are their others worthy? Now what's confusing to me is that I've read where some say the Dell has more input lag than the HP, but both have a 7ms response time according to their specs - what gives?. The monitor will have a dual purpose; photo editing and gaming. Also will the 680 sli have any issues running a 2560x1600 monitor? Games I play Crysis2, Crysis, BF3, Batman AC and there's a couple more. Help me make a decision.
Thanks...Al
with my 1920x1200 monitor (Dell U2410), so I want another monitor. I want a 2560x1600 monitor and there's 2 that I've looked at so far; Dell U3011 and HPZR30w - are their others worthy? Now what's confusing to me is that I've read where some say the Dell has more input lag than the HP, but both have a 7ms response time according to their specs - what gives?. The monitor will have a dual purpose; photo editing and gaming. Also will the 680 sli have any issues running a 2560x1600 monitor? Games I play Crysis2, Crysis, BF3, Batman AC and there's a couple more. Help me make a decision.

Thanks...Al

Monitor: Dell U3011 and U2410

Case: CM HAF 932

PSU: Corsair Gold AX750

MB: Asus P8z68-V Pro

CPU: Intel i7 2600K @4.6Ghz

RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16gb DDR3 SDRAM 1600

Video: Asus GTX 680 SLI

Audio: Asus Xonar 7.1

OS drive: OCZ Vertex 3 120gb SSD

Data Storage: WD Caviar Black 2tb, Sata 6.0gb/s HDD

CPU cooler: CM Hyper 212 Evo

Optical drive: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD burner w/lightscribe support

OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Pro 64 bit

#1
Posted 04/14/2012 10:02 AM   
I can help you out on this.

Why does the U3011 have more input lag than the HPZR30W? Because the U3011 features an OSD while the ZR30W does not. The difference between the two is around 15ms on average, which is almost a whole frame at 60Hz. That said, 30ms of lag (U3011) may be considered bad by some, however most folks are fine with it. The U2410 has a "game mode" that reduces input latency by around 15ms, which puts it under a frame of lag at 60Hz (I've witnessed this first hand with mine). The U3011 has this feature as well, but unfortunately it just doesn't work as well as it does on the U2410. This can be confirmed by reading the reviews.

Both the U3011 and the ZR30W are excellent monitors. From a pure performance standpoint, the ZR30W is the better buy (especially for gamers). However, the U3011 has way more inputs (including Displayport and HDMI) and the OSD I mentioned earlier. A lot of folks think the U3011 has a prettier bezel as well (I'm one of them).

Regarding the 7ms response time that both monitors are touting, keep in mind that this is the pixel response as opposed to the input latency. Input lag ratings are not included in the specs. You have to read some reviews to acquire this information. Sites like TFTcentral are great for this.

Alternatively, you could buy two more U2410 monitors and run your games in 2D surround. This would net you a resolution of 5760 x 1200 (or 3600 x 1920 in portrait mode). Your two GTX 680's will chew through most games at that res and you'll be amazed by all the extra screen real estate. Surround gaming is awesome when it works correctly. Either way, gaming at 2560 x 1600 is still a sight to behold and you'll be able to crank the up the AA a little more in this scenario. Food for thought anyway.
I can help you out on this.



Why does the U3011 have more input lag than the HPZR30W? Because the U3011 features an OSD while the ZR30W does not. The difference between the two is around 15ms on average, which is almost a whole frame at 60Hz. That said, 30ms of lag (U3011) may be considered bad by some, however most folks are fine with it. The U2410 has a "game mode" that reduces input latency by around 15ms, which puts it under a frame of lag at 60Hz (I've witnessed this first hand with mine). The U3011 has this feature as well, but unfortunately it just doesn't work as well as it does on the U2410. This can be confirmed by reading the reviews.



Both the U3011 and the ZR30W are excellent monitors. From a pure performance standpoint, the ZR30W is the better buy (especially for gamers). However, the U3011 has way more inputs (including Displayport and HDMI) and the OSD I mentioned earlier. A lot of folks think the U3011 has a prettier bezel as well (I'm one of them).



Regarding the 7ms response time that both monitors are touting, keep in mind that this is the pixel response as opposed to the input latency. Input lag ratings are not included in the specs. You have to read some reviews to acquire this information. Sites like TFTcentral are great for this.



Alternatively, you could buy two more U2410 monitors and run your games in 2D surround. This would net you a resolution of 5760 x 1200 (or 3600 x 1920 in portrait mode). Your two GTX 680's will chew through most games at that res and you'll be amazed by all the extra screen real estate. Surround gaming is awesome when it works correctly. Either way, gaming at 2560 x 1600 is still a sight to behold and you'll be able to crank the up the AA a little more in this scenario. Food for thought anyway.

EVGA E758 A1 X58 // Core i7 920@4Ghz // OCZ Platinum DDR3 1600 // EVGA GTX 670 SLI // Seasonic X Series Gold 1050w // Corsair 800D // Dual Dell Ultrasharp U2410 displays // Dell Ultrasharp 2408WFP

#2
Posted 04/14/2012 02:23 PM   
Thanks Slamscaper for your insight. Call me crazy, but I am not into the surround mode yet. I am just interested in single monitor play; crazy I know. The fact that the HP does not have OSD would make it hard for me to calibrate, no? I need to be able to calibrate for photo editing.

Again thanks.

Al
Thanks Slamscaper for your insight. Call me crazy, but I am not into the surround mode yet. I am just interested in single monitor play; crazy I know. The fact that the HP does not have OSD would make it hard for me to calibrate, no? I need to be able to calibrate for photo editing.



Again thanks.



Al

Monitor: Dell U3011 and U2410

Case: CM HAF 932

PSU: Corsair Gold AX750

MB: Asus P8z68-V Pro

CPU: Intel i7 2600K @4.6Ghz

RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16gb DDR3 SDRAM 1600

Video: Asus GTX 680 SLI

Audio: Asus Xonar 7.1

OS drive: OCZ Vertex 3 120gb SSD

Data Storage: WD Caviar Black 2tb, Sata 6.0gb/s HDD

CPU cooler: CM Hyper 212 Evo

Optical drive: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD burner w/lightscribe support

OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Pro 64 bit

#3
Posted 04/15/2012 01:49 AM   
[quote name='Methodical' date='15 April 2012 - 02:49 AM' timestamp='1334454596' post='1396526']
Thanks Slamscaper for your insight. Call me crazy, but I am not into the surround mode yet. I am just interested in single monitor play; crazy I know. The fact that the HP does not have OSD would make it hard for me to calibrate, no? I need to be able to calibrate for photo editing.

Again thanks.

Al
[/quote]

I can understand your feelings regarding surround. Some gamers just like a single seamless screen, although if I were you I would at least research into surround gaming a bit to be sure it's not something you'd like.

As to your next question, the omission of the OSD won't hinder your ability to calibrate the ZR30W. In fact, the ZR30W's S-IPS panel delivers truly excellent results when calibrated correctly. You don't actually need OSD controls to calibrate any display, as this can be done completely in software using any reliable calibration utility. Once you achieve calibration via your software of choice, an ICM profile is created and color managed applications (like Photoshop) will utilize this profile to ensure that the display delivers accurate colors.

Yeah, it's always better to calibrate via the OSD if you can, but most displays (even a lot of high-end ones) don't have the required controls to do this. For example, even the U3011 cannot be fully calibrated via the OSD because it lacks a built-in gamma control (as does the U2410). In that case, you'd use the OSD to calibrate the display as close as possible, then create an ICM profile via software to achieve full calibration.

Only the extremely high-end professional displays (like those from NEC or EIZO) allow full calibration via the OSD. These displays allow full access to the hardware LUT that's built into the display. Dell's high-end monitors do feature hardware LUT's, but they cannot be programmed by any known consumer software. This means full calibration must be carried out via software in this case, as the hardware LUT can only be programmed at the factory by a certified Dell technician.
[quote name='Methodical' date='15 April 2012 - 02:49 AM' timestamp='1334454596' post='1396526']

Thanks Slamscaper for your insight. Call me crazy, but I am not into the surround mode yet. I am just interested in single monitor play; crazy I know. The fact that the HP does not have OSD would make it hard for me to calibrate, no? I need to be able to calibrate for photo editing.



Again thanks.



Al





I can understand your feelings regarding surround. Some gamers just like a single seamless screen, although if I were you I would at least research into surround gaming a bit to be sure it's not something you'd like.



As to your next question, the omission of the OSD won't hinder your ability to calibrate the ZR30W. In fact, the ZR30W's S-IPS panel delivers truly excellent results when calibrated correctly. You don't actually need OSD controls to calibrate any display, as this can be done completely in software using any reliable calibration utility. Once you achieve calibration via your software of choice, an ICM profile is created and color managed applications (like Photoshop) will utilize this profile to ensure that the display delivers accurate colors.



Yeah, it's always better to calibrate via the OSD if you can, but most displays (even a lot of high-end ones) don't have the required controls to do this. For example, even the U3011 cannot be fully calibrated via the OSD because it lacks a built-in gamma control (as does the U2410). In that case, you'd use the OSD to calibrate the display as close as possible, then create an ICM profile via software to achieve full calibration.



Only the extremely high-end professional displays (like those from NEC or EIZO) allow full calibration via the OSD. These displays allow full access to the hardware LUT that's built into the display. Dell's high-end monitors do feature hardware LUT's, but they cannot be programmed by any known consumer software. This means full calibration must be carried out via software in this case, as the hardware LUT can only be programmed at the factory by a certified Dell technician.

EVGA E758 A1 X58 // Core i7 920@4Ghz // OCZ Platinum DDR3 1600 // EVGA GTX 670 SLI // Seasonic X Series Gold 1050w // Corsair 800D // Dual Dell Ultrasharp U2410 displays // Dell Ultrasharp 2408WFP

#4
Posted 04/15/2012 03:31 AM   
Why not go surround instead? It'll add to your field of vision and help on any MP games you play as a result. Also, buying 2 more monitors of your current size will prolly be cheaper than a 30" cuz they're usually overpriced.
Why not go surround instead? It'll add to your field of vision and help on any MP games you play as a result. Also, buying 2 more monitors of your current size will prolly be cheaper than a 30" cuz they're usually overpriced.



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Help fight Cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease by donating unused CPU and GPU power to Stanford University's Research Folding@Home projects:

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#5
Posted 04/15/2012 06:13 AM   
I have thought about the surround and thought about getting 2 more of the same monitors, but I'm just stuck on getting one nice monitor for now. Like I said I know it sounds crazy, but that's where I am at the moment. I know it's crazy.

Thanks...Al
I have thought about the surround and thought about getting 2 more of the same monitors, but I'm just stuck on getting one nice monitor for now. Like I said I know it sounds crazy, but that's where I am at the moment. I know it's crazy.



Thanks...Al

Monitor: Dell U3011 and U2410

Case: CM HAF 932

PSU: Corsair Gold AX750

MB: Asus P8z68-V Pro

CPU: Intel i7 2600K @4.6Ghz

RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16gb DDR3 SDRAM 1600

Video: Asus GTX 680 SLI

Audio: Asus Xonar 7.1

OS drive: OCZ Vertex 3 120gb SSD

Data Storage: WD Caviar Black 2tb, Sata 6.0gb/s HDD

CPU cooler: CM Hyper 212 Evo

Optical drive: Sony Optiarc CD/DVD burner w/lightscribe support

OS: Microsoft Windows 7 Pro 64 bit

#6
Posted 04/15/2012 07:44 AM   
[quote name='Honey Badger' date='15 April 2012 - 07:13 AM' timestamp='1334470382' post='1396553']
Why not go surround instead? It'll add to your field of vision and help on any MP games you play as a result. Also, buying 2 more monitors of your current size will prolly be cheaper than a 30" cuz they're usually overpriced.
[/quote]

Some aren't overpriced for what you're getting. In fact, the ZR30W is a value considering the quality of the panel. The 2560 x 1600 panel used in the ZR30W is of a higher quality than virtually any 1080p panel used in HDTV's. Even the most expensive LCD HDTV's don't feature panels of this quality, although the extremely high-end HDTV's use some fancy filters, polarizers, and post processing algorithms in an attempt to make up for it.

Two more u2410's will cost almost $1000 new (these are high quality monitors) unless you grab them on sale, which will indeed be a little cheaper than the U3011, but not by a boatload. Yeah, the OP could by three run-of-the-mill TN based gaming monitors for a lot less, but photo editing would be atrocious on a crappy TN matrix.
[quote name='Honey Badger' date='15 April 2012 - 07:13 AM' timestamp='1334470382' post='1396553']

Why not go surround instead? It'll add to your field of vision and help on any MP games you play as a result. Also, buying 2 more monitors of your current size will prolly be cheaper than a 30" cuz they're usually overpriced.





Some aren't overpriced for what you're getting. In fact, the ZR30W is a value considering the quality of the panel. The 2560 x 1600 panel used in the ZR30W is of a higher quality than virtually any 1080p panel used in HDTV's. Even the most expensive LCD HDTV's don't feature panels of this quality, although the extremely high-end HDTV's use some fancy filters, polarizers, and post processing algorithms in an attempt to make up for it.



Two more u2410's will cost almost $1000 new (these are high quality monitors) unless you grab them on sale, which will indeed be a little cheaper than the U3011, but not by a boatload. Yeah, the OP could by three run-of-the-mill TN based gaming monitors for a lot less, but photo editing would be atrocious on a crappy TN matrix.

EVGA E758 A1 X58 // Core i7 920@4Ghz // OCZ Platinum DDR3 1600 // EVGA GTX 670 SLI // Seasonic X Series Gold 1050w // Corsair 800D // Dual Dell Ultrasharp U2410 displays // Dell Ultrasharp 2408WFP

#7
Posted 04/15/2012 07:51 AM   
[quote name='slamscaper' date='15 April 2012 - 01:51 AM' timestamp='1334476265' post='1396570']
Some aren't overpriced for what you're getting. In fact, the ZR30W is a value considering the quality of the panel. The 2560 x 1600 panel used in the ZR30W is of a higher quality than virtually any 1080p panel used in HDTV's. Even the most expensive LCD HDTV's don't feature panels of this quality, although the extremely high-end HDTV's use some fancy filters, polarizers, and post processing algorithms in an attempt to make up for it.

Two more u2410's will cost almost $1000 new (these are high quality monitors) unless you grab them on sale, which will indeed be a little cheaper than the U3011, but not by a boatload. Yeah, the OP could by three run-of-the-mill TN based gaming monitors for a lot less, but photo editing would be atrocious on a crappy TN matrix.
[/quote]

Gotta agree with ya there, a quality display is crucial for your main monitor for daily usage inside and outside of gaming. It's one of the main reasons I use my Sony Bravia for everything important, so I can see better and have great picture quality. I've never been a fan of resolutions higher than 1080p though in general, they're just too much "work" for a system when in reality yer not really gaining anything but power draw. lol
[quote name='slamscaper' date='15 April 2012 - 01:51 AM' timestamp='1334476265' post='1396570']

Some aren't overpriced for what you're getting. In fact, the ZR30W is a value considering the quality of the panel. The 2560 x 1600 panel used in the ZR30W is of a higher quality than virtually any 1080p panel used in HDTV's. Even the most expensive LCD HDTV's don't feature panels of this quality, although the extremely high-end HDTV's use some fancy filters, polarizers, and post processing algorithms in an attempt to make up for it.



Two more u2410's will cost almost $1000 new (these are high quality monitors) unless you grab them on sale, which will indeed be a little cheaper than the U3011, but not by a boatload. Yeah, the OP could by three run-of-the-mill TN based gaming monitors for a lot less, but photo editing would be atrocious on a crappy TN matrix.





Gotta agree with ya there, a quality display is crucial for your main monitor for daily usage inside and outside of gaming. It's one of the main reasons I use my Sony Bravia for everything important, so I can see better and have great picture quality. I've never been a fan of resolutions higher than 1080p though in general, they're just too much "work" for a system when in reality yer not really gaining anything but power draw. lol



Image


Image

Help fight Cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease by donating unused CPU and GPU power to Stanford University's Research Folding@Home projects:

Simplest method is to setup the FAH v7 client with this Windows Installation Guide

#8
Posted 04/15/2012 09:39 AM   
[i]Since I own a U3011 I can tell you there is no compromise in color accuracy and pixel quality. In fact it is close to rivaling our $6,000 flat screen in the living room in all aspects. It displays movie playback (Blu-Ray/DVD) similar to old DLP screens in terms of brightness, without over saturation seen with most LED/LCD screens (mainly TN). For games however, there is no comparison. You will instantly notice texture improvements and major UI smoothness, even from the OS desktop. Be warned though, 2560x1600 is a massive jump in performance demand; even with my 3-way GTX580s (3gig) some titles can bring the units to their knees at 2560x1600. If you are like me and prefer maximum image quality and game configurations, you will either have to make the compromise of average 30+FPS compared to 1920x1080, or do what I do and keep a 1080p display (mine is ASUS VE278Q) to hot-swap for more demanding titles to maintain maximum in-game/NVIDIA Inspector settings. Honestly, the U3011 is one of the best products for the money. 16:10 is becoming a more unused native, so certain applications such as Adobe Premiere CS5.5, and AutoDesk software (3DSMax) have scaling defaults that will be in-place. If you don't use such applications, and are focusing on purely gaming...go for it, you have my blessing. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> [/i]

-Hooks
Since I own a U3011 I can tell you there is no compromise in color accuracy and pixel quality. In fact it is close to rivaling our $6,000 flat screen in the living room in all aspects. It displays movie playback (Blu-Ray/DVD) similar to old DLP screens in terms of brightness, without over saturation seen with most LED/LCD screens (mainly TN). For games however, there is no comparison. You will instantly notice texture improvements and major UI smoothness, even from the OS desktop. Be warned though, 2560x1600 is a massive jump in performance demand; even with my 3-way GTX580s (3gig) some titles can bring the units to their knees at 2560x1600. If you are like me and prefer maximum image quality and game configurations, you will either have to make the compromise of average 30+FPS compared to 1920x1080, or do what I do and keep a 1080p display (mine is ASUS VE278Q) to hot-swap for more demanding titles to maintain maximum in-game/NVIDIA Inspector settings. Honestly, the U3011 is one of the best products for the money. 16:10 is becoming a more unused native, so certain applications such as Adobe Premiere CS5.5, and AutoDesk software (3DSMax) have scaling defaults that will be in-place. If you don't use such applications, and are focusing on purely gaming...go for it, you have my blessing. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#9
Posted 04/16/2012 03:12 PM   
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