How do I migrate a RAID-1 array to a new motherboard without an nVidia controller?
My computer recently had a motherboard/cpu/psu failure, I can't really tell which atm as I don't have replacements to test rule parts out, but it's so old I would like to build a new system so I can play some new games. The problem I'm realizing is I had a set of drives (non boot drives) mirrored using RAID-1 under the NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI MCP chipset. My motherboard was an [url="http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/AMD_AM2/CROSSHAIR/"]ASUS Crosshair[/url]. So now I'm looking at a new motherboard, namely the [url="http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/SABERTOOTH_Z77/#specifications"]Sabertooth Z77[/url], but I am noticing it doesn't use an nVidia chipset for RAID, rather it uses an Intel one. After some research I've found that RAID is not standardized for some ungodly reason and each chipset manufacturer seems to use different RAID signatures used in the arrays they create. So what I'm trying to figure out and am looking for some help on is how I can migrate my 2 500GB SATA drives mirrored using RAID-1 to a new system that doesn't have a nVidia RAID controller chipset? Is there some PCI card I can buy with the chipset on it that I can use to get the data off? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

TLDR version
PC Died w/ 2 drive RAID-1 array
New PC w/o nVidia RAID chipset
How do I migrate over?
My computer recently had a motherboard/cpu/psu failure, I can't really tell which atm as I don't have replacements to test rule parts out, but it's so old I would like to build a new system so I can play some new games. The problem I'm realizing is I had a set of drives (non boot drives) mirrored using RAID-1 under the NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI MCP chipset. My motherboard was an ASUS Crosshair. So now I'm looking at a new motherboard, namely the Sabertooth Z77, but I am noticing it doesn't use an nVidia chipset for RAID, rather it uses an Intel one. After some research I've found that RAID is not standardized for some ungodly reason and each chipset manufacturer seems to use different RAID signatures used in the arrays they create. So what I'm trying to figure out and am looking for some help on is how I can migrate my 2 500GB SATA drives mirrored using RAID-1 to a new system that doesn't have a nVidia RAID controller chipset? Is there some PCI card I can buy with the chipset on it that I can use to get the data off? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.



TLDR version

PC Died w/ 2 drive RAID-1 array

New PC w/o nVidia RAID chipset

How do I migrate over?

#1
Posted 04/04/2012 05:41 PM   
dmraid under linux can be used for that.
dmraid under linux can be used for that.
#2
Posted 04/05/2012 09:57 AM   
Linux looks like Chinese , and not user friendly for the average user , ... I found this on another thread . I was thinking that you could use a third drive .

[font=Arial,][size=4]RAID 1 is mirroring; there is no data stripping. Each drive is a copy of the other and [b]each drive will function perfectly as a standalone 'normal' drive[/b]. Just hook it up to a computer and you'll be able to access the data. Your data is not lost. Without the enclosure, you are simply left with one drive and one exact duplicate backup. Not a bad situation.[/size][/font]

[font=Arial,][size=4]Now for data access, you'd want to hook the drive up as read-only. Without the RAID controller, you have no way to keep the drives in sync if you were to write/modify any contents of the drive(s). Modification [i]will happen[/i] if you don't specifically mount the drive as read-only. (Think of a file's last access time for example.)[/size][/font]

[font=Arial,][size=4]As for migrating the two drives as-is into a device with a different RAID controller (or trying to use software RAID), I would have no faith in it working. Others could give you better advice perhaps. I've never migrated across RAID controllers so I'd be nervous and would never attempt it without an additional backup.[/size][/font]

[font=Arial,][size=4]If you want to setup a new RAID array regardless of whatever new product you get, I'd do this...[/size][/font]

[list][*]set aside one of the current drives as your backup[*]get a third drive of same capacity[*]install the second drive and the new/third/empty drive[*]rebuild the array to populate the new drive[/list]
Linux looks like Chinese , and not user friendly for the average user , ... I found this on another thread . I was thinking that you could use a third drive .



[font=Arial,]RAID 1 is mirroring; there is no data stripping. Each drive is a copy of the other and each drive will function perfectly as a standalone 'normal' drive. Just hook it up to a computer and you'll be able to access the data. Your data is not lost. Without the enclosure, you are simply left with one drive and one exact duplicate backup. Not a bad situation.[/font]



[font=Arial,]Now for data access, you'd want to hook the drive up as read-only. Without the RAID controller, you have no way to keep the drives in sync if you were to write/modify any contents of the drive(s). Modification will happen if you don't specifically mount the drive as read-only. (Think of a file's last access time for example.)[/font]



[font=Arial,]As for migrating the two drives as-is into a device with a different RAID controller (or trying to use software RAID), I would have no faith in it working. Others could give you better advice perhaps. I've never migrated across RAID controllers so I'd be nervous and would never attempt it without an additional backup.[/font]



[font=Arial,]If you want to setup a new RAID array regardless of whatever new product you get, I'd do this...[/font]



    [*]set aside one of the current drives as your backup[*]get a third drive of same capacity[*]install the second drive and the new/third/empty drive[*]rebuild the array to populate the new drive

Image

#3
Posted 04/05/2012 10:08 AM   
[quote name='stalker1' date='05 April 2012 - 06:08 AM' timestamp='1333620501' post='1392205']
Linux looks like Chinese , and not user friendly for the average user , ... I found this on another thread . I was thinking that you could use a third drive .

[font=Arial,][size=4]RAID 1 is mirroring; there is no data stripping. Each drive is a copy of the other and [b]each drive will function perfectly as a standalone 'normal' drive[/b]. Just hook it up to a computer and you'll be able to access the data. Your data is not lost. Without the enclosure, you are simply left with one drive and one exact duplicate backup. Not a bad situation.[/size][/font]
...[/quote]

I tried this yesterday on this, my parent's PC. It's a Windows Vista machine with an older version of the nForce chipset, MCP 61 which does support RAID 1. What I first did was just put the drive in and booted up the OS to see what would happen. If I could simply read the files off that would be plenty good enough for me since I could use that as a starting point to rebuild the array on a new system by copying all the files over my network. Sadly the system did not recognize the drive so what I've read must be true about every RAID, even RAID 1 having signatures applied to it so the controller can understand it, but also rendering them useless in new machines without a similarly able controller.

Next I tried going back to the BIOS and enabling this system's RAID controller and then went into the MediaShield RAID utility you can access prior to booting the OS. The RAID utility did see my drive and recognized it as "degraded" which made sense since it was only half of the array. However after I went on to boot the OS did not recognize the drive and mount it with the what I assume is more dated (since it's different than the nForce driver for the ASUS Crosshair's NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI MCP chipset (the MCP 61 ranks as the "[url="http://www.nvidia.com/object/nforce_nf4_winxp32_8.26_11.09.html"]430[/url]" apparently compared to the Crosshai's "590"). I even tried downloading that MCP 61 nForce driver and installing it, but to no avail) I didn't check the first time, maybe I should go back and try, but this time I checked under "Disk Management" and could see that Windows saw the drive only as an unmountable 500GB drive set to "Dynamic" and only gave the option to transform it into a "Basic Disk", but I was afraid if I did that not only would it not only not give me access to the drive's contents, but instead wipe it clean.

So yea.. downloading a livecd.. or rather liveusb version of a linux distro seems like an option. Chinese or not if it can read and copy off the files from the drive I will work with it even though I am extremely novice at linux. I'm also leaving the option open to completely replace the old motherboard with another one bought off eBay just so I can get my data back. It's pretty irritating that the thing I did to safeguard my data is the very thing preventing me access to it.
[quote name='stalker1' date='05 April 2012 - 06:08 AM' timestamp='1333620501' post='1392205']

Linux looks like Chinese , and not user friendly for the average user , ... I found this on another thread . I was thinking that you could use a third drive .



[font=Arial,]RAID 1 is mirroring; there is no data stripping. Each drive is a copy of the other and each drive will function perfectly as a standalone 'normal' drive. Just hook it up to a computer and you'll be able to access the data. Your data is not lost. Without the enclosure, you are simply left with one drive and one exact duplicate backup. Not a bad situation.[/font]

...



I tried this yesterday on this, my parent's PC. It's a Windows Vista machine with an older version of the nForce chipset, MCP 61 which does support RAID 1. What I first did was just put the drive in and booted up the OS to see what would happen. If I could simply read the files off that would be plenty good enough for me since I could use that as a starting point to rebuild the array on a new system by copying all the files over my network. Sadly the system did not recognize the drive so what I've read must be true about every RAID, even RAID 1 having signatures applied to it so the controller can understand it, but also rendering them useless in new machines without a similarly able controller.



Next I tried going back to the BIOS and enabling this system's RAID controller and then went into the MediaShield RAID utility you can access prior to booting the OS. The RAID utility did see my drive and recognized it as "degraded" which made sense since it was only half of the array. However after I went on to boot the OS did not recognize the drive and mount it with the what I assume is more dated (since it's different than the nForce driver for the ASUS Crosshair's NVIDIA nForce 590 SLI MCP chipset (the MCP 61 ranks as the "430" apparently compared to the Crosshai's "590"). I even tried downloading that MCP 61 nForce driver and installing it, but to no avail) I didn't check the first time, maybe I should go back and try, but this time I checked under "Disk Management" and could see that Windows saw the drive only as an unmountable 500GB drive set to "Dynamic" and only gave the option to transform it into a "Basic Disk", but I was afraid if I did that not only would it not only not give me access to the drive's contents, but instead wipe it clean.



So yea.. downloading a livecd.. or rather liveusb version of a linux distro seems like an option. Chinese or not if it can read and copy off the files from the drive I will work with it even though I am extremely novice at linux. I'm also leaving the option open to completely replace the old motherboard with another one bought off eBay just so I can get my data back. It's pretty irritating that the thing I did to safeguard my data is the very thing preventing me access to it.

#4
Posted 04/05/2012 04:37 PM   
[quote name='Jamnetic' date='05 April 2012 - 06:37 PM' timestamp='1333643874' post='1392332']
So yea.. downloading a livecd.. or rather liveusb version of a linux distro seems like an option. Chinese or not if it can read and copy off the files from the drive I will work with it even though I am extremely novice at linux.
[/quote]
it's about 3-4 commands. i'm sorry if it's chinese for some advanced pc guys. /turned.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':turned:' />
[quote name='Jamnetic' date='05 April 2012 - 06:37 PM' timestamp='1333643874' post='1392332']

So yea.. downloading a livecd.. or rather liveusb version of a linux distro seems like an option. Chinese or not if it can read and copy off the files from the drive I will work with it even though I am extremely novice at linux.



it's about 3-4 commands. i'm sorry if it's chinese for some advanced pc guys. /turned.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':turned:' />
#5
Posted 04/06/2012 08:47 AM   
[quote name='bsh' date='05 April 2012 - 05:57 AM' timestamp='1333619867' post='1392204']
dmraid under linux can be used for that.
[/quote]

Many thanks to this user for suggesting Linux. I am now able to access my data with little issue which is all I really wanted. What I ended up doing was downloading an application that installs livecd linux distros onto flash drives (found [url="http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/"]here[/url]) and the latest version of Knoppix (the DVD version). After that it really was as simple as booting with the flash drive. Knoppix loaded and mounted the original OS drive in this machine along with my RAID 1 drive without issue and let me copy files off of it intact. I didn't even have to deal with dmraid commands, I guess Knoppix dealt with that for me as well. Thanks again to everyone who helped with this problem and hopefully this can be a solution to anyone who runs into this in the future :-)
[quote name='bsh' date='05 April 2012 - 05:57 AM' timestamp='1333619867' post='1392204']

dmraid under linux can be used for that.





Many thanks to this user for suggesting Linux. I am now able to access my data with little issue which is all I really wanted. What I ended up doing was downloading an application that installs livecd linux distros onto flash drives (found here) and the latest version of Knoppix (the DVD version). After that it really was as simple as booting with the flash drive. Knoppix loaded and mounted the original OS drive in this machine along with my RAID 1 drive without issue and let me copy files off of it intact. I didn't even have to deal with dmraid commands, I guess Knoppix dealt with that for me as well. Thanks again to everyone who helped with this problem and hopefully this can be a solution to anyone who runs into this in the future :-)

#6
Posted 04/06/2012 11:28 PM   
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