GTX560Ti 295.73 Driver Install Fail
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I've tried installing the new 295.73 driver for my GTX560 Ti for the past 30 mins and it fails every time. It begins the install process and my screen goes black for a second (which it usually does with a new driver install) but during that time I hear the windows error noise and when my screen comes back I see this:

"nvcplsetupeng: error

Could not create folder "C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp".
The system cannot find the path specified."

Now the reason it's saying it can't find the specified path is because I don't have a C drive, I have an F drive. All of my previous version installs worked fine except for this one. I'm running Win7 64-bit and I have the correct driver to install but this new nvcplsetupeng.exe is going straight for a C drive that does not exist on my system. Is there anything I can do to get this thing to work or am I screwed until something else comes along?

Help is appreciated.
I've tried installing the new 295.73 driver for my GTX560 Ti for the past 30 mins and it fails every time. It begins the install process and my screen goes black for a second (which it usually does with a new driver install) but during that time I hear the windows error noise and when my screen comes back I see this:



"nvcplsetupeng: error



Could not create folder "C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp".

The system cannot find the path specified."



Now the reason it's saying it can't find the specified path is because I don't have a C drive, I have an F drive. All of my previous version installs worked fine except for this one. I'm running Win7 64-bit and I have the correct driver to install but this new nvcplsetupeng.exe is going straight for a C drive that does not exist on my system. Is there anything I can do to get this thing to work or am I screwed until something else comes along?



Help is appreciated.

#1
Posted 02/21/2012 05:11 PM   
Just curious here, why is you main system drive labeled F: and not C: ?

Two things you can do here:

1. Re-letter your system drive, it's easy to do in computer management then disk management, then right click on disk and change drive letter.

2. Create a new folder in your F: drive, name it Nvidia so that you know what it's all about. Then right click the driver file you have downloaded and "extract" or "un-zip" it to the new folder you just created. Then try to install from the new folder only, using the setup.exe file which should be present once fully unzipped. I use WinRAR for all zip files, but basic Windows should be able to handle this one. Also, pay close attention to your install options if any, note the destination!

Give it a shot and let me know.
Just curious here, why is you main system drive labeled F: and not C: ?



Two things you can do here:



1. Re-letter your system drive, it's easy to do in computer management then disk management, then right click on disk and change drive letter.



2. Create a new folder in your F: drive, name it Nvidia so that you know what it's all about. Then right click the driver file you have downloaded and "extract" or "un-zip" it to the new folder you just created. Then try to install from the new folder only, using the setup.exe file which should be present once fully unzipped. I use WinRAR for all zip files, but basic Windows should be able to handle this one. Also, pay close attention to your install options if any, note the destination!



Give it a shot and let me know.

#2
Posted 02/21/2012 07:46 PM   
I have the same problem. I also do not have a C drive. It looks like some tool programmer hard-coded the temp path rather than using %temp%, a local path, or even prompting the user for such. I am amazed a company like nVIDIA can make such a stupid mistake. This is amateur level stuff. /golfclap

The issue is specifically with nvcplsetupeng.exe. It does not matter where you unzip the installer, the setup file will try to create the folder at the specific path.

Quick workaround if you do not want to start renaming existing drives: Create a small partition (500MB or so) and name it C. Run the installer and delete the partition afterwards.
I have the same problem. I also do not have a C drive. It looks like some tool programmer hard-coded the temp path rather than using %temp%, a local path, or even prompting the user for such. I am amazed a company like nVIDIA can make such a stupid mistake. This is amateur level stuff. /golfclap



The issue is specifically with nvcplsetupeng.exe. It does not matter where you unzip the installer, the setup file will try to create the folder at the specific path.



Quick workaround if you do not want to start renaming existing drives: Create a small partition (500MB or so) and name it C. Run the installer and delete the partition afterwards.

#3
Posted 02/21/2012 08:30 PM   
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 03:30 PM' timestamp='1329856225' post='1372495']

Quick workaround if you do not want to start renaming existing drives: Create a small partition (500MB or so) and name it C. Run the installer and delete the partition afterwards.
[/quote]

Yeah, good point.

That's what I was thinking when I suggested creating a new folder in the specified path and just extracting there. Less evasive and should produce the same end result. But I don't have this issue, so I can't say either method works or not. But one of the 3 mentioned has to work, period.
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 03:30 PM' timestamp='1329856225' post='1372495']



Quick workaround if you do not want to start renaming existing drives: Create a small partition (500MB or so) and name it C. Run the installer and delete the partition afterwards.





Yeah, good point.



That's what I was thinking when I suggested creating a new folder in the specified path and just extracting there. Less evasive and should produce the same end result. But I don't have this issue, so I can't say either method works or not. But one of the 3 mentioned has to work, period.

#4
Posted 02/21/2012 08:50 PM   
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 08:50 PM' timestamp='1329857443' post='1372513']
Yeah, good point.

That's what I was thinking when I suggested creating a new folder in the specified path and just extracting there. Less evasive and should produce the same end result. But I don't have this issue, so I can't say either method works or not. But one of the 3 mentioned has to work, period.
[/quote]

The path cannot be created in the first place if no C drive is present.
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 08:50 PM' timestamp='1329857443' post='1372513']

Yeah, good point.



That's what I was thinking when I suggested creating a new folder in the specified path and just extracting there. Less evasive and should produce the same end result. But I don't have this issue, so I can't say either method works or not. But one of the 3 mentioned has to work, period.





The path cannot be created in the first place if no C drive is present.

#5
Posted 02/21/2012 08:58 PM   
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 03:58 PM' timestamp='1329857931' post='1372521']
The path cannot be created in the first place if no C drive is present.
[/quote]

Yes, which is why I mentioned paying close attention to the instal options. If the setup will not create the correct path during instal, then the user must do so manually. Since I just went through it myself a few min ago, I took a screen shot. The option for extraction does exist, it's up to the user to decide where.

[img]http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/4966/25540519.jpg[/img]

This is an updated driver for me, not that it will make any difference for how I use my PC. But it feels good to be updated,,,lol. Point is, if the driver in anyway shape or form requires a C: drive for instal, then your option is the only viable work around aside from changing the drive letter, which is to create a small partition C:. But I don't think you'll be able to delete it afterwards and still have a fully functional system without endless errors.

I was agreeing with your idea though, nothing more.
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 03:58 PM' timestamp='1329857931' post='1372521']

The path cannot be created in the first place if no C drive is present.





Yes, which is why I mentioned paying close attention to the instal options. If the setup will not create the correct path during instal, then the user must do so manually. Since I just went through it myself a few min ago, I took a screen shot. The option for extraction does exist, it's up to the user to decide where.



Image



This is an updated driver for me, not that it will make any difference for how I use my PC. But it feels good to be updated,,,lol. Point is, if the driver in anyway shape or form requires a C: drive for instal, then your option is the only viable work around aside from changing the drive letter, which is to create a small partition C:. But I don't think you'll be able to delete it afterwards and still have a fully functional system without endless errors.



I was agreeing with your idea though, nothing more.

#6
Posted 02/21/2012 09:45 PM   
That is not where the issue lies. That is only to extract the installer which works just fine if you choose a valid path. The installer itself needs a temp space allocated, which you cannot define as it is hard-coded. The problem is not with the .exe you download (your screenshot), but with the setup file extracted from this file.

The file you download extracts the setup files to a user-specified path. The setup files (specifically nvcplsetupeng.exe) then try to create a hard-coded temp path (C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp) for the actual installation of the driver and software.
That is not where the issue lies. That is only to extract the installer which works just fine if you choose a valid path. The installer itself needs a temp space allocated, which you cannot define as it is hard-coded. The problem is not with the .exe you download (your screenshot), but with the setup file extracted from this file.



The file you download extracts the setup files to a user-specified path. The setup files (specifically nvcplsetupeng.exe) then try to create a hard-coded temp path (C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp) for the actual installation of the driver and software.

#7
Posted 02/21/2012 10:36 PM   
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 09:45 PM' timestamp='1329860730' post='1372557']
Point is, if the driver in anyway shape or form requires a C: drive for instal, then your option is the only viable work around aside from changing the drive letter, which is to create a small partition C:. But I don't think you'll be able to delete it afterwards and still have a fully functional system without endless errors.
[/quote]

If you create a new partition called C: and do not use it for anything else, the method will not interfere with the installation of the driver or any other software. It will use system paths for program files and such correctly - it is just the temp folder that someone decided to hard-code. Remember the folder the setup is trying to create is a temp folder that is only used during the installation. Once the installation is completed the folder can be removed if the installer did not already do that.

Actually I might suspect the method of changing the system drive temporarily to C: can cause more harm than creating a new (temporary) partition. I am no expert in the inner workings of Windows 7, but if the nVIDIA installer puts any absolute paths into the registry that are on the current C drive, then it will potentially result in errors as you correctly mention.
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 09:45 PM' timestamp='1329860730' post='1372557']

Point is, if the driver in anyway shape or form requires a C: drive for instal, then your option is the only viable work around aside from changing the drive letter, which is to create a small partition C:. But I don't think you'll be able to delete it afterwards and still have a fully functional system without endless errors.





If you create a new partition called C: and do not use it for anything else, the method will not interfere with the installation of the driver or any other software. It will use system paths for program files and such correctly - it is just the temp folder that someone decided to hard-code. Remember the folder the setup is trying to create is a temp folder that is only used during the installation. Once the installation is completed the folder can be removed if the installer did not already do that.



Actually I might suspect the method of changing the system drive temporarily to C: can cause more harm than creating a new (temporary) partition. I am no expert in the inner workings of Windows 7, but if the nVIDIA installer puts any absolute paths into the registry that are on the current C drive, then it will potentially result in errors as you correctly mention.

#8
Posted 02/21/2012 10:48 PM   
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 05:36 PM' timestamp='1329863810' post='1372591']
That is not where the issue lies. That is only to extract the installer which works just fine if you choose a valid path. The installer itself needs a temp space allocated, which you cannot define as it is hard-coded. The problem is not with the .exe you download (your screenshot), but with the setup file extracted from this file.

The file you download extracts the setup files to a user-specified path. The setup files (specifically nvcplsetupeng.exe) then try to create a hard-coded temp path (C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp) for the actual installation of the driver and software.
[/quote]

My friend, there is no part of the original question nor any part thereafter that I misread or misunderstood. I offered 2 possible solutions and you offered 1, I agreed with you and said one of the three will solve the problem, period. Now it's up to Reav08 to choose his/her method. If you have specific information to add from experience installing this particular driver and have encountered the same exact problem, then Reav08 would like to know how you solved it. Otherwise, I can only guess as to a solution since I do not and did not have any issue installing this particular driver on my end on my system. Hard code or soft code or whatever, get it installed and working either way. That is the task at hand.
[quote name='Onsberg' date='21 February 2012 - 05:36 PM' timestamp='1329863810' post='1372591']

That is not where the issue lies. That is only to extract the installer which works just fine if you choose a valid path. The installer itself needs a temp space allocated, which you cannot define as it is hard-coded. The problem is not with the .exe you download (your screenshot), but with the setup file extracted from this file.



The file you download extracts the setup files to a user-specified path. The setup files (specifically nvcplsetupeng.exe) then try to create a hard-coded temp path (C:\Windows\Temp\NVIDIA\ControlPanelInstallerTemp) for the actual installation of the driver and software.





My friend, there is no part of the original question nor any part thereafter that I misread or misunderstood. I offered 2 possible solutions and you offered 1, I agreed with you and said one of the three will solve the problem, period. Now it's up to Reav08 to choose his/her method. If you have specific information to add from experience installing this particular driver and have encountered the same exact problem, then Reav08 would like to know how you solved it. Otherwise, I can only guess as to a solution since I do not and did not have any issue installing this particular driver on my end on my system. Hard code or soft code or whatever, get it installed and working either way. That is the task at hand.

#9
Posted 02/21/2012 11:16 PM   
Thanks for the replies but I decided to save myself the trouble (and any future inconveniences) by reinstalling Windows and unplugging all but one USB so it installs to C instead of F (why the OS sees any USB as a whole nother drive is beyond me). I will say it is irritating that nVidia have decided to hard code a temporary C path when their previous WHQLs never had a problem installing to a different drive.

To others having this problem and don't want to do a fresh copy of Windows I would recommend using Onsberg's temporary C drive solution, before I reinstalled I tried changing my drive's letter and it led to a very large amount of frustration and swearing. Again thanks for the replies and hopefully someone somewhere at this company will see this and change their coding for the following updates.
Thanks for the replies but I decided to save myself the trouble (and any future inconveniences) by reinstalling Windows and unplugging all but one USB so it installs to C instead of F (why the OS sees any USB as a whole nother drive is beyond me). I will say it is irritating that nVidia have decided to hard code a temporary C path when their previous WHQLs never had a problem installing to a different drive.



To others having this problem and don't want to do a fresh copy of Windows I would recommend using Onsberg's temporary C drive solution, before I reinstalled I tried changing my drive's letter and it led to a very large amount of frustration and swearing. Again thanks for the replies and hopefully someone somewhere at this company will see this and change their coding for the following updates.

#10
Posted 02/21/2012 11:29 PM   
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 11:16 PM' timestamp='1329866184' post='1372611']
My friend, there is no part of the original question nor any part thereafter that I misread or misunderstood. I offered 2 possible solutions and you offered 1, I agreed with you and said one of the three will solve the problem, period. Now it's up to Reav08 to choose his/her method. If you have specific information to add from experience installing this particular driver and have encountered the same exact problem, then Reav08 would like to know how you solved it. Otherwise, I can only guess as to a solution since I do not and did not have any issue installing this particular driver on my end on my system. Hard code or soft code or whatever, get it installed and working either way. That is the task at hand.
[/quote]

I created a small partition, called it C, ran the install, and deleted the partition afterwards. Worked like charm.
[quote name='t3t4' date='21 February 2012 - 11:16 PM' timestamp='1329866184' post='1372611']

My friend, there is no part of the original question nor any part thereafter that I misread or misunderstood. I offered 2 possible solutions and you offered 1, I agreed with you and said one of the three will solve the problem, period. Now it's up to Reav08 to choose his/her method. If you have specific information to add from experience installing this particular driver and have encountered the same exact problem, then Reav08 would like to know how you solved it. Otherwise, I can only guess as to a solution since I do not and did not have any issue installing this particular driver on my end on my system. Hard code or soft code or whatever, get it installed and working either way. That is the task at hand.





I created a small partition, called it C, ran the install, and deleted the partition afterwards. Worked like charm.

#11
Posted 02/21/2012 11:58 PM   
New to the forums. Found this page after googling this same issue. I have an H Drive after installing a new hard drive and just plain not noticing until it was too late. Never had an issue before with updates though as you just changed Drive to H at start of installation. I'm a complete numpty with PC's though so would rather not try these fixes so anyone think NVIDIA will actually re release the update themselves with a fix for this issue?

I have a GeForce 8800 on Windows XP.

Thank you.
New to the forums. Found this page after googling this same issue. I have an H Drive after installing a new hard drive and just plain not noticing until it was too late. Never had an issue before with updates though as you just changed Drive to H at start of installation. I'm a complete numpty with PC's though so would rather not try these fixes so anyone think NVIDIA will actually re release the update themselves with a fix for this issue?



I have a GeForce 8800 on Windows XP.



Thank you.

#12
Posted 02/22/2012 01:37 PM   
I have the same problem, with the driver installation simply failing with an unspecified error after removing all the previous NVidia drivers. However, my C drive is my C drive, so it's nothing to do with that. Now I'm DOA on graphics.
I have the same problem, with the driver installation simply failing with an unspecified error after removing all the previous NVidia drivers. However, my C drive is my C drive, so it's nothing to do with that. Now I'm DOA on graphics.

#13
Posted 02/22/2012 03:05 PM   
[quote name='zico' date='22 February 2012 - 01:37 PM' timestamp='1329917833' post='1373056']
New to the forums. Found this page after googling this same issue. I have an H Drive after installing a new hard drive and just plain not noticing until it was too late. Never had an issue before with updates though as you just changed Drive to H at start of installation. I'm a complete numpty with PC's though so would rather not try these fixes so anyone think NVIDIA will actually re release the update themselves with a fix for this issue?

I have a GeForce 8800 on Windows XP.

Thank you.
[/quote]
I doubt they will. Apparently this was also an issue back in december. Only thing you can do is submit an issue/bug and hope for the best.

[quote name='JLSigman' date='22 February 2012 - 03:05 PM' timestamp='1329923112' post='1373102']
I have the same problem, with the driver installation simply failing with an unspecified error after removing all the previous NVidia drivers. However, my C drive is my C drive, so it's nothing to do with that. Now I'm DOA on graphics.
[/quote]

Did you try to run it as admin? Sounds like a user rights issue for you.
[quote name='zico' date='22 February 2012 - 01:37 PM' timestamp='1329917833' post='1373056']

New to the forums. Found this page after googling this same issue. I have an H Drive after installing a new hard drive and just plain not noticing until it was too late. Never had an issue before with updates though as you just changed Drive to H at start of installation. I'm a complete numpty with PC's though so would rather not try these fixes so anyone think NVIDIA will actually re release the update themselves with a fix for this issue?



I have a GeForce 8800 on Windows XP.



Thank you.



I doubt they will. Apparently this was also an issue back in december. Only thing you can do is submit an issue/bug and hope for the best.

[quote name='JLSigman' date='22 February 2012 - 03:05 PM' timestamp='1329923112' post='1373102']

I have the same problem, with the driver installation simply failing with an unspecified error after removing all the previous NVidia drivers. However, my C drive is my C drive, so it's nothing to do with that. Now I'm DOA on graphics.





Did you try to run it as admin? Sounds like a user rights issue for you.

#14
Posted 02/22/2012 04:53 PM   
First, sorry for bad english.

I solved the same problem with my GTX 260 on WIN XP and the new driver 295.73. The setup also couldn't create a temp-folder on C:\, because all my system is running at H:\

I placed a mass-storage via USB, named this one C:\ and be suprised, the update runs without any mistake. Maybe its a solution without making a new partition C:\ on hard-drive.

Its just MY WAY for this problem.

Nice try

Stray
First, sorry for bad english.



I solved the same problem with my GTX 260 on WIN XP and the new driver 295.73. The setup also couldn't create a temp-folder on C:\, because all my system is running at H:\



I placed a mass-storage via USB, named this one C:\ and be suprised, the update runs without any mistake. Maybe its a solution without making a new partition C:\ on hard-drive.



Its just MY WAY for this problem.



Nice try



Stray

#15
Posted 02/23/2012 10:43 AM   
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