Peltier Integration
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Has anyone tried to integrate a peltier cooling plate into their watercooling loop be it on the cpu or graphics cards?
Has anyone tried to integrate a peltier cooling plate into their watercooling loop be it on the cpu or graphics cards?

#1
Posted 02/08/2012 03:38 PM   
I believe Swiftech makes a block with an integrated peltier cooling plate.
I believe Swiftech makes a block with an integrated peltier cooling plate.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#2
Posted 02/08/2012 07:58 PM   
[quote name='StAndrew' date='08 February 2012 - 01:58 PM' timestamp='1328731139' post='1367021']
I believe Swiftech makes a block with an integrated peltier cooling plate.
[/quote]
yea but it mostlikely doesnt do sub-zero temps and its prolly a air cooled heat exchanger
Nevermind it is watercooled but its only compatible with socket 775 and a few amd sockets
[quote name='StAndrew' date='08 February 2012 - 01:58 PM' timestamp='1328731139' post='1367021']

I believe Swiftech makes a block with an integrated peltier cooling plate.



yea but it mostlikely doesnt do sub-zero temps and its prolly a air cooled heat exchanger

Nevermind it is watercooled but its only compatible with socket 775 and a few amd sockets

#3
Posted 02/12/2012 02:05 PM   
Talk with their support, i think you can get a new bracket. It isnt a sub zero setup but i dont know of any other setup. I do know that it gets very cold.
Talk with their support, i think you can get a new bracket. It isnt a sub zero setup but i dont know of any other setup. I do know that it gets very cold.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#4
Posted 02/14/2012 02:59 AM   
[quote name='StAndrew' date='13 February 2012 - 08:59 PM' timestamp='1329188373' post='1369143']
Talk with their support, i think you can get a new bracket. It isnt a sub zero setup but i dont know of any other setup. I do know that it gets very cold.
[/quote]
thanks but i think i'm gonna take my chances and put together my own setup
[quote name='StAndrew' date='13 February 2012 - 08:59 PM' timestamp='1329188373' post='1369143']

Talk with their support, i think you can get a new bracket. It isnt a sub zero setup but i dont know of any other setup. I do know that it gets very cold.



thanks but i think i'm gonna take my chances and put together my own setup

#5
Posted 02/18/2012 04:27 AM   
Good luck, let us know how it goes. Search around, there are some pretty cool custom builds. Ive seen one that uses the plates to chill the water using a dual loop and two blocks pressed together.
Good luck, let us know how it goes. Search around, there are some pretty cool custom builds. Ive seen one that uses the plates to chill the water using a dual loop and two blocks pressed together.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#6
Posted 02/19/2012 06:48 PM   
[quote name='StAndrew' date='19 February 2012 - 12:48 PM' timestamp='1329677309' post='1371438']
Good luck, let us know how it goes. Search around, there are some pretty cool custom builds. Ive seen one that uses the plates to chill the water using a dual loop and two blocks pressed together.
[/quote]
Could you put a link on here to that build? And i was planning on using one plate on the CPU(s) and more on a reservoir for the GPU's so i can overclock the hell out of them as well, but them i'm gonna have to use some other blocks to cool the plates themselves and that's gonna be a challenge to mount them.
[quote name='StAndrew' date='19 February 2012 - 12:48 PM' timestamp='1329677309' post='1371438']

Good luck, let us know how it goes. Search around, there are some pretty cool custom builds. Ive seen one that uses the plates to chill the water using a dual loop and two blocks pressed together.



Could you put a link on here to that build? And i was planning on using one plate on the CPU(s) and more on a reservoir for the GPU's so i can overclock the hell out of them as well, but them i'm gonna have to use some other blocks to cool the plates themselves and that's gonna be a challenge to mount them.

#7
Posted 02/20/2012 03:02 AM   
I cant find the build, but basically what they did was marry up two blocks together with the cold plate in the middle. The first loop cooled the hot side of the plate and included the pump, block, and rads. The second loop just included the block on the CPU and on the cold side of the peltier plate. Obviously this is a bit complicated.

Also, a little waterchilling experiment with a GPU heat sync:

http://forums.vr-zone.com/project-logs/287226-chilled-water-cooling-loop-experiment.html
I cant find the build, but basically what they did was marry up two blocks together with the cold plate in the middle. The first loop cooled the hot side of the plate and included the pump, block, and rads. The second loop just included the block on the CPU and on the cold side of the peltier plate. Obviously this is a bit complicated.



Also, a little waterchilling experiment with a GPU heat sync:



http://forums.vr-zone.com/project-logs/287226-chilled-water-cooling-loop-experiment.html

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#8
Posted 02/20/2012 08:30 PM   
[quote name='StAndrew' date='20 February 2012 - 02:30 PM' timestamp='1329769837' post='1371941']
I cant find the build, but basically what they did was marry up two blocks together with the cold plate in the middle. The first loop cooled the hot side of the plate and included the pump, block, and rads. The second loop just included the block on the CPU and on the cold side of the peltier plate. Obviously this is a bit complicated.

Also, a little waterchilling experiment with a GPU heat sync:

http://forums.vr-zone.com/project-logs/287226-chilled-water-cooling-loop-experiment.html
[/quote]
pretty ghetto setup and a waste of money but yea thanks
[quote name='StAndrew' date='20 February 2012 - 02:30 PM' timestamp='1329769837' post='1371941']

I cant find the build, but basically what they did was marry up two blocks together with the cold plate in the middle. The first loop cooled the hot side of the plate and included the pump, block, and rads. The second loop just included the block on the CPU and on the cold side of the peltier plate. Obviously this is a bit complicated.



Also, a little waterchilling experiment with a GPU heat sync:



http://forums.vr-zone.com/project-logs/287226-chilled-water-cooling-loop-experiment.html



pretty ghetto setup and a waste of money but yea thanks

#9
Posted 02/21/2012 10:51 PM   
If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.

It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:

You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!

The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!

Ya gotta love Peltiers....
If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.



It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:



You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!



The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!



Ya gotta love Peltiers....

#10
Posted 02/26/2012 11:34 PM   
[quote name='t3t4' date='26 February 2012 - 05:34 PM' timestamp='1330299298' post='1375497']
If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.

It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:

You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!

The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!

Ya gotta love Peltiers....
[/quote]
Sounds pretty good but not the way I would go about it. But by the time I actually have enough to build my system I'm sure there will be a new extreme way to cool the system to sub-zero temps. What i would really like to do is get the sub-zero cooling from digital storm and use that for the cpu's, i'm waiting for the SR-X and the new 690's and it's gonna be a complete top of the line system. I'll most likely wait a little longer after everything comes out for the new higher-end EVGA or ASUS 690's
[quote name='t3t4' date='26 February 2012 - 05:34 PM' timestamp='1330299298' post='1375497']

If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.



It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:



You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!



The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!



Ya gotta love Peltiers....



Sounds pretty good but not the way I would go about it. But by the time I actually have enough to build my system I'm sure there will be a new extreme way to cool the system to sub-zero temps. What i would really like to do is get the sub-zero cooling from digital storm and use that for the cpu's, i'm waiting for the SR-X and the new 690's and it's gonna be a complete top of the line system. I'll most likely wait a little longer after everything comes out for the new higher-end EVGA or ASUS 690's

#11
Posted 02/27/2012 02:49 PM   
[quote name='t3t4' date='26 February 2012 - 06:34 PM' timestamp='1330299298' post='1375497']
If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.

It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:

You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!

The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!

Ya gotta love Peltiers....
[/quote]

Yes! I cant find the link to the build I saw, but I can tell you they didnt get sub zero temps.

[quote name='hammbone852' date='27 February 2012 - 09:49 AM' timestamp='1330354160' post='1375727']
Sounds pretty good but not the way I would go about it. But by the time I actually have enough to build my system I'm sure there will be a new extreme way to cool the system to sub-zero temps. What i would really like to do is get the sub-zero cooling from digital storm and use that for the cpu's, i'm waiting for the SR-X and the new 690's and it's gonna be a complete top of the line system. I'll most likely wait a little longer after everything comes out for the new higher-end EVGA or ASUS 690's
[/quote]

They just put a plate on the CPU. You can purchase your own plate and CPU block with out paying there overcharged prices. The problem with this setup, as mentioned by t3t4, is that once the heat pump capacity of the peltier is exceeded, it effectively stops working and the CPU can overheat (at this point, imagine just turning it off and having an insulator between your CPU and block). Because of this, you need to be very cautious how high your raise your voltage. If you use the plate to chill the water, you wont have to worry about plate becoming overwhelmed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
[quote name='t3t4' date='26 February 2012 - 06:34 PM' timestamp='1330299298' post='1375497']

If I had to do it all over again, I would use Peltier based water cooling since it could provide consistent stability. But unless I've missed something somewhere, most seem to be going about it the wrong way in terms of the way I would build a system.



It would require Two water systems per every peltier. One system cools the hot side of the peltier plate and the cold side of the plate is then used to cool a separate and secondary water system which in turn cools the CPU. I own quite a few thermoelectric/peltiers and have used them extensively over the years for various tasks. But one thing I learned early on is that they have a thermal limit that cannot be overcome and they become about useless when you breach that threshold! For example:



You cannot cool a room from 90 to 70 unless you have enough thermal capacity to do so. If you were to use a 3000BTU A/C unit for cooling a room that requires 12000BTU's, you will fail, period!



The same is true for peltiers. But in this case we can add peltiers just as we can add AC/units. Once we have the capacity/capability of removing the heat, then we can over-shoot which allows us to go from cool to cold... Using water as our heat transfer medium would allow for consistent and stable performance. One thing to note using peltiers, the cooler you keep the hot side, the colder the cold side becomes. If air cooled water is insufficient, then it's pretty easy to add geothermal cooling on the hot side for constant 50 degree temps. The more constant the hot side, the more constant the cold side!



Ya gotta love Peltiers....





Yes! I cant find the link to the build I saw, but I can tell you they didnt get sub zero temps.



[quote name='hammbone852' date='27 February 2012 - 09:49 AM' timestamp='1330354160' post='1375727']

Sounds pretty good but not the way I would go about it. But by the time I actually have enough to build my system I'm sure there will be a new extreme way to cool the system to sub-zero temps. What i would really like to do is get the sub-zero cooling from digital storm and use that for the cpu's, i'm waiting for the SR-X and the new 690's and it's gonna be a complete top of the line system. I'll most likely wait a little longer after everything comes out for the new higher-end EVGA or ASUS 690's





They just put a plate on the CPU. You can purchase your own plate and CPU block with out paying there overcharged prices. The problem with this setup, as mentioned by t3t4, is that once the heat pump capacity of the peltier is exceeded, it effectively stops working and the CPU can overheat (at this point, imagine just turning it off and having an insulator between your CPU and block). Because of this, you need to be very cautious how high your raise your voltage. If you use the plate to chill the water, you wont have to worry about plate becoming overwhelmed.



Good luck and let us know how it goes.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#12
Posted 02/28/2012 12:33 AM   
[quote name='StAndrew' date='27 February 2012 - 06:33 PM' timestamp='1330389187' post='1375937']
Yes! I cant find the link to the build I saw, but I can tell you they didnt get sub zero temps.



They just put a plate on the CPU. You can purchase your own plate and CPU block with out paying there overcharged prices. The problem with this setup, as mentioned by t3t4, is that once the heat pump capacity of the peltier is exceeded, it effectively stops working and the CPU can overheat (at this point, imagine just turning it off and having an insulator between your CPU and block). Because of this, you need to be very cautious how high your raise your voltage. If you use the plate to chill the water, you wont have to worry about plate becoming overwhelmed.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
[/quote]
Well I found some 400W Peltier plates so I'm sure that will be enough for the CPU's and I'll put like three of them on a bay reservoir for the GPU's and then some sort of multi block config to cool those. It'll be a pretty intense system but again I'm waiting for the new top end IVY bridge Xeon CPU's and, the SR-X from EVGA, and the 690's from Nvidia with another 680 for Physx I know that's way overkill but you know whatever, I'd rather have 0 bottlenecks and I'll also use a LSI MegaRaid card with 24 intel SSD's all in RAID 0, and yes I'm going for some world records.
[quote name='StAndrew' date='27 February 2012 - 06:33 PM' timestamp='1330389187' post='1375937']

Yes! I cant find the link to the build I saw, but I can tell you they didnt get sub zero temps.







They just put a plate on the CPU. You can purchase your own plate and CPU block with out paying there overcharged prices. The problem with this setup, as mentioned by t3t4, is that once the heat pump capacity of the peltier is exceeded, it effectively stops working and the CPU can overheat (at this point, imagine just turning it off and having an insulator between your CPU and block). Because of this, you need to be very cautious how high your raise your voltage. If you use the plate to chill the water, you wont have to worry about plate becoming overwhelmed.



Good luck and let us know how it goes.



Well I found some 400W Peltier plates so I'm sure that will be enough for the CPU's and I'll put like three of them on a bay reservoir for the GPU's and then some sort of multi block config to cool those. It'll be a pretty intense system but again I'm waiting for the new top end IVY bridge Xeon CPU's and, the SR-X from EVGA, and the 690's from Nvidia with another 680 for Physx I know that's way overkill but you know whatever, I'd rather have 0 bottlenecks and I'll also use a LSI MegaRaid card with 24 intel SSD's all in RAID 0, and yes I'm going for some world records.

#13
Posted 02/28/2012 01:57 AM   
[quote name='hammbone852' date='27 February 2012 - 08:57 PM' timestamp='1330394234' post='1375957']
Well I found some 400W Peltier plates so I'm sure that will be enough for the CPU's and I'll put like three of them on a bay reservoir for the GPU's and then some sort of multi block config to cool those. It'll be a pretty intense system but again I'm waiting for the new top end IVY bridge Xeon CPU's and, the SR-X from EVGA, and the 690's from Nvidia with another 680 for Physx I know that's way overkill but you know whatever, I'd rather have 0 bottlenecks and I'll also use a LSI MegaRaid card with 24 intel SSD's all in RAID 0, and yes I'm going for some world records.
[/quote]

My god man, I hope you're rich!

I had two 400 watt Peltiers, one of which I used directly on and old P4 2.6Ghz which I had clocked to 3.3 if memory serves me correctly. I could blow right through the cooling capacity of that peltier, but it did idle nice and cold in the low 20*f range. But once you apply a load and start working the system, ha, forget about it, it's 60's and 70's celsius all over again! I had the Peltier in direct contact with the CPU which in hind sight was not such a good idea. Point is: that rather large Peltier can keep your beer cold, but not your CPU, at least not for me it didn't. However, I'll bet 4 of them could do the job if set up properly, and water cooling is the only way I can see to make it happen. Use the Peltiers to cool the water, then let the water cool the CPU.

After all is said and done, you might find that it's just better to stick the whole PC into the kitchen freezer and call it day. But put your hard drives in the fridge behind the beer so you don't freeze your data. /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' />
[quote name='hammbone852' date='27 February 2012 - 08:57 PM' timestamp='1330394234' post='1375957']

Well I found some 400W Peltier plates so I'm sure that will be enough for the CPU's and I'll put like three of them on a bay reservoir for the GPU's and then some sort of multi block config to cool those. It'll be a pretty intense system but again I'm waiting for the new top end IVY bridge Xeon CPU's and, the SR-X from EVGA, and the 690's from Nvidia with another 680 for Physx I know that's way overkill but you know whatever, I'd rather have 0 bottlenecks and I'll also use a LSI MegaRaid card with 24 intel SSD's all in RAID 0, and yes I'm going for some world records.





My god man, I hope you're rich!



I had two 400 watt Peltiers, one of which I used directly on and old P4 2.6Ghz which I had clocked to 3.3 if memory serves me correctly. I could blow right through the cooling capacity of that peltier, but it did idle nice and cold in the low 20*f range. But once you apply a load and start working the system, ha, forget about it, it's 60's and 70's celsius all over again! I had the Peltier in direct contact with the CPU which in hind sight was not such a good idea. Point is: that rather large Peltier can keep your beer cold, but not your CPU, at least not for me it didn't. However, I'll bet 4 of them could do the job if set up properly, and water cooling is the only way I can see to make it happen. Use the Peltiers to cool the water, then let the water cool the CPU.



After all is said and done, you might find that it's just better to stick the whole PC into the kitchen freezer and call it day. But put your hard drives in the fridge behind the beer so you don't freeze your data. /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' />

#14
Posted 02/28/2012 05:33 AM   
I forgot to mention that most here are probably thinking watts = power or amperage. No, not in this case!

Cooling capacity can be measured in horse power, tons, BTU, watts, etc, but all methods describe how effective said component removes/transfers heat. In this case most specifically dealing with Peltier components, we typically find them rated in watts which describes their cooling capacity, not their current draw! So for the sake of visualization, here is an example:

You have a 30' x 30' room that you want cool from 90*F to 70*F. You have one 3,000 BTU air conditioner unit for the job. You will simply fail in this task since that size room according to shear heat load alone requires a 12,000 BTU air conditioner minimum! Add a person to the room and you've just changed the heat load, so now you need even more capacity. 400 watts is equal to about 1,300 BTU's. If you have a processor running at 90*F which is equal to 32*C, and you want to go from 90 to 70, the same rules/methodology applies! Know your heat load and choose your component/s according to your desired effect. If you seriously want sub-zero temps, then you'll need 5,000 BTU's or 1600 watts MINIMUM, or the kitchen freezer! Oh, and that's only likely to happen when the system is at idle. Otherwise, you'll be above 0*F under normal operating conditions. Keep in mind, we are not dealing with air in this case, rather surface temperature in a concentrated form.

This should hopefully give you some idea as to how far you must overshoot to achieve your desired effect.
I forgot to mention that most here are probably thinking watts = power or amperage. No, not in this case!



Cooling capacity can be measured in horse power, tons, BTU, watts, etc, but all methods describe how effective said component removes/transfers heat. In this case most specifically dealing with Peltier components, we typically find them rated in watts which describes their cooling capacity, not their current draw! So for the sake of visualization, here is an example:



You have a 30' x 30' room that you want cool from 90*F to 70*F. You have one 3,000 BTU air conditioner unit for the job. You will simply fail in this task since that size room according to shear heat load alone requires a 12,000 BTU air conditioner minimum! Add a person to the room and you've just changed the heat load, so now you need even more capacity. 400 watts is equal to about 1,300 BTU's. If you have a processor running at 90*F which is equal to 32*C, and you want to go from 90 to 70, the same rules/methodology applies! Know your heat load and choose your component/s according to your desired effect. If you seriously want sub-zero temps, then you'll need 5,000 BTU's or 1600 watts MINIMUM, or the kitchen freezer! Oh, and that's only likely to happen when the system is at idle. Otherwise, you'll be above 0*F under normal operating conditions. Keep in mind, we are not dealing with air in this case, rather surface temperature in a concentrated form.



This should hopefully give you some idea as to how far you must overshoot to achieve your desired effect.

#15
Posted 02/28/2012 10:21 PM   
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