Windows 7 and nVIDIA RAID controller issues Windows 7 will not recognize 2 nVIDIA contoller mirrored
My mother board has 6 SATA connectors, of which are capable of being mirrored.

I have 2 OCZ SSD drives, and 3 Seagate spindle drives - all of which are connected using SATA interfaces.

All mirrors to be mentioned are managed through the embedded nVIDIA RAID controller on my EVGA motherboard, an [b]122-CK-NF68[/b]. I believe that I am already running the latest BIOS, P33.

Even though there are three (3) spindle drives, I am only using 2 of them in a mirror set (originally on channels 0.0 and 0.1). That original mirror set had: C: (OS partition), D: (app partition) and E: (plain files, no apps, just downloads, word/excel documents, etc...). I will refer to this as [b]mirror0[/b].

The OCZ drives were recently acquired with the hopes of moving the C: partition onto it and resizing it from the original 40GB up to a total of 120GB (2 x 120 mirrored).

Using Acronis (a partition/disk imaging software) I restored the C: partition backup onto the new mirror (on channels 1.0 and 1.1). The image restore was mostly successful, with a couple of hiccups. I think it was my understanding of how Acronis worked, which is new to me. I will refer to this as [b]mirror1[/b]

The problem that is the focus of this post is that I can either see the SSD mirror or the spindle drive mirror, not both - ever.
[u][b]
POSSIBLY IMPORTANT CLUE:[/b][/u] After booting from one mirror, it seems to corrupt the boot record of the other mirror. In other words, if I successfully boot from [b]mirror0[/b] then [b]mirror1[/b] is not going to easily/straightforward and successfully boot. The opposite is also true.

If anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated. I have been fighting this issue for the last 4 days.
My mother board has 6 SATA connectors, of which are capable of being mirrored.



I have 2 OCZ SSD drives, and 3 Seagate spindle drives - all of which are connected using SATA interfaces.



All mirrors to be mentioned are managed through the embedded nVIDIA RAID controller on my EVGA motherboard, an 122-CK-NF68. I believe that I am already running the latest BIOS, P33.



Even though there are three (3) spindle drives, I am only using 2 of them in a mirror set (originally on channels 0.0 and 0.1). That original mirror set had: C: (OS partition), D: (app partition) and E: (plain files, no apps, just downloads, word/excel documents, etc...). I will refer to this as mirror0.



The OCZ drives were recently acquired with the hopes of moving the C: partition onto it and resizing it from the original 40GB up to a total of 120GB (2 x 120 mirrored).



Using Acronis (a partition/disk imaging software) I restored the C: partition backup onto the new mirror (on channels 1.0 and 1.1). The image restore was mostly successful, with a couple of hiccups. I think it was my understanding of how Acronis worked, which is new to me. I will refer to this as mirror1



The problem that is the focus of this post is that I can either see the SSD mirror or the spindle drive mirror, not both - ever.



POSSIBLY IMPORTANT CLUE:
After booting from one mirror, it seems to corrupt the boot record of the other mirror. In other words, if I successfully boot from mirror0 then mirror1 is not going to easily/straightforward and successfully boot. The opposite is also true.



If anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated. I have been fighting this issue for the last 4 days.

Warron

EVGA Motherboard 122-CK-NF68, BIOS=P33,

HDDs: 2@ OCZ Vertex3 SSD drives (mirrored), 2@ ST3750640AS (mirrored) + 1@ ST3750640AS (standalone),

RAM: 2@ 4GB DDR2 = 8GB RAM,

#1
Posted 01/05/2012 03:19 AM   
I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.
I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.
#2
Posted 01/05/2012 11:30 AM   
[quote name='bsh' date='05 January 2012 - 06:30 AM' timestamp='1325763050' post='1351854']
I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.
[/quote]

So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?

Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?

Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.


Thank you very much,
Warron
[quote name='bsh' date='05 January 2012 - 06:30 AM' timestamp='1325763050' post='1351854']

I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.





So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?



Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?



Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.





Thank you very much,

Warron

Warron

EVGA Motherboard 122-CK-NF68, BIOS=P33,

HDDs: 2@ OCZ Vertex3 SSD drives (mirrored), 2@ ST3750640AS (mirrored) + 1@ ST3750640AS (standalone),

RAM: 2@ 4GB DDR2 = 8GB RAM,

#3
Posted 01/13/2012 07:36 PM   
[quote name='bsh' date='05 January 2012 - 06:30 AM' timestamp='1325763050' post='1351854']
I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.
[/quote]

So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?

Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?

Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.


Thank you very much,
Warron
[quote name='bsh' date='05 January 2012 - 06:30 AM' timestamp='1325763050' post='1351854']

I've had a (probably) similar problem: was using a raid0 array for the OS (with 3 partitions), then moved the C: partition and the OS to a new SSD drive with acronis. After this I didn't see the original partition anymore (just the partition, the array was otherwise working). Problem was, in Acronis, the partition signature (which should be unique!) was also copied, so I had two exactly same partitions with the same signature (identifier) and Windows got confused to which it should order drive letters etc. I ended up changing the file system signature from under Linux.





So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?



Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?



Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.





Thank you very much,

Warron

Warron

EVGA Motherboard 122-CK-NF68, BIOS=P33,

HDDs: 2@ OCZ Vertex3 SSD drives (mirrored), 2@ ST3750640AS (mirrored) + 1@ ST3750640AS (standalone),

RAM: 2@ 4GB DDR2 = 8GB RAM,

#4
Posted 01/13/2012 07:36 PM   
[quote name='usapltrr' date='13 January 2012 - 08:36 PM' timestamp='1326483404' post='1355622']
So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?

Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?

Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.


Thank you very much,
Warron
[/quote]

No, I actually changed the ORIGINAL identifiers, because I don't know what would happen if I'd change the ID of the disk windows is actually running on. That solved the conflict too. After all, I didn't need the original anymore, once my system was running fine from the ssd. (After I made sure it is perfectly fine, I even formatted the old C: partition - that gave it a new ID anyway.)
However, I'm not saying this is your problem too! This is just a wild guess from me - probably worth a check, as it doesn't take long at all. But do it on your own risk.

This is what you do first:
- to check if the Disk ID's are unique or not:
[list=1]
[*] boot from a LiveCD (or LiveUSB), that has DMRAID and NTFS-3G already. (I guess any newer Ubuntu disk will have them on by default.)
[*] once there, open a terminal and become root by giving the command "sudo su"
[*] activate your Nforce RAID array with the help of DMRAID: simply type in "dmraid -ay". (they should be already detected and activated during boot, so this command will just list them.) You'll have to note what each array's name is, these will be some random letters after the initial path. an example: "/dev/mapper/nvidia_[color="#0000FF"]bijeidde[/color][color="#FF0000"]X[/color]", where the blue part will be random letters unique to each array, and the red X will be a one digit number, indicating the partition(s) on that array. you can also refer to this array and its partitions under the alias of "/dev/dm-1", "/dev/dm-2", etc. (just examples, actual numbers will vary)
[*] with FDISK, list the disk identifiers for each arrays, by typing this command: "fdisk -l /dev/mapper/nvidia_bijeidde" (the name you got from the list in the previous step. note: you can start typing the name and then press TAB, which will complete the command or list possible completions.) This will list the disk geometry and other useful things, amongs them is the disk identifier, look for something like: "Disk identifier: 0x00057c3b", where the hex number is a unique number for each disks.
[*] repeat step 4 for the other array, and compare the two disk identifiers. they have to be different.
[/list]
- to check if the Partition ID's are different:
[list=1]
[*]arrays must be activated with dmraid already (see above)
[*]to list the partition identifiers (called UUID's), simply use the command "blkid"
[*]look for the two instances of your (original and copied) C: partitions, and compare their UUID's.
[/list]

I'd say, just check these first and do not change anything. Maybe this is not your problem at all so no need to change anything.
[quote name='usapltrr' date='13 January 2012 - 08:36 PM' timestamp='1326483404' post='1355622']

So, you changed the file system signature on the new partition moved to the SSDs? If yes, what in Linux did you use to change the signature? Could you provide steps?



Do I need to boot from a Linux Live Boot/CD and mount the filesystem or just run a command against the partition to fix it?



Please help, I am still stuck, and I do not want to rebuild everything from scratch, assuming I can get all my data back after recovering.





Thank you very much,

Warron





No, I actually changed the ORIGINAL identifiers, because I don't know what would happen if I'd change the ID of the disk windows is actually running on. That solved the conflict too. After all, I didn't need the original anymore, once my system was running fine from the ssd. (After I made sure it is perfectly fine, I even formatted the old C: partition - that gave it a new ID anyway.)

However, I'm not saying this is your problem too! This is just a wild guess from me - probably worth a check, as it doesn't take long at all. But do it on your own risk.



This is what you do first:

- to check if the Disk ID's are unique or not:

[list=1]

  • boot from a LiveCD (or LiveUSB), that has DMRAID and NTFS-3G already. (I guess any newer Ubuntu disk will have them on by default.)
  • once there, open a terminal and become root by giving the command "sudo su"
  • activate your Nforce RAID array with the help of DMRAID: simply type in "dmraid -ay". (they should be already detected and activated during boot, so this command will just list them.) You'll have to note what each array's name is, these will be some random letters after the initial path. an example: "/dev/mapper/nvidia_bijeiddeX", where the blue part will be random letters unique to each array, and the red X will be a one digit number, indicating the partition(s) on that array. you can also refer to this array and its partitions under the alias of "/dev/dm-1", "/dev/dm-2", etc. (just examples, actual numbers will vary)
  • with FDISK, list the disk identifiers for each arrays, by typing this command: "fdisk -l /dev/mapper/nvidia_bijeidde" (the name you got from the list in the previous step. note: you can start typing the name and then press TAB, which will complete the command or list possible completions.) This will list the disk geometry and other useful things, amongs them is the disk identifier, look for something like: "Disk identifier: 0x00057c3b", where the hex number is a unique number for each disks.
  • repeat step 4 for the other array, and compare the two disk identifiers. they have to be different.
  • [/list]

    - to check if the Partition ID's are different:

    [list=1]

  • arrays must be activated with dmraid already (see above)
  • to list the partition identifiers (called UUID's), simply use the command "blkid"
  • look for the two instances of your (original and copied) C: partitions, and compare their UUID's.
  • [/list]



    I'd say, just check these first and do not change anything. Maybe this is not your problem at all so no need to change anything.
    #5
    Posted 01/16/2012 02:47 PM   
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