Sound via HDMI in FreeBSD
Hi,

I have tried getting XBMC to work on my ION platform using FreeBSD. It's a Zotac ION 330D mobo, with FreeBSD 8.2 amd64 and the nVidia 285 driver. I have it working fine in Linux, but it seems difficult to get especially audio to work in FreeBSD. I managed to get XBMC working with VDPAU and everything via HDMI, but not the audio.
FreeBSD finds the card like this on my box:
pcm0: <HDA NVidia MCP7A HDMI PCM #0 Digital> (play) default

So it looks good, it's the only card and it's the default, but it just doesn't work. I'm not sure exactly how it is supposed to work though(which driver is responsible for the audio?), but I have both modules loaded and the output listed above is set as default as you can see. So does anyone have a clue if the problem is with the nvidia driver, or if it is related to the snd_hda driver in FreeBSD?

By the way I've also tried other ways of getting the sound out via HDMI in FreeBSD, and it doesnt work with them either, so I dont think it has anything specific to do with XBMC. Everything works fine via the other audio outlets though. And as said it works fine in Linux via HDMI, so it is not a hardware, firmware or problem with other devices.
Hi,



I have tried getting XBMC to work on my ION platform using FreeBSD. It's a Zotac ION 330D mobo, with FreeBSD 8.2 amd64 and the nVidia 285 driver. I have it working fine in Linux, but it seems difficult to get especially audio to work in FreeBSD. I managed to get XBMC working with VDPAU and everything via HDMI, but not the audio.

FreeBSD finds the card like this on my box:

pcm0: <HDA NVidia MCP7A HDMI PCM #0 Digital> (play) default



So it looks good, it's the only card and it's the default, but it just doesn't work. I'm not sure exactly how it is supposed to work though(which driver is responsible for the audio?), but I have both modules loaded and the output listed above is set as default as you can see. So does anyone have a clue if the problem is with the nvidia driver, or if it is related to the snd_hda driver in FreeBSD?



By the way I've also tried other ways of getting the sound out via HDMI in FreeBSD, and it doesnt work with them either, so I dont think it has anything specific to do with XBMC. Everything works fine via the other audio outlets though. And as said it works fine in Linux via HDMI, so it is not a hardware, firmware or problem with other devices.

#1
Posted 12/20/2011 11:03 AM   
Is there a reason you cannot use a more stable BSD distro like PC BSD or Debian BSD or a true Unix like Solaris? You are using an unsupported niche FOSS OS, and without the massive community of Debian or the financial backers behind PCBSD --FreeBSD is highly unstable IMO. I personally view Free BSD as an OS only fit for entirely FOSS drivers (which Nvidia no longer provides) b/c you will likely need to modify the subsystem for your specific hardware and software needs.

I wouldn't even classify FreeBSD as free b/c you have to buy so much beer to get a working system that you could have bought a copy of Windows. --I jest, but in all seriousness you are going to be in for headaches with FreeBSD and Nvidia drivers.

I can verify that HDMI audio works in Debian BSD, PCBSD and Solaris, and I can attempt to reproduce your issues, but you will likely get better support by posting in the Free BSD forums.[url="http://forums.freebsd.org/"]http://forums.freebsd.org/[/url] If you are new to this be prepared for headaches; if you're a ringer --it's high time you joined the Free BSD community anyways. We only keep FOSS happening through taking care of our own.

If you are a member and they are also stumped then it may be time to rebuild from base. I know it's a PITA, but there comes a time when a base reinstall is necessary.

EDIT: Here is a list of a few other less hostile BSD OSes:

[url="http://www.debian.org/ports/kfreebsd-gnu/"]http://www.debian.org/ports/kfreebsd-gnu/[/url]
[url="http://www.debian.org/ports/netbsd/"]http://www.debian.org/ports/netbsd/[/url]
[url="http://www.pcbsd.org/"]http://www.pcbsd.org/[/url]

Here is a link to Solaris:

[url="http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html?ssSourceSiteId=ocomen"]http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html?ssSourceSiteId=ocomen[/url]
Is there a reason you cannot use a more stable BSD distro like PC BSD or Debian BSD or a true Unix like Solaris? You are using an unsupported niche FOSS OS, and without the massive community of Debian or the financial backers behind PCBSD --FreeBSD is highly unstable IMO. I personally view Free BSD as an OS only fit for entirely FOSS drivers (which Nvidia no longer provides) b/c you will likely need to modify the subsystem for your specific hardware and software needs.



I wouldn't even classify FreeBSD as free b/c you have to buy so much beer to get a working system that you could have bought a copy of Windows. --I jest, but in all seriousness you are going to be in for headaches with FreeBSD and Nvidia drivers.



I can verify that HDMI audio works in Debian BSD, PCBSD and Solaris, and I can attempt to reproduce your issues, but you will likely get better support by posting in the Free BSD forums.http://forums.freebsd.org/ If you are new to this be prepared for headaches; if you're a ringer --it's high time you joined the Free BSD community anyways. We only keep FOSS happening through taking care of our own.



If you are a member and they are also stumped then it may be time to rebuild from base. I know it's a PITA, but there comes a time when a base reinstall is necessary.



EDIT: Here is a list of a few other less hostile BSD OSes:



http://www.debian.org/ports/kfreebsd-gnu/

http://www.debian.org/ports/netbsd/

http://www.pcbsd.org/



Here is a link to Solaris:



http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html?ssSourceSiteId=ocomen

Done.

#2
Posted 12/20/2011 07:35 PM   
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='20 December 2011 - 07:35 PM' timestamp='1324409721' post='1344824']
Is there a reason you cannot use a more stable BSD distro like PC BSD or Debian BSD or a true Unix like Solaris? You are using an unsupported niche FOSS OS, and without the massive community of Debian or the financial backers behind PCBSD --FreeBSD is highly unstable IMO. I personally view Free BSD as an OS only fit for entirely FOSS drivers (which Nvidia no longer provides) b/c you will likely need to modify the subsystem for your specific hardware and software needs.

I wouldn't even classify FreeBSD as free b/c you have to buy so much beer to get a working system that you could have bought a copy of Windows. --I jest, but in all seriousness you are going to be in for headaches with FreeBSD and Nvidia drivers.

I can verify that HDMI audio works in Debian BSD, PCBSD and Solaris, and I can attempt to reproduce your issues, but you will likely get better support by posting in the Free BSD forums.[url="http://forums.freebsd.org/"]http://forums.freebsd.org/[/url] If you are new to this be prepared for headaches; if you're a ringer --it's high time you joined the Free BSD community anyways. We only keep FOSS happening through taking care of our own.

If you are a member and they are also stumped then it may be time to rebuild from base. I know it's a PITA, but there comes a time when a base reinstall is necessary.
[/quote]

FreeBSD is no more of a niche FOSS OS than Debian. FreeBSD is the most popular BSD distribution out there, and the most popular open platform for ZFS. It has been a very active open source project for about 20 years now, more than almost all Linux distros, so I dont get why you'd claim it to be unstable. It is also used by many large business including the likes of Yahoo, and the basis for many other operating systems like Apple Mac OSX, Junipers JunOS etc. PCBSD, Debian BSD and Solaris are truly niche though, no one really uses them.

You must have been very unfortunate with your FreeBSD setups as I've found them much simpler to maintain than most Linux distributions over the 15 years that I've used it, both professionally as well as for myself. And the nvidia drivers have worked well too, not that I've used it much as a desktop the last few years though.

I'm going to try a reinstall with 9.0 as soon as it is released by the way.

Also I did post in the FreeBSD forums first, but got referred here as the nvidia driver is a propritary one.
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='20 December 2011 - 07:35 PM' timestamp='1324409721' post='1344824']

Is there a reason you cannot use a more stable BSD distro like PC BSD or Debian BSD or a true Unix like Solaris? You are using an unsupported niche FOSS OS, and without the massive community of Debian or the financial backers behind PCBSD --FreeBSD is highly unstable IMO. I personally view Free BSD as an OS only fit for entirely FOSS drivers (which Nvidia no longer provides) b/c you will likely need to modify the subsystem for your specific hardware and software needs.



I wouldn't even classify FreeBSD as free b/c you have to buy so much beer to get a working system that you could have bought a copy of Windows. --I jest, but in all seriousness you are going to be in for headaches with FreeBSD and Nvidia drivers.



I can verify that HDMI audio works in Debian BSD, PCBSD and Solaris, and I can attempt to reproduce your issues, but you will likely get better support by posting in the Free BSD forums.http://forums.freebsd.org/ If you are new to this be prepared for headaches; if you're a ringer --it's high time you joined the Free BSD community anyways. We only keep FOSS happening through taking care of our own.



If you are a member and they are also stumped then it may be time to rebuild from base. I know it's a PITA, but there comes a time when a base reinstall is necessary.





FreeBSD is no more of a niche FOSS OS than Debian. FreeBSD is the most popular BSD distribution out there, and the most popular open platform for ZFS. It has been a very active open source project for about 20 years now, more than almost all Linux distros, so I dont get why you'd claim it to be unstable. It is also used by many large business including the likes of Yahoo, and the basis for many other operating systems like Apple Mac OSX, Junipers JunOS etc. PCBSD, Debian BSD and Solaris are truly niche though, no one really uses them.



You must have been very unfortunate with your FreeBSD setups as I've found them much simpler to maintain than most Linux distributions over the 15 years that I've used it, both professionally as well as for myself. And the nvidia drivers have worked well too, not that I've used it much as a desktop the last few years though.



I'm going to try a reinstall with 9.0 as soon as it is released by the way.



Also I did post in the FreeBSD forums first, but got referred here as the nvidia driver is a propritary one.

#3
Posted 12/22/2011 07:24 PM   
[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
FreeBSD is no more of a niche FOSS OS than Debian.
[/quote]


I beg to differ.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
FreeBSD is the most popular BSD distribution out there, and the most popular open platform for ZFS.
[/quote]

Did you forget about Macs?

I understand your point, but FreeBSD is more useful in being a basis for building another custom platform as opposed to a finished product.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
It has been a very active open source project for about 20 years now, more than almost all Linux distros, so I dont get why you'd claim it to be unstable.
[/quote]

FreeBSD has earned it's reputation for user hostility and incompatibility. It's a rock when set up properly, but it's list of incompatibilities is a long one.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
It is also used by many large business including the likes of Yahoo, and the basis for many other operating systems like Apple Mac OSX, Junipers JunOS etc.
[/quote]

You'll get no argument that FreeBSD is a great foundation for a custom platform, but it's not OOB ready for anything (that's kind of the point TBH)

MacOS is based on NextStep and uses a kernel from UC Berkeley as opposed to the FreeBSD project. (I work in IP and specialize in Unix.)

Debian has 3 different BSD kernels BTW.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
PCBSD, Debian BSD and Solaris are truly niche though, no one really uses them.
[/quote]

PCBSD could be huge if not for the fact that BSD itself scares people off.

Debain BSD is an experiment, but for what you want to do is better due to the larger support community.

No one uses Solaris? Really? Oracle paid a couple billion to get their hands on an OS no one uses? That's pretty absurd to even claim.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
You must have been very unfortunate with your FreeBSD setups as I've found them much simpler to maintain than most Linux distributions over the 15 years that I've used it, both professionally as well as for myself. And the nvidia drivers have worked well too, not that I've used it much as a desktop the last few years though.
[/quote]

Linux has gotten super simple as of late --Ubuntu and SLED are up with Windows and MacOS in quality user experience these days. Solaris is too.

I personally have zero issues with either --I know enough about OSes to give you a couple recommendations. I offered to replicate your issue and your response was to debate with me.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
I'm going to try a reinstall with 9.0 as soon as it is released by the way.
[/quote]

Reinstalling to base is probably your best bet TBH. You've got driver conflicts going on.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']
Also I did post in the FreeBSD forums first, but got referred here as the nvidia driver is a propritary one.
[/quote]

You're in the community support forums and the Unix guys here are few. There are a few more Linux guys, but BSD is another animal to Linux guys.

If you would like to not argue I can still try and replicate your issue to help you, but I'm in no mood to argue.
[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

FreeBSD is no more of a niche FOSS OS than Debian.







I beg to differ.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

FreeBSD is the most popular BSD distribution out there, and the most popular open platform for ZFS.





Did you forget about Macs?



I understand your point, but FreeBSD is more useful in being a basis for building another custom platform as opposed to a finished product.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

It has been a very active open source project for about 20 years now, more than almost all Linux distros, so I dont get why you'd claim it to be unstable.





FreeBSD has earned it's reputation for user hostility and incompatibility. It's a rock when set up properly, but it's list of incompatibilities is a long one.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

It is also used by many large business including the likes of Yahoo, and the basis for many other operating systems like Apple Mac OSX, Junipers JunOS etc.





You'll get no argument that FreeBSD is a great foundation for a custom platform, but it's not OOB ready for anything (that's kind of the point TBH)



MacOS is based on NextStep and uses a kernel from UC Berkeley as opposed to the FreeBSD project. (I work in IP and specialize in Unix.)



Debian has 3 different BSD kernels BTW.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

PCBSD, Debian BSD and Solaris are truly niche though, no one really uses them.





PCBSD could be huge if not for the fact that BSD itself scares people off.



Debain BSD is an experiment, but for what you want to do is better due to the larger support community.



No one uses Solaris? Really? Oracle paid a couple billion to get their hands on an OS no one uses? That's pretty absurd to even claim.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

You must have been very unfortunate with your FreeBSD setups as I've found them much simpler to maintain than most Linux distributions over the 15 years that I've used it, both professionally as well as for myself. And the nvidia drivers have worked well too, not that I've used it much as a desktop the last few years though.





Linux has gotten super simple as of late --Ubuntu and SLED are up with Windows and MacOS in quality user experience these days. Solaris is too.



I personally have zero issues with either --I know enough about OSes to give you a couple recommendations. I offered to replicate your issue and your response was to debate with me.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

I'm going to try a reinstall with 9.0 as soon as it is released by the way.





Reinstalling to base is probably your best bet TBH. You've got driver conflicts going on.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 01:24 PM' timestamp='1324581856' post='1345936']

Also I did post in the FreeBSD forums first, but got referred here as the nvidia driver is a propritary one.





You're in the community support forums and the Unix guys here are few. There are a few more Linux guys, but BSD is another animal to Linux guys.



If you would like to not argue I can still try and replicate your issue to help you, but I'm in no mood to argue.

Done.

#4
Posted 12/22/2011 07:57 PM   
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

Did you forget about Macs?

I understand your point, but FreeBSD is more useful in being a basis for building another custom platform as opposed to a finished product.
[/quote]

I don't think anyone would claim OSX == BSD. Though parts of it was based on BSD internals, such as the TCP/IP stack. They also had a project to implement ZFS in OSX a couple of years ago, but unfortunately it was killed off just before the final release. Anyhow a fun fact is that one of the guys who started the FreeBSD project back in 1993, Jordan Hubbard, is nowadays ""Director of Engineering of Unix Technologies" at Apple.


[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']
FreeBSD has earned it's reputation for user hostility and incompatibility. It's a rock when set up properly, but it's list of incompatibilities is a long one.

You'll get no argument that FreeBSD is a great foundation for a custom platform, but it's not OOB ready for anything (that's kind of the point TBH)
[/quote]
I would say its the most userfriendly, not counting OSX(by the way I'm writing this on my Macbook Air), and compatible unix there is. There is solid support for running applications built for Linux, in the unlikely event that the ports system wouldn't suit your needs, and if you're used to Linux you'll learn it very fast. And who doesn't like ZFS? FreeBSD is the only major open source OS to offer solid support for it. I'd say it's the only OS thats perfect for a homeserver OOTB.


[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']
No one uses Solaris? Really? Oracle paid a couple billion to get their hands on an OS no one uses? That's pretty absurd to even claim.
[/quote]
Sure it's a somewhat popular choice among businesses running Unix systems, but at home? No way.

[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']
Linux has gotten super simple as of late --Ubuntu and SLED are up with Windows and MacOS in quality user experience these days. Solaris is too.

I personally have zero issues with either --I know enough about OSes to give you a couple recommendations. I offered to replicate your issue and your response was to debate with me.
[/quote]
I'm a long time Linux user, I started with Slackware before I found FreeBSD, and have continued to use it as well. Everything from Redhat to Debian to Sorcerer to Gentoo to Ubuntu etc etc have passed by over close to 20 years now.. I have used Solaris from time to time too, but the only thing I really like in Solaris is ZFS, and I get that in FreeBSD nowadays too.

[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']
Reinstalling to base is probably your best bet TBH. You've got driver conflicts going on.
[/quote]
I doubt it. All you should supposedly need to do is install the nvidia driver, which is what I did. But I think the issue is either in the nvidia driver or in the intel hda driver in freebsd, and I'm hoping the later one is updated in 9.0. I doubt it though.

[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']
You're in the community support forums and the Unix guys here are few. There are a few more Linux guys, but BSD is another animal to Linux guys.

If you would like to not argue I can still try and replicate your issue to help you, but I'm in no mood to argue.
[/quote]
I would say a lot of linux guys, at least old school ones with any clue, are usually quite comfortable with BSD as well. At least that's my take on it after having worked as a *nix admin for many years for various outsourcing companies. (Nowadays I work with virtualization infrastructure though, so the professional *nix days for me are pretty much over. I just still like to tinker with it at home sometimes)

Anyhow, if you would like to help then that would of course be much appreciated. :-)

PS. If you didn't like to argue then you wouldn't have replied to my initial post the way you did. ;-)
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']



Did you forget about Macs?



I understand your point, but FreeBSD is more useful in being a basis for building another custom platform as opposed to a finished product.





I don't think anyone would claim OSX == BSD. Though parts of it was based on BSD internals, such as the TCP/IP stack. They also had a project to implement ZFS in OSX a couple of years ago, but unfortunately it was killed off just before the final release. Anyhow a fun fact is that one of the guys who started the FreeBSD project back in 1993, Jordan Hubbard, is nowadays ""Director of Engineering of Unix Technologies" at Apple.





[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

FreeBSD has earned it's reputation for user hostility and incompatibility. It's a rock when set up properly, but it's list of incompatibilities is a long one.



You'll get no argument that FreeBSD is a great foundation for a custom platform, but it's not OOB ready for anything (that's kind of the point TBH)



I would say its the most userfriendly, not counting OSX(by the way I'm writing this on my Macbook Air), and compatible unix there is. There is solid support for running applications built for Linux, in the unlikely event that the ports system wouldn't suit your needs, and if you're used to Linux you'll learn it very fast. And who doesn't like ZFS? FreeBSD is the only major open source OS to offer solid support for it. I'd say it's the only OS thats perfect for a homeserver OOTB.





[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

No one uses Solaris? Really? Oracle paid a couple billion to get their hands on an OS no one uses? That's pretty absurd to even claim.



Sure it's a somewhat popular choice among businesses running Unix systems, but at home? No way.



[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

Linux has gotten super simple as of late --Ubuntu and SLED are up with Windows and MacOS in quality user experience these days. Solaris is too.



I personally have zero issues with either --I know enough about OSes to give you a couple recommendations. I offered to replicate your issue and your response was to debate with me.



I'm a long time Linux user, I started with Slackware before I found FreeBSD, and have continued to use it as well. Everything from Redhat to Debian to Sorcerer to Gentoo to Ubuntu etc etc have passed by over close to 20 years now.. I have used Solaris from time to time too, but the only thing I really like in Solaris is ZFS, and I get that in FreeBSD nowadays too.



[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

Reinstalling to base is probably your best bet TBH. You've got driver conflicts going on.



I doubt it. All you should supposedly need to do is install the nvidia driver, which is what I did. But I think the issue is either in the nvidia driver or in the intel hda driver in freebsd, and I'm hoping the later one is updated in 9.0. I doubt it though.



[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 07:57 PM' timestamp='1324583875' post='1345952']

You're in the community support forums and the Unix guys here are few. There are a few more Linux guys, but BSD is another animal to Linux guys.



If you would like to not argue I can still try and replicate your issue to help you, but I'm in no mood to argue.



I would say a lot of linux guys, at least old school ones with any clue, are usually quite comfortable with BSD as well. At least that's my take on it after having worked as a *nix admin for many years for various outsourcing companies. (Nowadays I work with virtualization infrastructure though, so the professional *nix days for me are pretty much over. I just still like to tinker with it at home sometimes)



Anyhow, if you would like to help then that would of course be much appreciated. :-)



PS. If you didn't like to argue then you wouldn't have replied to my initial post the way you did. ;-)

#5
Posted 12/22/2011 09:43 PM   
[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
Anyhow, if you would like to help then that would of course be much appreciated. :-)
[/quote]

I've got an ION 2 Asus netbook and I'll go ahead and install on it when I get home from work.


[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
PS. If you didn't like to argue then you wouldn't have replied to my initial post the way you did. ;-)
[/quote]


I was rather clear about the slapstick nature of my first post. These forums are mostly teens and early 20s so the tone is different.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
I don't think anyone would claim OSX == BSD. Though parts of it was based on BSD internals, such as the TCP/IP stack. They also had a project to implement ZFS in OSX a couple of years ago, but unfortunately it was killed off just before the final release. Anyhow a fun fact is that one of the guys who started the FreeBSD project back in 1993, Jordan Hubbard, is nowadays ""Director of Engineering of Unix Technologies" at Apple.
[/quote]

He;s mostly serverside from what I understand.

Anyways IIRC the sandbox that was introed in Lion lost them their Unix cert which would revert them to a unix-like BSD with two custom APIs. This is all semantics but I'm more keen to call OSX a BSD than anything else.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
I would say its the most userfriendly, not counting OSX(by the way I'm writing this on my Macbook Air), and compatible unix there is. There is solid support for running applications built for Linux, in the unlikely event that the ports system wouldn't suit your needs, and if you're used to Linux you'll learn it very fast. And who doesn't like ZFS? FreeBSD is the only major open source OS to offer solid support for it. I'd say it's the only OS thats perfect for a homeserver OOTB.
[/quote]

I'm very familiar with BSD though I prefer Solaris or using the current Berkeley kernel and a custom system. BSD is far less optimized than SLED for day to day use on a desktop.

OOB MS has some good home offerings and SUSE is amazing. I run an enterprise setup at the house but that for my own piece of mind more than anything else.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
Sure it's a somewhat popular choice among businesses running Unix systems, but at home? No way.
[/quote]

Still it's not niche. It's what I prefer to anything else these days, and TBH I couldn't imagine using anything but a real Unix. I like Windows 7 a lot and game on it, I use SLED for MS compatibility and the netware tools at times too --but Unix is still the most secure and stable OS on the planet which makes Solaris the only x86 choice (even if I do hate Oracle.)

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
I'm a long time Linux user, I started with Slackware before I found FreeBSD, and have continued to use it as well. Everything from Redhat to Debian to Sorcerer to Gentoo to Ubuntu etc etc have passed by over close to 20 years now.. I have used Solaris from time to time too, but the only thing I really like in Solaris is ZFS, and I get that in FreeBSD nowadays too.
[/quote]

You've got your favorite OS and are keen to defend it. I get that, but you are going to run into Nvidia driver hell more and more as Nvidia dropped their FOSS support for everything but Linux. AFIK they only test it on RPM and DEB distros too.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
I doubt it. All you should supposedly need to do is install the nvidia driver, which is what I did. But I think the issue is either in the nvidia driver or in the intel hda driver in freebsd, and I'm hoping the later one is updated in 9.0. I doubt it though.
[/quote]

Have you done a fetch of the ION self compiler drivers? YOu could be running OOD drivers for both your CPU and GPU. Unless you're running a switchable GPU setup you should be able to install the latest for both that Intel CPU and ION GPU though alternate sources.

For future reference: you should run an all Intel setup in BSD if possible as Nvidia support for alternate OSes is lacking for all but Quaddros. AMD provides some good systems, but with them it's best to be 2 generations behind the current offerings.

[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']
I would say a lot of linux guys, at least old school ones with any clue, are usually quite comfortable with BSD as well. At least that's my take on it after having worked as a *nix admin for many years for various outsourcing companies. (Nowadays I work with virtualization infrastructure though, so the professional *nix days for me are pretty much over. I just still like to tinker with it at home sometimes)
[/quote]

I've been using Unix as my primary home OS since the AT&T Unix PC. I used the GNU on top of that kernel for a while b/c of the dropped support and then compiled the Linux kernel myself. I've found that using a raw Unix kernel is preferable in every way shape and form to the derivatives (including BSD) though the modular nature of newer Linux kernels is hard to beat.

I would recommend IBM system P as the ultimate virtualization system to anyone who asked with price being the only real limiting factor.

I'm an unashamed IBM fan though and ooze excitement with every new system Z and system P release.



I've been doing this for a while too, and will be glad to help you :)
[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

Anyhow, if you would like to help then that would of course be much appreciated. :-)





I've got an ION 2 Asus netbook and I'll go ahead and install on it when I get home from work.





[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

PS. If you didn't like to argue then you wouldn't have replied to my initial post the way you did. ;-)







I was rather clear about the slapstick nature of my first post. These forums are mostly teens and early 20s so the tone is different.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

I don't think anyone would claim OSX == BSD. Though parts of it was based on BSD internals, such as the TCP/IP stack. They also had a project to implement ZFS in OSX a couple of years ago, but unfortunately it was killed off just before the final release. Anyhow a fun fact is that one of the guys who started the FreeBSD project back in 1993, Jordan Hubbard, is nowadays ""Director of Engineering of Unix Technologies" at Apple.





He;s mostly serverside from what I understand.



Anyways IIRC the sandbox that was introed in Lion lost them their Unix cert which would revert them to a unix-like BSD with two custom APIs. This is all semantics but I'm more keen to call OSX a BSD than anything else.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

I would say its the most userfriendly, not counting OSX(by the way I'm writing this on my Macbook Air), and compatible unix there is. There is solid support for running applications built for Linux, in the unlikely event that the ports system wouldn't suit your needs, and if you're used to Linux you'll learn it very fast. And who doesn't like ZFS? FreeBSD is the only major open source OS to offer solid support for it. I'd say it's the only OS thats perfect for a homeserver OOTB.





I'm very familiar with BSD though I prefer Solaris or using the current Berkeley kernel and a custom system. BSD is far less optimized than SLED for day to day use on a desktop.



OOB MS has some good home offerings and SUSE is amazing. I run an enterprise setup at the house but that for my own piece of mind more than anything else.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

Sure it's a somewhat popular choice among businesses running Unix systems, but at home? No way.





Still it's not niche. It's what I prefer to anything else these days, and TBH I couldn't imagine using anything but a real Unix. I like Windows 7 a lot and game on it, I use SLED for MS compatibility and the netware tools at times too --but Unix is still the most secure and stable OS on the planet which makes Solaris the only x86 choice (even if I do hate Oracle.)



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

I'm a long time Linux user, I started with Slackware before I found FreeBSD, and have continued to use it as well. Everything from Redhat to Debian to Sorcerer to Gentoo to Ubuntu etc etc have passed by over close to 20 years now.. I have used Solaris from time to time too, but the only thing I really like in Solaris is ZFS, and I get that in FreeBSD nowadays too.





You've got your favorite OS and are keen to defend it. I get that, but you are going to run into Nvidia driver hell more and more as Nvidia dropped their FOSS support for everything but Linux. AFIK they only test it on RPM and DEB distros too.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

I doubt it. All you should supposedly need to do is install the nvidia driver, which is what I did. But I think the issue is either in the nvidia driver or in the intel hda driver in freebsd, and I'm hoping the later one is updated in 9.0. I doubt it though.





Have you done a fetch of the ION self compiler drivers? YOu could be running OOD drivers for both your CPU and GPU. Unless you're running a switchable GPU setup you should be able to install the latest for both that Intel CPU and ION GPU though alternate sources.



For future reference: you should run an all Intel setup in BSD if possible as Nvidia support for alternate OSes is lacking for all but Quaddros. AMD provides some good systems, but with them it's best to be 2 generations behind the current offerings.



[quote name='taliz' date='22 December 2011 - 03:43 PM' timestamp='1324590239' post='1346018']

I would say a lot of linux guys, at least old school ones with any clue, are usually quite comfortable with BSD as well. At least that's my take on it after having worked as a *nix admin for many years for various outsourcing companies. (Nowadays I work with virtualization infrastructure though, so the professional *nix days for me are pretty much over. I just still like to tinker with it at home sometimes)





I've been using Unix as my primary home OS since the AT&T Unix PC. I used the GNU on top of that kernel for a while b/c of the dropped support and then compiled the Linux kernel myself. I've found that using a raw Unix kernel is preferable in every way shape and form to the derivatives (including BSD) though the modular nature of newer Linux kernels is hard to beat.



I would recommend IBM system P as the ultimate virtualization system to anyone who asked with price being the only real limiting factor.



I'm an unashamed IBM fan though and ooze excitement with every new system Z and system P release.







I've been doing this for a while too, and will be glad to help you :)

Done.

#6
Posted 12/22/2011 11:12 PM   
Can I get you to plase post your current setup?
Can I get you to plase post your current setup?

Done.

#7
Posted 12/23/2011 09:36 AM   
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 11:12 PM' timestamp='1324595559' post='1346070']
I've got an ION 2 Asus netbook and I'll go ahead and install on it when I get home from work.
[/quote]
Great! I don't really know how much the ION and ION 2 differ, but hopefully they're close.


[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 11:12 PM' timestamp='1324595559' post='1346070']
Have you done a fetch of the ION self compiler drivers? YOu could be running OOD drivers for both your CPU and GPU. Unless you're running a switchable GPU setup you should be able to install the latest for both that Intel CPU and ION GPU though alternate sources.

For future reference: you should run an all Intel setup in BSD if possible as Nvidia support for alternate OSes is lacking for all but Quaddros. AMD provides some good systems, but with them it's best to be 2 generations behind the current offerings.
[/quote]
I haven't looked into compiling anything else than the nvidia drivers yet. I think I need to find out exactly how the sound system is supposed to work nowadays in FreeBSD(been years since I used it as a desktop). Anyhow the reason I use the ION platform is because its perfect for a HTPC setup, as its small and consumes very little power + you get VDPAU support so the GPU offloads decoding of HD content. I've been running Ubuntu on it for about 2 years now with XBMC, and I have a separate server with FreeBSD and ZFS as a fileserver, timemachine target, irc bouncer, torrentbox etc etc. And I recently noticed that XBMC was in the FreeBSD ports, so I figured I could combine the two machines into one, to save some more on the power bill.

[quote name='D1llw33d' date='23 December 2011 - 09:36 AM' timestamp='1324632974' post='1346277']
Can I get you to plase post your current setup?
[/quote]
Of course. The board I have is this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813500030
It's got a 2GB DDR2 stick and a 120GB 2,5" HDD in it.
I've attached a dmesg as well.
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 11:12 PM' timestamp='1324595559' post='1346070']

I've got an ION 2 Asus netbook and I'll go ahead and install on it when I get home from work.



Great! I don't really know how much the ION and ION 2 differ, but hopefully they're close.





[quote name='D1llw33d' date='22 December 2011 - 11:12 PM' timestamp='1324595559' post='1346070']

Have you done a fetch of the ION self compiler drivers? YOu could be running OOD drivers for both your CPU and GPU. Unless you're running a switchable GPU setup you should be able to install the latest for both that Intel CPU and ION GPU though alternate sources.



For future reference: you should run an all Intel setup in BSD if possible as Nvidia support for alternate OSes is lacking for all but Quaddros. AMD provides some good systems, but with them it's best to be 2 generations behind the current offerings.



I haven't looked into compiling anything else than the nvidia drivers yet. I think I need to find out exactly how the sound system is supposed to work nowadays in FreeBSD(been years since I used it as a desktop). Anyhow the reason I use the ION platform is because its perfect for a HTPC setup, as its small and consumes very little power + you get VDPAU support so the GPU offloads decoding of HD content. I've been running Ubuntu on it for about 2 years now with XBMC, and I have a separate server with FreeBSD and ZFS as a fileserver, timemachine target, irc bouncer, torrentbox etc etc. And I recently noticed that XBMC was in the FreeBSD ports, so I figured I could combine the two machines into one, to save some more on the power bill.



[quote name='D1llw33d' date='23 December 2011 - 09:36 AM' timestamp='1324632974' post='1346277']

Can I get you to plase post your current setup?



Of course. The board I have is this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813500030

It's got a 2GB DDR2 stick and a 120GB 2,5" HDD in it.

I've attached a dmesg as well.

#8
Posted 12/23/2011 03:06 PM   
I'm getting HDMI sound OOB with the latest download from the FreeBSD Homepage. I'm running ION 2 however which means I'm using a DDR3 system with a different 210 GPU. Let me do some more digging to see if there is a specific ION 1 compatibility issue.
I'm getting HDMI sound OOB with the latest download from the FreeBSD Homepage. I'm running ION 2 however which means I'm using a DDR3 system with a different 210 GPU. Let me do some more digging to see if there is a specific ION 1 compatibility issue.

Done.

#9
Posted 12/24/2011 05:57 AM   
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='24 December 2011 - 05:57 AM' timestamp='1324706225' post='1346650']
I'm getting HDMI sound OOB with the latest download from the FreeBSD Homepage. I'm running ION 2 however which means I'm using a DDR3 system with a different 210 GPU. Let me do some more digging to see if there is a specific ION 1 compatibility issue.
[/quote]

Interesting. Did you use 8.2 or 9.0RC3? i386 or amd64? Which version of the nvidia driver?
[quote name='D1llw33d' date='24 December 2011 - 05:57 AM' timestamp='1324706225' post='1346650']

I'm getting HDMI sound OOB with the latest download from the FreeBSD Homepage. I'm running ION 2 however which means I'm using a DDR3 system with a different 210 GPU. Let me do some more digging to see if there is a specific ION 1 compatibility issue.





Interesting. Did you use 8.2 or 9.0RC3? i386 or amd64? Which version of the nvidia driver?

#10
Posted 12/24/2011 02:41 PM   
[quote name='taliz' date='24 December 2011 - 08:41 AM' timestamp='1324737700' post='1346746']
Interesting. Did you use 8.2 or 9.0RC3? i386 or amd64? Which version of the nvidia driver?
[/quote]

i386 8.2 [url="http://www.nvidia.com/object/freebsd-x86-275.43-driver.html"]http://www.nvidia.com/object/freebsd-x86-275.43-driver.html[/url]
[quote name='taliz' date='24 December 2011 - 08:41 AM' timestamp='1324737700' post='1346746']

Interesting. Did you use 8.2 or 9.0RC3? i386 or amd64? Which version of the nvidia driver?





i386 8.2 http://www.nvidia.com/object/freebsd-x86-275.43-driver.html

Done.

#11
Posted 12/24/2011 04:28 PM   
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