SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial A Righthooks Tutorial
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[center][size="6"]Righthooks Guide To Lightning Fast SSD With Unlimited Storage [/size][/center]

Welcome to another Righthooks tutorial. Throughout the course of this guide you will learn how to configure your Solid State Drives in TRUE 128k RAID 0 Stripe. In addition, you will learn how to manipulate a “high capacity” storage drive (HDD) into a primary installation array to maintain the read/write of your Solid States without bending capacity confinements. In other words, your Solid State’s capacity is only limited to the size of your Hard Drive. How cool is that! Let’s get started…

[b]Items Required: [/b]
• Two Identical Solid State Drives With “RAID 0” Support
• Participating Solid States Must Be Of The Same Firmware (see manufacturer for details on updating)
• Windows 7 Professional Or Higher With Both x86(32-bit) & 64-Bit OS Discs
• High Capacity HDD(s) For Storage
• Patience
[b]
Preparing Proper SATA Connection:[/b]
• Connect SSD drives to SATA 0 and SATA 1 Ports (Normally Highest Speed)
• Connect Large Storage HDD(s) to SATA 2
• Optical Drive(s) Can Be Placed SATA 3+ Or Greater Than The Existing HDD SATA Connection

[b]NOTE:[/b] It is not required that the drives be blank, we will be clearing all the existing data regardless in upcoming procedures.

[b]Getting Started:[/b]
First things first, if you have an existing RAID array configured, you will need to break up the alignment to separate the drives. After the drives are segregated again, enter BIOS upon reboot. Once in BIOS load default settings. After loading defaults, mark CD-ROM as first boot and disable other boot devices. Also, set SATA mode to IDE. Stay in BIOS and place your Windows 7 32-bit in your disc device, don’t worry we will be using 64-bit for the OS. Once the disc is in and the BIOS has been configured accordingly reboot and prepare to get started by entering the 32-bit splash screen (DO NOT PROCEED BEYOND SPLASH).
Righthooks Guide To Lightning Fast SSD With Unlimited Storage




Welcome to another Righthooks tutorial. Throughout the course of this guide you will learn how to configure your Solid State Drives in TRUE 128k RAID 0 Stripe. In addition, you will learn how to manipulate a “high capacity” storage drive (HDD) into a primary installation array to maintain the read/write of your Solid States without bending capacity confinements. In other words, your Solid State’s capacity is only limited to the size of your Hard Drive. How cool is that! Let’s get started…



Items Required:

• Two Identical Solid State Drives With “RAID 0” Support

• Participating Solid States Must Be Of The Same Firmware (see manufacturer for details on updating)

• Windows 7 Professional Or Higher With Both x86(32-bit) & 64-Bit OS Discs

• High Capacity HDD(s) For Storage

• Patience



Preparing Proper SATA Connection:


• Connect SSD drives to SATA 0 and SATA 1 Ports (Normally Highest Speed)

• Connect Large Storage HDD(s) to SATA 2

• Optical Drive(s) Can Be Placed SATA 3+ Or Greater Than The Existing HDD SATA Connection



NOTE: It is not required that the drives be blank, we will be clearing all the existing data regardless in upcoming procedures.



Getting Started:

First things first, if you have an existing RAID array configured, you will need to break up the alignment to separate the drives. After the drives are segregated again, enter BIOS upon reboot. Once in BIOS load default settings. After loading defaults, mark CD-ROM as first boot and disable other boot devices. Also, set SATA mode to IDE. Stay in BIOS and place your Windows 7 32-bit in your disc device, don’t worry we will be using 64-bit for the OS. Once the disc is in and the BIOS has been configured accordingly reboot and prepare to get started by entering the 32-bit splash screen (DO NOT PROCEED BEYOND SPLASH).

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#1
Posted 10/19/2011 03:20 PM   
[size="4"]Step 1: Clearing Data From 32-Bit OS Command Prompt[/size]
Once you arrive at the Windows 7 32-bit splash screen, click next once to bring up the next screen of options. From this point you want to click on “Repair your computer.” On the following screen click the top-most option “use recovery tools…” Click Next. After arriving at the next series of options click the bottom-most option to enter “Command Prompt.”

From Command Prompt Follow These Specific Instructions From X : \ Sources>
• Type diskpart
This will bring up the disk partition screen allowing you to safely remove all data from the existing drives.
• At DISKPART> type list disk
This will display all of the drives present through your SATA connection beginning with SATA 0 (Disk 0)
IMPORTANT: For the next step we will be permanently erasing all data from the drives restoring them to factory default. The following steps will be repeated for all participating storage devices.
• Type select disk 0
This indicates to the partition service which drive is to be erased via Command Prompt
• Type clean
This is for the first pass erasing partition data from the selected drive
• When DISKPART> appears again type clean all
This restores factory space consumption and clears disk of error sectors

After the first drive is completed close Command Prompt, and reopen it to where you return to X: \ Sources>
Once you have arrived back at X : \ Sources> continue by repeating the steps starting with diskpart for all respected drives according to their SATA location. Remember you will need to close and reopen Command Prompt for each of the related drives beginning with Disk 0 up to your HDD which we will be cleaning but ignoring until much later.

Once all the drives have been securely erased we will proceed with rebuilding a RAID 0 array in a TRUE 128k limitless stripe. When the data cleaning is completed, restart and enter BIOS. From BIOS reconfigure your SATA mode to RAID. Save the changes made and reboot. During the reboot process press Ctrl + I to enter your drive configuration screen; once you have arrived at the drive configuration screen you can recreate a RAID 0 Volume. When doing this make sure you only select the two Solid State drives to become members of the array. Name the volume Win7OS: also, you want to assure you select RAID 0 Stripe and set the 128k rate.
[b]NOTE:[/b] This does not complete the array, so please do not proceed with any form of installation. We will get to that soon enough.

After you have securely erased the data and reconfigured your RAID 0 array, restart and reenter the Windows 7 splash screen, followed by Command Prompt as you did previously.

[size="4"]Step 2: Rebuilding The RAID 0 Array Properly From Command Prompt[/size]
Follow the given steps from Command Prompt X : \ Sources>
• Type diskpart
This will bring up the partition configuration option as before.
• From DISKPART> type list disk
Notice you will now have the RAID 0 volume as primary Disk 0
• When DISKPART> appears again type select disk 0
This next step is VERY important and will make the selected disk the PRIMARY array under 128k. You will first need to verify the partition is absent from the array (DOS requires this).
• With Disk 0 selected type list partition
You will be prompted that no partition exists. We are doing well, but this next step is extremely important.
• From DISKPART> you want to type the following command string:
create partition primary align=128
Now that the partition is successfully created, you will return to DISKPART>
• From here type list partition
You will see that the partition now exists successfully, but you are not done yet. Again from DISKPART> type the following
• active


This will have successfully locked-in 128k striping for your RAID 0 volume, as well as created the partition array for Windows 7 64-bit which we will be covering shortly. For now, you may type exit following DISKPART> to close the partition service. Reboot once this is done and enter BIOS. When in BIOS you can safely exchange the 32-bit OS we have been using to access command prompt for the 64-bit OS we will be installing to the newly built RAID 0 128k Array.
Step 1: Clearing Data From 32-Bit OS Command Prompt

Once you arrive at the Windows 7 32-bit splash screen, click next once to bring up the next screen of options. From this point you want to click on “Repair your computer.” On the following screen click the top-most option “use recovery tools…” Click Next. After arriving at the next series of options click the bottom-most option to enter “Command Prompt.”



From Command Prompt Follow These Specific Instructions From X : \ Sources>

• Type diskpart

This will bring up the disk partition screen allowing you to safely remove all data from the existing drives.

• At DISKPART> type list disk

This will display all of the drives present through your SATA connection beginning with SATA 0 (Disk 0)

IMPORTANT: For the next step we will be permanently erasing all data from the drives restoring them to factory default. The following steps will be repeated for all participating storage devices.

• Type select disk 0

This indicates to the partition service which drive is to be erased via Command Prompt

• Type clean

This is for the first pass erasing partition data from the selected drive

• When DISKPART> appears again type clean all

This restores factory space consumption and clears disk of error sectors



After the first drive is completed close Command Prompt, and reopen it to where you return to X: \ Sources>

Once you have arrived back at X : \ Sources> continue by repeating the steps starting with diskpart for all respected drives according to their SATA location. Remember you will need to close and reopen Command Prompt for each of the related drives beginning with Disk 0 up to your HDD which we will be cleaning but ignoring until much later.



Once all the drives have been securely erased we will proceed with rebuilding a RAID 0 array in a TRUE 128k limitless stripe. When the data cleaning is completed, restart and enter BIOS. From BIOS reconfigure your SATA mode to RAID. Save the changes made and reboot. During the reboot process press Ctrl + I to enter your drive configuration screen; once you have arrived at the drive configuration screen you can recreate a RAID 0 Volume. When doing this make sure you only select the two Solid State drives to become members of the array. Name the volume Win7OS: also, you want to assure you select RAID 0 Stripe and set the 128k rate.

NOTE: This does not complete the array, so please do not proceed with any form of installation. We will get to that soon enough.



After you have securely erased the data and reconfigured your RAID 0 array, restart and reenter the Windows 7 splash screen, followed by Command Prompt as you did previously.



Step 2: Rebuilding The RAID 0 Array Properly From Command Prompt

Follow the given steps from Command Prompt X : \ Sources>

• Type diskpart

This will bring up the partition configuration option as before.

• From DISKPART> type list disk

Notice you will now have the RAID 0 volume as primary Disk 0

• When DISKPART> appears again type select disk 0

This next step is VERY important and will make the selected disk the PRIMARY array under 128k. You will first need to verify the partition is absent from the array (DOS requires this).

• With Disk 0 selected type list partition

You will be prompted that no partition exists. We are doing well, but this next step is extremely important.

• From DISKPART> you want to type the following command string:

create partition primary align=128

Now that the partition is successfully created, you will return to DISKPART>

• From here type list partition

You will see that the partition now exists successfully, but you are not done yet. Again from DISKPART> type the following

• active





This will have successfully locked-in 128k striping for your RAID 0 volume, as well as created the partition array for Windows 7 64-bit which we will be covering shortly. For now, you may type exit following DISKPART> to close the partition service. Reboot once this is done and enter BIOS. When in BIOS you can safely exchange the 32-bit OS we have been using to access command prompt for the 64-bit OS we will be installing to the newly built RAID 0 128k Array.

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#2
Posted 10/19/2011 03:22 PM   
[size="4"]Step 3: Preparing & Configuring Windows 7 [/size]
At this point you are now ready to install the 64-bit operating system to your newly built RAID 0 128k Array. Follow the simple steps listed below and we will get started on the more complex configurations to create unlimited storage to the RAID 0 array via Windows 7 64-bit OS.

Once you arrive at the Windows 7 64-bit splash screen we can precede with the installation to the RAID 0 volume. From the main screen click next to arrive at the “Install Now” prompt.
• Click “Install Now”
• After you accept the agreement proceed to the next series of options
• Select Custom (advanced) IMPORTANT
• With Disk 0 Partition 1 Highlighted click Drive options (advanced)
• Next click on Format
[b]NOTE:[/b] Disregard the second volume (do not touch) we will be using it later via Windows 7 64-bit OS.
• Click next to begin Windows 7 64-bit installation to your RAID 0 volume
[b]IMPORTANT:[/b] When you first arrive in Windows DO NOT allow any installations to occur via Windows Update service. You may proceed with those following the configuration process.
[size="4"]
Step 4: Configuration of SSD Operations For “Lightning Fast” Storage [/size]
First, we will begin by configuring the drives for optimum read/write speeds

From “Device Manager” select Disk Drives to access the Solid State Drives, and right-click to open the “properties” tab.
• Click the “Policies” tab
• Select the second option to disable Windows write-cache service
• Exit “Device Manager”
Now we will remove the “Indexing” service from the primary Solid State Array.
• Access My Computer to where it displays your drive labeled C:
• Right-click and open the “Properties” tab
• Under General uncheck the bottom-most option and apply to disable “Indexing.”
• Click “Continue” followed by “Ignore All” when prompted (this will take a moment to apply changes)
When the changes are completed remain in the same panel for the next operation which is EXTRMEMLY important.
• Click on the “Tools” tab
• Click “Defragment Now” (you will not be using this just accessing the options)
• Click “Configure Schedule” when it appears
• Uncheck the first selection to run on a schedule (this disables defragmenting)
Once this is finished we will alter the boot parameters to assure full CPU usage assistance to the SSDs. To do this click the “Start” button and click within the search box. Type: msconfig and open the program.
• Click the second tab labeled “Boot”
• Click “Advanced Boot”
• Under number of processors select which applies to your maximum CPU count (threading included), and click “OK” This will apply full usage of the CPU during stage operation.
• Before you fully close the “Boot” tab; under your “Timeout” selection change the value to 3.
• Apply, exit, and Restart when prompted
Step 3: Preparing & Configuring Windows 7

At this point you are now ready to install the 64-bit operating system to your newly built RAID 0 128k Array. Follow the simple steps listed below and we will get started on the more complex configurations to create unlimited storage to the RAID 0 array via Windows 7 64-bit OS.



Once you arrive at the Windows 7 64-bit splash screen we can precede with the installation to the RAID 0 volume. From the main screen click next to arrive at the “Install Now” prompt.

• Click “Install Now”

• After you accept the agreement proceed to the next series of options

• Select Custom (advanced) IMPORTANT

• With Disk 0 Partition 1 Highlighted click Drive options (advanced)

• Next click on Format

NOTE: Disregard the second volume (do not touch) we will be using it later via Windows 7 64-bit OS.

• Click next to begin Windows 7 64-bit installation to your RAID 0 volume

IMPORTANT: When you first arrive in Windows DO NOT allow any installations to occur via Windows Update service. You may proceed with those following the configuration process.



Step 4: Configuration of SSD Operations For “Lightning Fast” Storage

First, we will begin by configuring the drives for optimum read/write speeds



From “Device Manager” select Disk Drives to access the Solid State Drives, and right-click to open the “properties” tab.

• Click the “Policies” tab

• Select the second option to disable Windows write-cache service

• Exit “Device Manager”

Now we will remove the “Indexing” service from the primary Solid State Array.

• Access My Computer to where it displays your drive labeled C:

• Right-click and open the “Properties” tab

• Under General uncheck the bottom-most option and apply to disable “Indexing.”

• Click “Continue” followed by “Ignore All” when prompted (this will take a moment to apply changes)

When the changes are completed remain in the same panel for the next operation which is EXTRMEMLY important.

• Click on the “Tools” tab

• Click “Defragment Now” (you will not be using this just accessing the options)

• Click “Configure Schedule” when it appears

• Uncheck the first selection to run on a schedule (this disables defragmenting)

Once this is finished we will alter the boot parameters to assure full CPU usage assistance to the SSDs. To do this click the “Start” button and click within the search box. Type: msconfig and open the program.

• Click the second tab labeled “Boot”

• Click “Advanced Boot”

• Under number of processors select which applies to your maximum CPU count (threading included), and click “OK” This will apply full usage of the CPU during stage operation.

• Before you fully close the “Boot” tab; under your “Timeout” selection change the value to 3.

• Apply, exit, and Restart when prompted

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#3
Posted 10/19/2011 03:24 PM   
[size="4"]Step 5: Unlimited Storage While Maintaining SSD Speeds[/size]
Now the moment you have been waiting for! Now that we have given the SSDs their proper care, let us proceed to give that HDD some love. The following steps will create a mirrored volume that will allow near unlimited (capacity respectful) storage to your Solid State RAID 0 128k Array. Let’s get started!
• First Access your Computer’s “Program Files (x86)” directory
• Create a new file called “PC Games”
• Close the window once the folder is created
• Click the “Start” button, and search under “disk” select the option labeled “Create and format hard disk partitions”
• Right-click on the HDD
• Select the top-most option “New Simple Volume”
• Click “Next”
• You will now have the option to assign the storage capacity variable to the drive (I use the full volume)
• Once you have the numerical capacity placed click “next” to bring up the new series of options
• Click the option labeled “Mount in the following empty NTFS folder”
• Browse to locate the folder you created labeled “PC Games” within the “Program Files (x86)” directory.
• Click “OK” to bring you to a new series of options
• With the second option selected labeled “Format the volume with the following settings” type “PC Games” in the “Volume label” box.
• Click “Next” twice to complete this operation
When this is completed you can now choose to select the installation path for ALL programs not just games to the indicated “PC Games” directory. This consumes ZERO space on the Solid States while maintaining the read/write speeds in which they operate at. Example: You wish to install “Battlefield 3.” You would simply direct the installation path to letter value and destination folder labeled “PC Games.” This will install to the HDD’s capacity, but still allow the full access speeds of your Solid State RAID 0 Array when accessing the game files. Pretty freaking cool huh?

[i]That concludes this tutorial, if you have any questions or comments please leave them accordingly. Good luck, and enjoy! This was post was a request of some fellow users after I mentioned it in a thread some time ago, and I agreed to write up the document, if you find that it is beneficial please request a sticky for future use. [/i]



-Hooks
Step 5: Unlimited Storage While Maintaining SSD Speeds

Now the moment you have been waiting for! Now that we have given the SSDs their proper care, let us proceed to give that HDD some love. The following steps will create a mirrored volume that will allow near unlimited (capacity respectful) storage to your Solid State RAID 0 128k Array. Let’s get started!

• First Access your Computer’s “Program Files (x86)” directory

• Create a new file called “PC Games”

• Close the window once the folder is created

• Click the “Start” button, and search under “disk” select the option labeled “Create and format hard disk partitions”

• Right-click on the HDD

• Select the top-most option “New Simple Volume”

• Click “Next”

• You will now have the option to assign the storage capacity variable to the drive (I use the full volume)

• Once you have the numerical capacity placed click “next” to bring up the new series of options

• Click the option labeled “Mount in the following empty NTFS folder”

• Browse to locate the folder you created labeled “PC Games” within the “Program Files (x86)” directory.

• Click “OK” to bring you to a new series of options

• With the second option selected labeled “Format the volume with the following settings” type “PC Games” in the “Volume label” box.

• Click “Next” twice to complete this operation

When this is completed you can now choose to select the installation path for ALL programs not just games to the indicated “PC Games” directory. This consumes ZERO space on the Solid States while maintaining the read/write speeds in which they operate at. Example: You wish to install “Battlefield 3.” You would simply direct the installation path to letter value and destination folder labeled “PC Games.” This will install to the HDD’s capacity, but still allow the full access speeds of your Solid State RAID 0 Array when accessing the game files. Pretty freaking cool huh?



That concludes this tutorial, if you have any questions or comments please leave them accordingly. Good luck, and enjoy! This was post was a request of some fellow users after I mentioned it in a thread some time ago, and I agreed to write up the document, if you find that it is beneficial please request a sticky for future use.







-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#4
Posted 10/19/2011 03:26 PM   
[i]I wanted to add a clarification Q & A to this thread. [/i]

Q: What Size SSD is required for this to work?

A: Provided it meets the capacity (which most do) of the Windows 7 Operating System virtually any SSD storage device will work provided it supports native RAID 0.

Q: Will this harm the operation of the Windows 7 operating system?

A: No, the Windows 7 operating system and its related registries remain unaffected.

Q: If you are using an HDD through the Solid States why does the read/write when accessing programs remain unaffected?

A: Installation of programs to the HDD will become accelerated as the SSD is essentially bridging the information to the device. Thereafter, all programs installed will be accessed at the full potential of the SSD read/write.

Q: What is the benefit to this lengthy configuration?

A: The largest compliant or downfall of the Solid State drive is cost vs. capacity. In short, this eliminates the necessity to pay in great expense for capacity of the Solid State Drives. By utilizing a mirror to a larger drive area, the space is literally only limited by the HDD capacity.

Q: Can I still use my Solid State array for storage if I do this?

A: Yes, this has no impact of the integrity of the Solid Sate array. You can use both if you desire.

Q: Is this safe?

A: Yes, I have been operating with this configuration for almost a year. Since which time no decline in either performance, or the appearance of disk errors have occurred.

[i]I wanted to go ahead and add these questions as some appeared on another forum in which the article was published. If there are further inquires please ask.[/i]

-Hooks
I wanted to add a clarification Q & A to this thread.



Q: What Size SSD is required for this to work?



A: Provided it meets the capacity (which most do) of the Windows 7 Operating System virtually any SSD storage device will work provided it supports native RAID 0.



Q: Will this harm the operation of the Windows 7 operating system?



A: No, the Windows 7 operating system and its related registries remain unaffected.



Q: If you are using an HDD through the Solid States why does the read/write when accessing programs remain unaffected?



A: Installation of programs to the HDD will become accelerated as the SSD is essentially bridging the information to the device. Thereafter, all programs installed will be accessed at the full potential of the SSD read/write.



Q: What is the benefit to this lengthy configuration?



A: The largest compliant or downfall of the Solid State drive is cost vs. capacity. In short, this eliminates the necessity to pay in great expense for capacity of the Solid State Drives. By utilizing a mirror to a larger drive area, the space is literally only limited by the HDD capacity.



Q: Can I still use my Solid State array for storage if I do this?



A: Yes, this has no impact of the integrity of the Solid Sate array. You can use both if you desire.



Q: Is this safe?



A: Yes, I have been operating with this configuration for almost a year. Since which time no decline in either performance, or the appearance of disk errors have occurred.



I wanted to go ahead and add these questions as some appeared on another forum in which the article was published. If there are further inquires please ask.



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#5
Posted 10/19/2011 08:09 PM   
[quote name='Righthooks' date='19 October 2011 - 03:26 PM' timestamp='1319037998' post='1310407']
[size="4"]Step 5: Unlimited Storage While Maintaining SSD Speeds[/size]
Now the moment you have been waiting for! Now that we have given the SSDs their proper care, let us proceed to give that HDD some love. The following steps will create a mirrored volume that will allow near unlimited (capacity respectful) storage to your Solid State RAID 0 128k Array. Let’s get started!
• First Access your Computer’s “Program Files (x86)” directory
• Create a new file called “PC Games”
• Close the window once the folder is created
• Click the “Start” button, and search under “disk” select the option labeled “Create and format hard disk partitions”
• Right-click on the HDD
• Select the top-most option “New Simple Volume”
• Click “Next”
• You will now have the option to assign the storage capacity variable to the drive (I use the full volume)
• Once you have the numerical capacity placed click “next” to bring up the new series of options
• Click the option labeled “Mount in the following empty NTFS folder”
• Browse to locate the folder you created labeled “PC Games” within the “Program Files (x86)” directory.
• Click “OK” to bring you to a new series of options
• With the second option selected labeled “Format the volume with the following settings” type “PC Games” in the “Volume label” box.
• Click “Next” twice to complete this operation
When this is completed you can now choose to select the installation path for ALL programs not just games to the indicated “PC Games” directory. This consumes ZERO space on the Solid States while maintaining the read/write speeds in which they operate at. Example: You wish to install “Battlefield 3.” You would simply direct the installation path to letter value and destination folder labeled “PC Games.” This will install to the HDD’s capacity, but still allow the full access speeds of your Solid State RAID 0 Array when accessing the game files. Pretty freaking cool huh?

[i]That concludes this tutorial, if you have any questions or comments please leave them accordingly. Good luck, and enjoy! This was post was a request of some fellow users after I mentioned it in a thread some time ago, and I agreed to write up the document, if you find that it is beneficial please request a sticky for future use. [/i]



-Hooks
[/quote]
Do you have any actual benchmarks after using the mentioned configuration? If not, can you explain how such a configuration would actually result in SSD access times?
If you mount a NTFS junction on C:\ to a regular HDD, that would simply function as a pointer.
How would this generate SSD access times when the following problems would still occur?
[list]
[*]The disk still needs to spin-up
[*]The HDD still needs to seek the data
[*]Seeking will also cause rotational latency
[/list]

Am I missing something?
[quote name='Righthooks' date='19 October 2011 - 03:26 PM' timestamp='1319037998' post='1310407']

Step 5: Unlimited Storage While Maintaining SSD Speeds

Now the moment you have been waiting for! Now that we have given the SSDs their proper care, let us proceed to give that HDD some love. The following steps will create a mirrored volume that will allow near unlimited (capacity respectful) storage to your Solid State RAID 0 128k Array. Let’s get started!

• First Access your Computer’s “Program Files (x86)” directory

• Create a new file called “PC Games”

• Close the window once the folder is created

• Click the “Start” button, and search under “disk” select the option labeled “Create and format hard disk partitions”

• Right-click on the HDD

• Select the top-most option “New Simple Volume”

• Click “Next”

• You will now have the option to assign the storage capacity variable to the drive (I use the full volume)

• Once you have the numerical capacity placed click “next” to bring up the new series of options

• Click the option labeled “Mount in the following empty NTFS folder”

• Browse to locate the folder you created labeled “PC Games” within the “Program Files (x86)” directory.

• Click “OK” to bring you to a new series of options

• With the second option selected labeled “Format the volume with the following settings” type “PC Games” in the “Volume label” box.

• Click “Next” twice to complete this operation

When this is completed you can now choose to select the installation path for ALL programs not just games to the indicated “PC Games” directory. This consumes ZERO space on the Solid States while maintaining the read/write speeds in which they operate at. Example: You wish to install “Battlefield 3.” You would simply direct the installation path to letter value and destination folder labeled “PC Games.” This will install to the HDD’s capacity, but still allow the full access speeds of your Solid State RAID 0 Array when accessing the game files. Pretty freaking cool huh?



That concludes this tutorial, if you have any questions or comments please leave them accordingly. Good luck, and enjoy! This was post was a request of some fellow users after I mentioned it in a thread some time ago, and I agreed to write up the document, if you find that it is beneficial please request a sticky for future use.







-Hooks



Do you have any actual benchmarks after using the mentioned configuration? If not, can you explain how such a configuration would actually result in SSD access times?

If you mount a NTFS junction on C:\ to a regular HDD, that would simply function as a pointer.

How would this generate SSD access times when the following problems would still occur?


  • The disk still needs to spin-up
  • The HDD still needs to seek the data
  • Seeking will also cause rotational latency




Am I missing something?

#6
Posted 11/29/2011 10:11 PM   
Hi, I had to post because this not possible, and the fact it's on this forum is extremely concerning.

The speed of an HDD is a physical imitation, you can't bridge the gap to increase performance.

You are making a mount point called c:/Program Files/Games where Program files might be on the SSD but game is on the HDD. It is nothing more than a shortcut to the HDD's Letter icon.

I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed. period.

If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.
Hi, I had to post because this not possible, and the fact it's on this forum is extremely concerning.



The speed of an HDD is a physical imitation, you can't bridge the gap to increase performance.



You are making a mount point called c:/Program Files/Games where Program files might be on the SSD but game is on the HDD. It is nothing more than a shortcut to the HDD's Letter icon.



I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed. period.



If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.

#7
Posted 12/01/2011 01:44 AM   
jarch87 makes good points.
jarch87 makes good points.

#8
Posted 12/01/2011 06:51 AM   
[quote name='jarch87' date='30 November 2011 - 08:44 PM' timestamp='1322703866' post='1335603']...I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. [i][b]So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed[/b][/i]. period.

If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.[/quote]
Hooks' process seems a variation on the new technique of SSD caching in support of a hard drive as is being found on some of the new MOBOs, and the highlighted portion of your quoted posting seems to be the underpinning.

If the two lag points of loading and texture streaming within a game are considered in relation to the need for additional storage, then this method brings with it the ability to isolate operations to just those two points and the additional load of game saves. If the HDD is cached, either through its IDE controller or through OS write-caching, then you've trimmed things down to just the two biggest read operations. And that can be planned for by choosing HDDs with decent numbers to lessen the impact further.

Until Hooks posted this tutorial, I was one of those using a seperate disk volume as simply "D:" drive. I've been trying out Hooks' method for a couple of weeks now, but with a twist - the attached HDD volume on my system is the VelociRaptor RAID0 array I had been using as the "D:" drive. And I have to admit, there's enough of a difference in the "feel" of the system to support a focused look at comparative benchmarks. Perhaps the best example of this is the Benchmark Tool for Far Cry 2: I've owned this game since its release, and this is the first time I can run the BM at full settings with [i]absolutely no stutter at all[/i].

I run a single-Xeon X3460 WS with three GTX 470s, and this arrangement's response is now so fluid that I myself am tempted to benchmark the differences "for the record". It's a lot of work for which I do not have the time for presently, however - complete OS and application suite reinstalls do take a lot more time than simply benchmarking particular apps - so for the time being I can only supply anecdotal evidence. But even at that I'd say it's definitely worth documenting the differences in approach...
[quote name='jarch87' date='30 November 2011 - 08:44 PM' timestamp='1322703866' post='1335603']...I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed. period.



If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.

Hooks' process seems a variation on the new technique of SSD caching in support of a hard drive as is being found on some of the new MOBOs, and the highlighted portion of your quoted posting seems to be the underpinning.



If the two lag points of loading and texture streaming within a game are considered in relation to the need for additional storage, then this method brings with it the ability to isolate operations to just those two points and the additional load of game saves. If the HDD is cached, either through its IDE controller or through OS write-caching, then you've trimmed things down to just the two biggest read operations. And that can be planned for by choosing HDDs with decent numbers to lessen the impact further.



Until Hooks posted this tutorial, I was one of those using a seperate disk volume as simply "D:" drive. I've been trying out Hooks' method for a couple of weeks now, but with a twist - the attached HDD volume on my system is the VelociRaptor RAID0 array I had been using as the "D:" drive. And I have to admit, there's enough of a difference in the "feel" of the system to support a focused look at comparative benchmarks. Perhaps the best example of this is the Benchmark Tool for Far Cry 2: I've owned this game since its release, and this is the first time I can run the BM at full settings with absolutely no stutter at all.



I run a single-Xeon X3460 WS with three GTX 470s, and this arrangement's response is now so fluid that I myself am tempted to benchmark the differences "for the record". It's a lot of work for which I do not have the time for presently, however - complete OS and application suite reinstalls do take a lot more time than simply benchmarking particular apps - so for the time being I can only supply anecdotal evidence. But even at that I'd say it's definitely worth documenting the differences in approach...

Intel Siler DX79SI Desktop Extreme | Intel Core i7-3820 Sandy Bridge-Extreme | DangerDen M6 and Koolance MVR-40s w/Black Ice Stealths | 32 GB Mushkin PC3-12800LV | NVIDIA GTX 660 Ti SLI | PNY GTX 470 | 24 GB RAMDisk (C:\Temp\Temp) | 120 GB Intel Cherryville SSDs (OS and UserData)| 530 GB Western Digital VelociRaptor SATA 2 RAID0 (C:\Games\) | 60 GB G2 SSDs (XP Pro and Linux) | 3 TB Western Digital USB-3 MyBook (Archive) | LG BP40NS20 USB ODD | LG IPS236 Monitor | LogiTech X-530 Speakers | Plantronics GameCom 780 Headphones | Cooler Master UCP 1100 | Cooler Master HAF XB | Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1

Stock is Extreme now

#9
Posted 12/01/2011 09:14 AM   
[quote name='RedXIII' date='29 November 2011 - 05:11 PM' timestamp='1322604686' post='1334938']
Do you have any actual benchmarks after using the mentioned configuration? If not, can you explain how such a configuration would actually result in SSD access times?
If you mount a NTFS junction on C:\ to a regular HDD, that would simply function as a pointer.
How would this generate SSD access times when the following problems would still occur?
[list]
[*]The disk still needs to spin-up
[*]The HDD still needs to seek the data
[*]Seeking will also cause rotational latency
[/list]

Am I missing something?
[/quote]


[quote name='jarch87' date='30 November 2011 - 08:44 PM' timestamp='1322703866' post='1335603']
Hi, I had to post because this not possible, and the fact it's on this forum is extremely concerning.

The speed of an HDD is a physical imitation, you can't bridge the gap to increase performance.

You are making a mount point called c:/Program Files/Games where Program files might be on the SSD but game is on the HDD. It is nothing more than a shortcut to the HDD's Letter icon.

I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed. period.

If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.
[/quote]

[i]When breaking down the performance operation between accessing files via a traditional NFTS storage device (HDD) externally created, versus that of one mounted within a RAID 0 array via Solid States two elements are key.

First, the HDD is identified as a sub directory within the Solid State array provided content is present on the HDD (created NTFS file folder), normally following group installation. This means that when dynamically accessing the data whether directly from the desktop or through games themselves, the folder is treated as present in the Solid State array, not the actual HDD. This negates the spin cycles temporarily, as the information is accessed in the same manor as say the x86 origin files for the OS which are directly placed on the partition.

Second, operation limitations that normally are present through the HDD are removed at the applications launch. Detection of packets within the array are "skimmed" if you will, rather than directly approached. This is due to the primary drive folder being initiated through the Solid State's instruction.

In theory you would be correct, the hard drive would be active and limited by its manufacturing and moving parts, however accessing the file folders present through the "mounted" storage device is altered at the basic level by the Solid State's read/write. Understand, you are not altering the HDD's performance, you are simply bypassing it's operation by negating the activity through the primary array when accessing files & folders.

The ideology is to limit occupancy present on the Solid State Drives by utilizing a massive file folder(NTFS), yet allowing dynamic access via games to maintain Solid State seek times.

There is additional clarification and benchmark assessments via HD Tune 4.60 found [url="http://www.trubritarforums.com/index.php/topic/8135-ssd-unlimited-storage-tutorial/page__p__85558#entry85558"]on this thread.[/url] [/i]

-Hooks
[quote name='RedXIII' date='29 November 2011 - 05:11 PM' timestamp='1322604686' post='1334938']

Do you have any actual benchmarks after using the mentioned configuration? If not, can you explain how such a configuration would actually result in SSD access times?

If you mount a NTFS junction on C:\ to a regular HDD, that would simply function as a pointer.

How would this generate SSD access times when the following problems would still occur?


  • The disk still needs to spin-up
  • The HDD still needs to seek the data
  • Seeking will also cause rotational latency




Am I missing something?







[quote name='jarch87' date='30 November 2011 - 08:44 PM' timestamp='1322703866' post='1335603']

Hi, I had to post because this not possible, and the fact it's on this forum is extremely concerning.



The speed of an HDD is a physical imitation, you can't bridge the gap to increase performance.



You are making a mount point called c:/Program Files/Games where Program files might be on the SSD but game is on the HDD. It is nothing more than a shortcut to the HDD's Letter icon.



I wouldn't be suprised if it is a bit faster, or feels faster. The OS is on the SSD, and the game is running on the OS. So any data that is cached, or kept within the OS(temp files etc), will be at the SSD speed. However, any data at all that is accesssed from the HDD will be at the HDD's speed. period.



If you feel this strongly that it's accurate, please post benchmarks proving it. Writing/reading from that directory will be limited to the speed of the HDD.





When breaking down the performance operation between accessing files via a traditional NFTS storage device (HDD) externally created, versus that of one mounted within a RAID 0 array via Solid States two elements are key.



First, the HDD is identified as a sub directory within the Solid State array provided content is present on the HDD (created NTFS file folder), normally following group installation. This means that when dynamically accessing the data whether directly from the desktop or through games themselves, the folder is treated as present in the Solid State array, not the actual HDD. This negates the spin cycles temporarily, as the information is accessed in the same manor as say the x86 origin files for the OS which are directly placed on the partition.



Second, operation limitations that normally are present through the HDD are removed at the applications launch. Detection of packets within the array are "skimmed" if you will, rather than directly approached. This is due to the primary drive folder being initiated through the Solid State's instruction.



In theory you would be correct, the hard drive would be active and limited by its manufacturing and moving parts, however accessing the file folders present through the "mounted" storage device is altered at the basic level by the Solid State's read/write. Understand, you are not altering the HDD's performance, you are simply bypassing it's operation by negating the activity through the primary array when accessing files & folders.



The ideology is to limit occupancy present on the Solid State Drives by utilizing a massive file folder(NTFS), yet allowing dynamic access via games to maintain Solid State seek times.



There is additional clarification and benchmark assessments via HD Tune 4.60 found on this thread.




-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#10
Posted 12/01/2011 01:52 PM   
Hmmm, can you explain what your HD Tune benchmark reveals? It seems to me that it just reports the read/access time of your SSD RAID. How does that involve the mounting of the HDD?

In the other thread you mentioned that this also holds true when just using a single SSD, which is what I have, rather than a SSD RAID.

[b]Test[/b]
As I am unsure about the relevance of using HD Tune as a benchmark, I tried using TeraCopy's Test feature, which reports the read speed of selected files/folders.
I am testing a 154mb folder called "lib".
That folder is accessible in 3 locations
[list]
[*]C:\lib (SSD)
[*]F:\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (Direct HDD access)
[*]C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (HDD mounted on SSD)
[/list]
As seen below, the read speed when mounting the HDD on the SSD didn't change much. Comments?
[img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/16194500/Comparison3.jpg[/img]
Hmmm, can you explain what your HD Tune benchmark reveals? It seems to me that it just reports the read/access time of your SSD RAID. How does that involve the mounting of the HDD?



In the other thread you mentioned that this also holds true when just using a single SSD, which is what I have, rather than a SSD RAID.



Test

As I am unsure about the relevance of using HD Tune as a benchmark, I tried using TeraCopy's Test feature, which reports the read speed of selected files/folders.

I am testing a 154mb folder called "lib".

That folder is accessible in 3 locations


  • C:\lib (SSD)
  • F:\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (Direct HDD access)
  • C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (HDD mounted on SSD)


As seen below, the read speed when mounting the HDD on the SSD didn't change much. Comments?

Image

#11
Posted 12/01/2011 11:56 PM   
He said that the IO speeds fluctuate on a single SSD. I believe you could attribute it to that.

But I'll wait for hooks to clarify.
He said that the IO speeds fluctuate on a single SSD. I believe you could attribute it to that.



But I'll wait for hooks to clarify.

Core i7 960 @4.14Ghz 180x23 1.3v Liquid cooled

Gigabyte G1. Assassin

EVGA GTX 560 Ti "Maximum Graphics Crysis 2"

Cooler Master HAF-X

Corsair Dominator GT CMT12GX3M3A2000C9 RAM

RMA broke my 580 SLI. Now I have a 7970 and a GTX 580 gathering dust, looking for a buyer.

#12
Posted 12/02/2011 12:01 PM   
[quote name='Righthooks' date='01 December 2011 - 08:52 AM' timestamp='1322747553' post='1335801']
[i]When breaking down the performance operation between accessing files via a traditional NFTS storage device (HDD) externally created, versus that of one mounted within a RAID 0 array via Solid States two elements are key.

First, the HDD is identified as a sub directory within the Solid State array provided content is present on the HDD (created NTFS file folder), normally following group installation. This means that when dynamically accessing the data whether directly from the desktop or through games themselves, the folder is treated as present in the Solid State array, not the actual HDD. This negates the spin cycles temporarily, as the information is accessed in the same manor as say the x86 origin files for the OS which are directly placed on the partition.

Second, operation limitations that normally are present through the HDD are removed at the applications launch. Detection of packets within the array are "skimmed" if you will, rather than directly approached. This is due to the primary drive folder being initiated through the Solid State's instruction.

In theory you would be correct, the hard drive would be active and limited by its manufacturing and moving parts, however accessing the file folders present through the "mounted" storage device is altered at the basic level by the Solid State's read/write. Understand, you are not altering the HDD's performance, you are simply bypassing it's operation by negating the activity through the primary array when accessing files & folders.

The ideology is to limit occupancy present on the Solid State Drives by utilizing a massive file folder(NTFS), yet allowing dynamic access via games to maintain Solid State seek times.
[/i]
-Hooks
[/quote]


[quote name='RedXIII' date='01 December 2011 - 06:56 PM' timestamp='1322783772' post='1336109']
Hmmm, can you explain what your HD Tune benchmark reveals? It seems to me that it just reports the read/access time of your SSD RAID. How does that involve the mounting of the HDD?

In the other thread you mentioned that this also holds true when just using a single SSD, which is what I have, rather than a SSD RAID.

[b]Test[/b]
As I am unsure about the relevance of using HD Tune as a benchmark, I tried using TeraCopy's Test feature, which reports the read speed of selected files/folders.
I am testing a 154mb folder called "lib".
That folder is accessible in 3 locations
[list]
[*]C:\lib (SSD)
[*]F:\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (Direct HDD access)
[*]C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (HDD mounted on SSD)
[/list]
As seen below, the read speed when mounting the HDD on the SSD didn't change much. Comments?
[img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/16194500/Comparison3.jpg[/img]
[/quote]


[i]You performed these tests with the SSD containing the operating system and the HDD mounted as a clean formatted partition correct? Also, as specified in the tutorial, it is crucial that the HDD NTFS is to be mounted as instructed. It also looks like you simply placed the HDD into the SSD and relocated the program files prior to access. This is essentially the same as dragging the file system.
[b]
EDIT:[/b] I also relinked my original response, as I thought it clarified the HDDs operating role. Correct me if I'm wrong, but are you under the impression that the Solid State is going to change how the HDD operates independently?
[/i]

[b]EDIT 2:[/b] [i]I neglected to clarify your question regarding my HDTune Benchmark in my response to you. It was a followup to an inquiry made about additional seek cycles added to the drives that would result in "slowing" of the Solid State Drive's operation. I wanted to display that no decreases were made by utilizing the additional capacity of the HDD.[/i]

-Hooks
[quote name='Righthooks' date='01 December 2011 - 08:52 AM' timestamp='1322747553' post='1335801']

When breaking down the performance operation between accessing files via a traditional NFTS storage device (HDD) externally created, versus that of one mounted within a RAID 0 array via Solid States two elements are key.



First, the HDD is identified as a sub directory within the Solid State array provided content is present on the HDD (created NTFS file folder), normally following group installation. This means that when dynamically accessing the data whether directly from the desktop or through games themselves, the folder is treated as present in the Solid State array, not the actual HDD. This negates the spin cycles temporarily, as the information is accessed in the same manor as say the x86 origin files for the OS which are directly placed on the partition.



Second, operation limitations that normally are present through the HDD are removed at the applications launch. Detection of packets within the array are "skimmed" if you will, rather than directly approached. This is due to the primary drive folder being initiated through the Solid State's instruction.



In theory you would be correct, the hard drive would be active and limited by its manufacturing and moving parts, however accessing the file folders present through the "mounted" storage device is altered at the basic level by the Solid State's read/write. Understand, you are not altering the HDD's performance, you are simply bypassing it's operation by negating the activity through the primary array when accessing files & folders.



The ideology is to limit occupancy present on the Solid State Drives by utilizing a massive file folder(NTFS), yet allowing dynamic access via games to maintain Solid State seek times.



-Hooks







[quote name='RedXIII' date='01 December 2011 - 06:56 PM' timestamp='1322783772' post='1336109']

Hmmm, can you explain what your HD Tune benchmark reveals? It seems to me that it just reports the read/access time of your SSD RAID. How does that involve the mounting of the HDD?



In the other thread you mentioned that this also holds true when just using a single SSD, which is what I have, rather than a SSD RAID.



Test

As I am unsure about the relevance of using HD Tune as a benchmark, I tried using TeraCopy's Test feature, which reports the read speed of selected files/folders.

I am testing a 154mb folder called "lib".

That folder is accessible in 3 locations


  • C:\lib (SSD)
  • F:\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (Direct HDD access)
  • C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib (HDD mounted on SSD)


As seen below, the read speed when mounting the HDD on the SSD didn't change much. Comments?

Image







You performed these tests with the SSD containing the operating system and the HDD mounted as a clean formatted partition correct? Also, as specified in the tutorial, it is crucial that the HDD NTFS is to be mounted as instructed. It also looks like you simply placed the HDD into the SSD and relocated the program files prior to access. This is essentially the same as dragging the file system.



EDIT:
I also relinked my original response, as I thought it clarified the HDDs operating role. Correct me if I'm wrong, but are you under the impression that the Solid State is going to change how the HDD operates independently?





EDIT 2: I neglected to clarify your question regarding my HDTune Benchmark in my response to you. It was a followup to an inquiry made about additional seek cycles added to the drives that would result in "slowing" of the Solid State Drive's operation. I wanted to display that no decreases were made by utilizing the additional capacity of the HDD.



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#13
Posted 12/02/2011 01:14 PM   
[quote name='Ultimate PC Man' date='02 December 2011 - 12:01 PM' timestamp='1322827291' post='1336385']
He said that the IO speeds fluctuate on a single SSD. I believe you could attribute it to that.

But I'll wait for hooks to clarify.
[/quote]
I ran the test multiple times. The results on the SSD ( C:\lib ) definitely fluctuated a fair amount (70-160 MB/s), but the other two tests were always within +-5 of my screenshot.

[quote name='Righthooks' date='02 December 2011 - 01:14 PM' timestamp='1322831657' post='1336411']
[i]You performed these tests with the SSD containing the operating system and the HDD mounted as a clean formatted partition correct? Also, as specified in the tutorial, it is crucial that the HDD NTFS is to be mounted as instructed. It also looks like you simply placed the HDD into the SSD and relocated the program files prior to access. This is essentially the same as dragging the file system.
[b]
EDIT:[/b] I also relinked my original response, as I thought it clarified the HDDs operating role. Correct me if I'm wrong, but are you under the impression that the Solid State is going to change how the HDD operates independently?
[/i]

[b]EDIT 2:[/b] [i]I neglected to clarify your question regarding my HDTune Benchmark in my response to you. It was a followup to an inquiry made about additional seek cycles added to the drives that would result in "slowing" of the Solid State Drive's operation. I wanted to display that no decreases were made by utilizing the additional capacity of the HDD.[/i]

-Hooks
[/quote]

Let me add a bit more information. I actually have been running my system for awhile with a mounted HDD on it. However, that was for the convenience of having all software installed "on" C:\ rather than an expected speed increase as I didn't think it would be possible.

[list]
[*]I installed Windows 7 x64 on my SSD (C:\)
[*]I formatted a new 1TB HDD and mounted it in a new empty folder ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software ) via Disk Management
[*]I install all of my applications in ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software\Apps )
[*]I install all of my games in ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software\Games )
[*]Then for the test, I tested the access time via the mount point, then I replaced the mount point with drive letter F: and repeated the test
[/list]

My understanding is that you are claiming that by mounting a HDD on a SDD, the hardware limitations of the HDD will essentially be bypassed when accessed via the mounting point because the mount point is viewed as a folder on the SSD, rather than an independent HDD. The SSD could be compared to a hash table I suppose.

So in my above test, when accessing the folder "C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib", shouldn't I expect to see an access time similar to the SSD, rather than the HDD? While accessing the drive directly via F:\ should remain with the slow access time.
[quote name='Ultimate PC Man' date='02 December 2011 - 12:01 PM' timestamp='1322827291' post='1336385']

He said that the IO speeds fluctuate on a single SSD. I believe you could attribute it to that.



But I'll wait for hooks to clarify.



I ran the test multiple times. The results on the SSD ( C:\lib ) definitely fluctuated a fair amount (70-160 MB/s), but the other two tests were always within +-5 of my screenshot.



[quote name='Righthooks' date='02 December 2011 - 01:14 PM' timestamp='1322831657' post='1336411']

You performed these tests with the SSD containing the operating system and the HDD mounted as a clean formatted partition correct? Also, as specified in the tutorial, it is crucial that the HDD NTFS is to be mounted as instructed. It also looks like you simply placed the HDD into the SSD and relocated the program files prior to access. This is essentially the same as dragging the file system.



EDIT:
I also relinked my original response, as I thought it clarified the HDDs operating role. Correct me if I'm wrong, but are you under the impression that the Solid State is going to change how the HDD operates independently?





EDIT 2: I neglected to clarify your question regarding my HDTune Benchmark in my response to you. It was a followup to an inquiry made about additional seek cycles added to the drives that would result in "slowing" of the Solid State Drive's operation. I wanted to display that no decreases were made by utilizing the additional capacity of the HDD.



-Hooks





Let me add a bit more information. I actually have been running my system for awhile with a mounted HDD on it. However, that was for the convenience of having all software installed "on" C:\ rather than an expected speed increase as I didn't think it would be possible.




  • I installed Windows 7 x64 on my SSD (C:\)
  • I formatted a new 1TB HDD and mounted it in a new empty folder ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software ) via Disk Management
  • I install all of my applications in ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software\Apps )
  • I install all of my games in ( C:\Program Files(x86)\Software\Games )
  • Then for the test, I tested the access time via the mount point, then I replaced the mount point with drive letter F: and repeated the test




My understanding is that you are claiming that by mounting a HDD on a SDD, the hardware limitations of the HDD will essentially be bypassed when accessed via the mounting point because the mount point is viewed as a folder on the SSD, rather than an independent HDD. The SSD could be compared to a hash table I suppose.



So in my above test, when accessing the folder "C:\Program Files (x86)\Software\Apps\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\lib", shouldn't I expect to see an access time similar to the SSD, rather than the HDD? While accessing the drive directly via F:\ should remain with the slow access time.

#14
Posted 12/02/2011 05:05 PM   
nice guide :D
nice guide :D

#15
Posted 02/09/2012 02:23 PM   
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