Basic Guide To Top Tier Blocks Top Tier CPU Water-Blocks
[size="5"]The Simple Guide to Purchasing the Best Water-Block for Your Build In 2011[/size]

[img]http://i1038.photobucket.com/albums/a465/RighthooksGURU/TopTier.jpg[/img]
[size="1"]Please disregard items in the background, I am moving unused to storage. /rolleyes.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':rolleyes:' />[/size]

[i]There is still some time left in the year, so those last minute builders may want to take a look at some encouraging words from one of constantly building.

So, over the past couple days I have been rebuilding my main rig, and decided to shed some insight and clarification on what I feel are the best blocks around for this past 2011 year. I have quite a lot of experience in watercooling builds, specifically enthusiast-class rigs that don’t come with budgets. I have been through six total water-blocks this year, including last week’s short lived “EN” renovation from EK to the stellar, and much loved by me “EK Supreme HF.” Of those six I picked half, as I feel deducing odds on a smaller testing ground is always the best method. Not to mention the three in the race, are among the most popular.


I will give my statements relating to the order that I first used the blocks, and why I gave them.[/i]
[b]
“Heatkiller Rev. 3.0 Full Copper” (Self-Lapped 800-2000 Automotive grit)[/b]

[i]Without question the oldest of the bunch, and built with strength that you can feel. When the “Heatkiller Rev 3.0” was first introduced, it was not only questionably the “ugliest” of the blocks, but was also the top performing under every circumstance. When I decided to push things a little further(as I usually do) I wanted to make the surface as flat and immaculate as possible. Stock, the block was nearly flawless with the exception of the corners which didn’t make flush chip contact. This coupled with the cumbersome and quite difficult mounting were the only low-points of its production and its life within my system.[/i]
[b]
EK Supreme HF “Nickel” (Stock, and 5 Slot Jet-Plates) [/b]

[i]Big clocks require big performance, and to this day the EK Supreme HF “Nickel” performs and looks the part of the best water-block on the market. Achieving just 23C on idle (core4) on my 980X @ 4.5GHz remains the most just dropping point of this water-block’s lifespan. Controversy followed that the block was damaging to the systems it was installed on, this was mainly due to the manufacturing process the nickel plating underwent. EK covered their tracks with an “EN” model of the popular and highly acclaimed water-block, of which is clearly an inferior model. As a matter of fact, I challenged the theories of destruction behind the original “EK Supreme HF.” Mostly due to the disappointing drops in performance following the installation of the newly developed “EN” model. Here is what I found after almost a year of use…[/i]
[b]
EK Supreme HF “Nickel” 309 Days occupying my primary loop (cleaned with AC Step 1+2 and 3.5% Lemon Juice with Premium Distilled Water).[/b]

Flawless Internals
Flawless Externals
Flawless Contact Point
[img]http://i1038.photobucket.com/albums/a465/RighthooksGURU/EKCleansing.jpg[/img]

[i]Conclusion, I still approve of the “EK Supreme HF” as one of the best looking and best performing blocks I have ever used (I can’t say the same for the new “EN” model).[/i]

[b]Koolance 370 CPU "Stock"[/b]
[i]
This will be the shortest segment of the comparison, and quite honestly I saved the best for last. Getting this out of the way first, I have had tremendous disappointment with Koolance water-blocks for both the GF100 (GTX480), and GF110 (GTX580) GPU-Blocks. Only, to have a much respected and admired gentlemen of which I learned almost everything about water-cooling from tell me, “there is no other block on the market as far as I’m concerned.” So, me always aiming for the clouds, decided to pick one up. Simply put, he was right…everything about the unit rocks, from build quality, installation, and performance. Koolance has indeed won this round and cleared their name with me, and in with my seal of approval, produced the best CPU water-block of 2011.

I hope you enjoyed my basic overview of 2011’s coolest water-blocks, speaking from experience...the Koolance 370 is the gamer’s choice.

Additionally, upon the request of some users on these forums I have almost completed my very in-depth coverage of using RAID 0 configured Solid State drives in conjunction with large capacity HDDs such as the Caviar Black to produce unlimited storage while maintaining the read/write of the SSDs base operation. Throughout that guide I will cover: preparation, maintenance, operating system level configuration, and BIOS, SATA striping in correct format for 128K speed.[/i]


[b]EDIT:[/b] [i]To further emphasize the scope of how incredible this block is...take a look at the boot/idles below. [/i]
[img]http://i1038.photobucket.com/albums/a465/RighthooksGURU/EXTREME.png[/img]



-Hooks
The Simple Guide to Purchasing the Best Water-Block for Your Build In 2011



Image

Please disregard items in the background, I am moving unused to storage. /rolleyes.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':rolleyes:' />



There is still some time left in the year, so those last minute builders may want to take a look at some encouraging words from one of constantly building.



So, over the past couple days I have been rebuilding my main rig, and decided to shed some insight and clarification on what I feel are the best blocks around for this past 2011 year. I have quite a lot of experience in watercooling builds, specifically enthusiast-class rigs that don’t come with budgets. I have been through six total water-blocks this year, including last week’s short lived “EN” renovation from EK to the stellar, and much loved by me “EK Supreme HF.” Of those six I picked half, as I feel deducing odds on a smaller testing ground is always the best method. Not to mention the three in the race, are among the most popular.





I will give my statements relating to the order that I first used the blocks, and why I gave them.




“Heatkiller Rev. 3.0 Full Copper” (Self-Lapped 800-2000 Automotive grit)




Without question the oldest of the bunch, and built with strength that you can feel. When the “Heatkiller Rev 3.0” was first introduced, it was not only questionably the “ugliest” of the blocks, but was also the top performing under every circumstance. When I decided to push things a little further(as I usually do) I wanted to make the surface as flat and immaculate as possible. Stock, the block was nearly flawless with the exception of the corners which didn’t make flush chip contact. This coupled with the cumbersome and quite difficult mounting were the only low-points of its production and its life within my system.



EK Supreme HF “Nickel” (Stock, and 5 Slot Jet-Plates)




Big clocks require big performance, and to this day the EK Supreme HF “Nickel” performs and looks the part of the best water-block on the market. Achieving just 23C on idle (core4) on my 980X @ 4.5GHz remains the most just dropping point of this water-block’s lifespan. Controversy followed that the block was damaging to the systems it was installed on, this was mainly due to the manufacturing process the nickel plating underwent. EK covered their tracks with an “EN” model of the popular and highly acclaimed water-block, of which is clearly an inferior model. As a matter of fact, I challenged the theories of destruction behind the original “EK Supreme HF.” Mostly due to the disappointing drops in performance following the installation of the newly developed “EN” model. Here is what I found after almost a year of use…



EK Supreme HF “Nickel” 309 Days occupying my primary loop (cleaned with AC Step 1+2 and 3.5% Lemon Juice with Premium Distilled Water).




Flawless Internals

Flawless Externals

Flawless Contact Point

Image



Conclusion, I still approve of the “EK Supreme HF” as one of the best looking and best performing blocks I have ever used (I can’t say the same for the new “EN” model).



Koolance 370 CPU "Stock"



This will be the shortest segment of the comparison, and quite honestly I saved the best for last. Getting this out of the way first, I have had tremendous disappointment with Koolance water-blocks for both the GF100 (GTX480), and GF110 (GTX580) GPU-Blocks. Only, to have a much respected and admired gentlemen of which I learned almost everything about water-cooling from tell me, “there is no other block on the market as far as I’m concerned.” So, me always aiming for the clouds, decided to pick one up. Simply put, he was right…everything about the unit rocks, from build quality, installation, and performance. Koolance has indeed won this round and cleared their name with me, and in with my seal of approval, produced the best CPU water-block of 2011.



I hope you enjoyed my basic overview of 2011’s coolest water-blocks, speaking from experience...the Koolance 370 is the gamer’s choice.



Additionally, upon the request of some users on these forums I have almost completed my very in-depth coverage of using RAID 0 configured Solid State drives in conjunction with large capacity HDDs such as the Caviar Black to produce unlimited storage while maintaining the read/write of the SSDs base operation. Throughout that guide I will cover: preparation, maintenance, operating system level configuration, and BIOS, SATA striping in correct format for 128K speed.






EDIT: To further emphasize the scope of how incredible this block is...take a look at the boot/idles below.

Image







-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#1
Posted 09/12/2011 09:58 PM   
[i]Sorry for not adding this in, but I have 50 or so extra water-cooling components gathered over this year. I am sure I will think of some sort of giveaway on one or more of the sites I actively participate on. They come from me...so they are top-notch. Not to mention almost $500.00 worth of Bitspower compression fittings that need a home. [/i]

EDIT: I am preparing to open a sales/trade thread in the upcoming days with a full list.

-Hooks
Sorry for not adding this in, but I have 50 or so extra water-cooling components gathered over this year. I am sure I will think of some sort of giveaway on one or more of the sites I actively participate on. They come from me...so they are top-notch. Not to mention almost $500.00 worth of Bitspower compression fittings that need a home.



EDIT: I am preparing to open a sales/trade thread in the upcoming days with a full list.



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#2
Posted 09/12/2011 11:35 PM   
Have fun Hooks - I'm sure people will be very happy to buy them :)

Great temps BTW.
Have fun Hooks - I'm sure people will be very happy to buy them :)



Great temps BTW.

I knew I hadn't imagined it... now it's deleted = people will never know what I hadn't imagined...

"Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning."



"Never, ever, argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience"


Image



GPU-Z CPU-Z Ccleaner Driversweeper OCCT

#3
Posted 09/13/2011 05:33 PM   
I was wonder, I have a basic page on water cooling up now, but how much is a basic 3/8 setup going to cost?
I was wonder, I have a basic page on water cooling up now, but how much is a basic 3/8 setup going to cost?

#4
Posted 09/16/2011 12:09 AM   
[quote name='Vegan' date='15 September 2011 - 08:09 PM' timestamp='1316131753' post='1293538']
I was wonder, I have a basic page on water cooling up now, but how much is a basic 3/8 setup going to cost?
[/quote]

[i]It is my preference to use 1/2" ID x 1/8" wall x 3/4" OD tubing, and I always have/do.

Depending on reservoir, radiator, pump, fittings, fluid and so fourth...you can easily exceed the $500.00 mark on an "essential" configurations(average builds are roughly between $200-$300 however). My CPU + Mainboard loop is about $750.00 retail, and my 3-way GPU loop is closer to $1000.00+ street value, however I use exotic parts. It all varies really, but you can get a starter type configuration for under $200.00. With water-cooling comes a warning: "You get what you pay for."

A word of caution for your webpage Vegan, if you do not use or haven't used water-cooling in the past, you should keep your knowledge accurate, and never use someone's words as your own...it can come back to bite you. It is an entirely different world than what you usually publish on your page, and you don't want to mislead or miscalculate public information on such a topic.[/i]

-Hooks
[quote name='Vegan' date='15 September 2011 - 08:09 PM' timestamp='1316131753' post='1293538']

I was wonder, I have a basic page on water cooling up now, but how much is a basic 3/8 setup going to cost?





It is my preference to use 1/2" ID x 1/8" wall x 3/4" OD tubing, and I always have/do.



Depending on reservoir, radiator, pump, fittings, fluid and so fourth...you can easily exceed the $500.00 mark on an "essential" configurations(average builds are roughly between $200-$300 however). My CPU + Mainboard loop is about $750.00 retail, and my 3-way GPU loop is closer to $1000.00+ street value, however I use exotic parts. It all varies really, but you can get a starter type configuration for under $200.00. With water-cooling comes a warning: "You get what you pay for."



A word of caution for your webpage Vegan, if you do not use or haven't used water-cooling in the past, you should keep your knowledge accurate, and never use someone's words as your own...it can come back to bite you. It is an entirely different world than what you usually publish on your page, and you don't want to mislead or miscalculate public information on such a topic.




-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#5
Posted 09/16/2011 10:26 PM   
I only wanted to provide basic ideas as I prefer air cooling. Less mess.

I have used water on a CPU long time ago. The kit I used came for the Thermaltake chassis I was using.

It worked OK mainly due to my use of glue to seal all the fittings except the one for filling.
I only wanted to provide basic ideas as I prefer air cooling. Less mess.



I have used water on a CPU long time ago. The kit I used came for the Thermaltake chassis I was using.



It worked OK mainly due to my use of glue to seal all the fittings except the one for filling.

#6
Posted 09/17/2011 12:33 AM   
For the $$ you spent on water-cooling, I would have been more inclined to get a better rig generally

Seems your rig is nominally very high end with 3-wwal SLI etc
For the $$ you spent on water-cooling, I would have been more inclined to get a better rig generally



Seems your rig is nominally very high end with 3-wwal SLI etc

#7
Posted 09/17/2011 12:35 AM   
[quote name='Vegan' date='16 September 2011 - 08:33 PM' timestamp='1316219581' post='1294075']
I only wanted to provide basic ideas as I prefer air cooling. Less mess.

I have used water on a CPU long time ago. The kit I used came for the Thermaltake chassis I was using.

It worked OK mainly due to my use of glue to seal all the fittings except the one for filling.
[/quote]


[quote name='Vegan' date='16 September 2011 - 08:35 PM' timestamp='1316219740' post='1294078']
For the $$ you spent on water-cooling, I would have been more inclined to get a better rig generally

Seems your rig is nominally very high end with 3-wwal SLI etc
[/quote]
[i]

I will agree that air is far less complicated. On the note of your past Thermaltake kit; there are massive differences between parting out your own, and prepackaged units...mainly performance. With the options available today, water-cooling is more of an edge than anything else. I for one enjoy the art of it. It has a fine level of precision to do it right, and it took me a long time to get there. Not to mention when you look at the final product, it's gorgeous.[/i]

-Hooks
[quote name='Vegan' date='16 September 2011 - 08:33 PM' timestamp='1316219581' post='1294075']

I only wanted to provide basic ideas as I prefer air cooling. Less mess.



I have used water on a CPU long time ago. The kit I used came for the Thermaltake chassis I was using.



It worked OK mainly due to my use of glue to seal all the fittings except the one for filling.







[quote name='Vegan' date='16 September 2011 - 08:35 PM' timestamp='1316219740' post='1294078']

For the $$ you spent on water-cooling, I would have been more inclined to get a better rig generally



Seems your rig is nominally very high end with 3-wwal SLI etc







I will agree that air is far less complicated. On the note of your past Thermaltake kit; there are massive differences between parting out your own, and prepackaged units...mainly performance. With the options available today, water-cooling is more of an edge than anything else. I for one enjoy the art of it. It has a fine level of precision to do it right, and it took me a long time to get there. Not to mention when you look at the final product, it's gorgeous.




-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



"Eye of the Storm" Window Mod Tutorial <> "Inside Crysis 2" <> Top Tier Water-Blocks 2011 <> SSD Unlimited Storage Tutorial

#8
Posted 09/17/2011 02:45 AM   
Thankd for the comments
Thankd for the comments

#9
Posted 09/17/2011 12:02 PM   
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