Nvidia forever ignoring custom color profile support in full screen games? Collaboration thread.
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[b][u]Edit: January 12th 2014: Added "Borderless-Gaming" tool.[/u][/b] Edit: September 22nd 2013: Added in more workarounds sections: Windowed Borderless Gaming & CPKeeper (Color Profile Keeper). Edit: May 1st 2012: Had some success with this new borderless window tool http://forums.steampowered.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2675769 Original post: This is an on-going issue, [i]many[/i] people have this problem, yet, literally for [b]years,[/b] Nvidia has not done anything to remedy the situation... As many of you probably know, getting a game to keep your calibrated colours in fullscreen can be a chore if the game/video driver does not implement it properly. Many high budget (and low) are increasingly giving widescreen/monitor support, but the notion of colour profiles has yet to be popularized. Simply put, the developers do not see it as a big concern. But I am betting that many gamers with calibrated colours cannot stand their full screen games being reset to default colours like I do! Many triple-A titles like Dawn of War 2, ArmA, Dragon Age, etc currently do NOT support preserving colour profiles. This problem can be universally fixed for all software if the problem was addressed on the driver/video level. Unfortunately, Nvidia has been shrugging the problem off as if it is not a big deal: [quote name='Nvidia']Thank you for the update and I apologize for the confusion. After the doing further research, I found that NVIDIA does not control or have any function to control the color settings while playing games in full screen mode. Since, these features are application specific it is controlled via the applications. Therefore, please use the games setup if applicable.[/quote] Basically, whoever has custom calibrated colors for their monitors, lose the colors when a fullscreen game is launched; colors are reverted back to their default mode, making the game look rather disgusting. In the past, this was also a problem under desktop, but that has been fixed. Custom calibrated color profiles are made with hardware devices such as color calibrators, giving the monitor accurate color. Then, this profile is loaded under the OS. But games launched in fullscreen [i]overrides [/i]the profile. Nvidia has been ignoring/sidelining this problem for far too long. Many of us use custom colors, and to not support custom colors in fullscreen games is ridiculous! Below, I will be posting a few workarounds for this big problem. [u][b]1) Direct Hardware-level force (ATI ONLY)[/b][/u] If you are an ATI user, there is a very easy fix for this. Use PowerStrip, load up the color profile, and enable the setting "Write directly to palette DAC". This setting under PowerStrip allows it to bypass the driver/OS altogether and write directly to the hardware. An effective method to force calibrated colors in fullscreen games. [b]However, Nvidia has locked out this ability[/b]. EnTech, the developer behind PowerStrip explains: [quote]Write directly to palette DAC" is an EnTech expression that predates NVidia, and essentially refers to going around the OS and the display driver, and writing directly to the hardware. [b]NVidia does not approve of this method, and starting with the Geforce8 no longer shares hardware register data with EnTech.[/b][/quote] [u][b]2) Borderless windowed mode.[/b][/u] This mode has a few names; "borderless windowed mode," "frameless windowed mode" or "fullscreen windowed mode". It runs the game in fullscreen native resolution mode, without the OS borders, giving the game a "full screen" look. And since the game is running windowed, the color profiles are kept. There are two ways to do this, one is to enable it in games that natively support it. The problem with this is that an extremely few number of games support this feature. Second, with third party applications such as [url="http://grismar.net/shiftwindow/"]Shiftwindow[/url] and [url="http://gwr.orekaria.com/"]Gamers Window Relocator[/url]. It works well, however, not all games support windowed mode, it is laborious, must be manually set for each game, and just flat out does not work (even when its working). For example, the game will be removed of its borders, but the taskbar will remain on top of the game. [b][u]3) [url="http://colorclutch.sourceforge.net/"]Color Clutch[/url] [/u][/b](the author of this tool on this forum somewhere) CC is a tool to force calibrated colours in DX games through dll injections. This works for MOST games. However, this is a rather intrusive way, injecting dlls may get you kicked/banned from Steam, etc (no word if this affects VAC). It is also a bit laborious, each game needs to be set up manually, and you must launch the game through a *.bat file. This can cause problems with content-distrubtion services like Steam, where you have to launch the game through the Steam application. the author describes the problem in an email [url="http://widescreengamingforum.com/node/14191#comment-221733"]HERE[/url] and [url="http://widescreengamingforum.com/node/14191?page=2#comment-221748"]HERE[/url] [quote]Anyway, the problem is, at least on the DirectX front, not a problem of what a game doesn't do, but rather a problem of what a game does do. Full-screen Direct3D applications do not inherently screw up color calibration. The problem occurs when a specific function is called--in Direct3D9 and earlier, this is SetGammeRamp(), and in later versions it was moved to the DXGI and renamed SetGammaControl() (simply referred to as SGR()/SGC() from here on). These are the functions that cause loss of color calibration. While I can't say with 100% accuracy whether the problem itself lies in Microsoft's design of the API or the implementation by the various graphics card vendors (nVIDIA/ATi/Intel), with the problem occurring on several vendors cards I would assume it is behaving exactly how Microsoft designed it. It's even more ambiguous when you look at the documentation. There is actually a flag that can be passed to the function, D3DSGR_CALIBRATE, which "If a gamma calibrator is installed, the ramp will be modified before being sent to the device to account for the system and monitor response curves." However, upon testing, I found that this either doesn't work as expected (at least on my 5850), or works exactly as expected but the "gamma calibrator" doesn't include installed monitor profiles and therefore is seemingly useless anyway. If it doesn't include the "curves" of monitor profiles, what does it refer to then? The reasons for even calling such a function to begin with are dubious. Originally, it seems this was used by developers to "fade out" or "fade in" a scene, or provide some basic color filtering, which was not very easy to do efficiently back in the day. This doesn't seem to be in practice in any game made in the last ~5 years that I've played, judging from my experience playing them both with and without Color Clutch in use (explained later). More recently, games seem to use it in a different fashion--to provide users who have no such monitor calibration some in-game adjustment. Ultimately, developers want the game to look the same way to the end user that it looked to them, and setting gamma ramps is a quick, though incomplete and incorrect fix for this. A better way would allow users to set brightness, contrast, and gamma using a shader, which is what I believe some of the newer games are doing. For instance, I recently purchased BF:BC2, and it has brightness and contrast (no gamma) adjustments which thankfully never call SGC(). The easy fix for those who want full screen gaming while holding on to their monitor calibration is to simply not call the function. Unfortunately, most games call SGR()/SGC() no matter what, even if there have been no adjustments to the gamma in the settings. That was why I wrote Color Clutch. The theory behind it is simple--prevent the games from calling these functions, and your color calibration will survive. There aren't a whole lot of good ways to do this, so I took what I thought was the best way; injecting a DLL into the process, and then, whenever it tries to call SGR()/SGC(), instead it calls my "bogus" function with the same parameters. The only difference between the real function and mine is that my function doesn't actually do anything. As for current plans regarding Color Clutch, I'm working on support for some older versions of DirextX (specifically 6, which I think is the first version to include a SGR() function, and 7). This is made difficult by the complete lack of documentation pertaining to these old APIs, but I should eventually be able to get something out that works. OpenGL, though, has no apparent analog to SGR()/SGC(), so I don't believe I can do anything there, and I'm not entirely sure how, why, or even if some users are losing calibration on OGL games. Sorry about the long post, but I thought it was better to be thorough than lacking.[/quote] [u][b]4) [url="http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/Video-Tweak/Monitor-Calibration-Wizard.shtml"]Monitor Calibration Wizard[/url] [/b][/u] This tool works by constantly checking and reverting back the profile if it reverts back to one other then the assigned profile. The biggest problem is that this is a "soft" solution, and games/drivers that are set to override the color profile [i]will[/i] override then. Therefore, MCW works for a very small amount of games. I found the author describing the problem in an [url="http://widescreengamingforum.com/node/14191?page=3#comment-221756"]email[/url]: [quote] MCW uses some Windows API (application programming interface) to adjust the colors, basically a couple functions to set the gamma ramp lookup table. It works well within Windows, and a number of games (specifically OpenGL based games). However, support within Direct3D games become dependent on the video drivers to "care" about this lookup table and to carry the settings over into what is rendered through Direct3D. Support in that regard has typically been kept, but it does get broken from time to time by the video card driver developers. The other issue is that the video card drivers themselves have their own color correction support built in, and often that correction takes precedence over the Windows gamma ramp tables. I have an option in MCW to "apply fix to override driver level color correction", which attempts to workaround some video card driver implementations. It does this by setting the gamma ramp table twice, with two different profiles. Oddly, that has worked decent as a workaround for the video card driver implementations, but may do nothing to help in your case. In the long run, new methods other than the gamma ramp table may be needed to be used to support games. I haven't dug into it too much, but it may be possible to modify the Direct3D drawing surface being used by a game (unless Windows security prevents it). Otherwise, I would be looking at utilizing the APIs available in each video card driver. I know ATI does a good job of providing a programming interface to their drivers, so I wouldn't expect it to be difficult to get things working well on an ATI based video card. I haven't looked at nVidia yet, but I would imagine they have something similar available. Of course, going that route also means you have to build against a number of video card manufactures' programming interfaces (APIs), and support multiple versions and changes to those APIs, which gets to be a pain. This is why I think it might be better to bring pressure on the video card developers to keep proper support for the Windows gamma ramp API, so existing software doesn't break. Back when Vista came out, Microsoft broke support for the gamma ramp API, requiring application to ask for permission before it could be used. This basically broken all the calibration software out there that wasn't written for Vista, and virtually all the OpenGL based games (as far as color correction built into the games). Later, Microsoft backed down on the security so everything worked as it did before. Some of the video card manufactures also built in workarounds into the video card drivers because of how slow Microsoft was in dealing with it. There's no universal fix, but there are generally workarounds. I am a gamer myself, so I would certainly attempt to get things working within games if I can.[/quote] [u][b]5) [url="http://goebish.free.fr/cpk/"]CPKeeper (Color Profile Keeper)[/url] [/b][/u] This tool allows to apply and lock ICC profile files to keep monitors calibration even while running or quitting 3D fullscreen applications such as video games. Personally, I had limited success with this program. However... [u][b]6) [url="http://forums.steampowered.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2675769"]Windowed Borderless Gaming[/url] [/b][/u] This is my current go-to app. I use this in addition to MCW. Basically, you need to run your games in windowed mode, hit F3, and the game gets rid of borders. A really nice thing about this particular app is that you can manually tweak the window location (x and y), so you can adjust to fit your screen 100%. However, it's not compatible with ALL the games I've tried, sometimes the Windows bar would not go away. Success rate is about 99% for me. I recommend using this. As you can see, all of these workarounds are not perfect. The only absolutely "perfect" solution only exists on ATI cards, where users can directly access the hardware to force color profiles. This is not possible on Nvidia. [size="4"][b]Please feel free to add on your own workaround/solutions![/b][/size] I will update the original post. I do not see why Nvidia is not fixing this properly. When and how can we get Nvidia to properly implement fullscreen custom color support? [i]Please?[/i] [u][b]7) [url="https://github.com/Codeusa/Borderless-Gaming/releases/tag/1"]Borderless-Gaming[/url] [/b][/u] Borderless Gaming is a simple tool that will allow you to turn your windowed video games into "fullscreen" applications without all of the negative side effects I have no yet personally tested this.
Edit: January 12th 2014: Added "Borderless-Gaming" tool.

Edit: September 22nd 2013: Added in more workarounds sections: Windowed Borderless Gaming & CPKeeper (Color Profile Keeper).


Edit: May 1st 2012: Had some success with this new borderless window tool http://forums.steampowered.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2675769




Original post:
This is an on-going issue, many people have this problem, yet, literally for years, Nvidia has not done anything to remedy the situation...

As many of you probably know, getting a game to keep your calibrated colours in fullscreen can be a chore if the game/video driver does not implement it properly. Many high budget (and low) are increasingly giving widescreen/monitor support, but the notion of colour profiles has yet to be popularized. Simply put, the developers do not see it as a big concern. But I am betting that many gamers with calibrated colours cannot stand their full screen games being reset to default colours like I do! Many triple-A titles like Dawn of War 2, ArmA, Dragon Age, etc currently do NOT support preserving colour profiles.

This problem can be universally fixed for all software if the problem was addressed on the driver/video level. Unfortunately, Nvidia has been shrugging the problem off as if it is not a big deal:
Nvidia said:Thank you for the update and I apologize for the confusion.

After the doing further research, I found that NVIDIA does not control or have any function to control the color settings while playing games in full screen mode. Since, these features are application specific it is controlled via the applications. Therefore, please use the games setup if applicable.


Basically, whoever has custom calibrated colors for their monitors, lose the colors when a fullscreen game is launched; colors are reverted back to their default mode, making the game look rather disgusting. In the past, this was also a problem under desktop, but that has been fixed.

Custom calibrated color profiles are made with hardware devices such as color calibrators, giving the monitor accurate color. Then, this profile is loaded under the OS. But games launched in fullscreen overrides the profile.

Nvidia has been ignoring/sidelining this problem for far too long. Many of us use custom colors, and to not support custom colors in fullscreen games is ridiculous! Below, I will be posting a few workarounds for this big problem.

1) Direct Hardware-level force (ATI ONLY) If you are an ATI user, there is a very easy fix for this. Use PowerStrip, load up the color profile, and enable the setting "Write directly to palette DAC". This setting under PowerStrip allows it to bypass the driver/OS altogether and write directly to the hardware. An effective method to force calibrated colors in fullscreen games. However, Nvidia has locked out this ability. EnTech, the developer behind PowerStrip explains:
Write directly to palette DAC" is an EnTech expression that predates NVidia, and essentially refers to going around the OS and the display driver, and writing directly to the hardware. NVidia does not approve of this method, and starting with the Geforce8 no longer shares hardware register data with EnTech.


2) Borderless windowed mode. This mode has a few names; "borderless windowed mode," "frameless windowed mode" or "fullscreen windowed mode". It runs the game in fullscreen native resolution mode, without the OS borders, giving the game a "full screen" look. And since the game is running windowed, the color profiles are kept. There are two ways to do this, one is to enable it in games that natively support it. The problem with this is that an extremely few number of games support this feature. Second, with third party applications such as Shiftwindow and Gamers Window Relocator. It works well, however, not all games support windowed mode, it is laborious, must be manually set for each game, and just flat out does not work (even when its working). For example, the game will be removed of its borders, but the taskbar will remain on top of the game.

3) Color Clutch (the author of this tool on this forum somewhere)
CC is a tool to force calibrated colours in DX games through dll injections. This works for MOST games. However, this is a rather intrusive way, injecting dlls may get you kicked/banned from Steam, etc (no word if this affects VAC). It is also a bit laborious, each game needs to be set up manually, and you must launch the game through a *.bat file. This can cause problems with content-distrubtion services like Steam, where you have to launch the game through the Steam application.

the author describes the problem in an email HERE and HERE
Anyway, the problem is, at least on the DirectX front, not a problem of what a game doesn't do, but rather a problem of what a game does do. Full-screen Direct3D applications do not inherently screw up color calibration. The problem occurs when a specific function is called--in Direct3D9 and earlier, this is SetGammeRamp(), and in later versions it was moved to the DXGI and renamed SetGammaControl() (simply referred to as SGR()/SGC() from here on). These are the functions that cause loss of color calibration. While I can't say with 100% accuracy whether the problem itself lies in Microsoft's design of the API or the implementation by the various graphics card vendors (nVIDIA/ATi/Intel), with the problem occurring on several vendors cards I would assume it is behaving exactly how Microsoft designed it.

It's even more ambiguous when you look at the documentation. There is actually a flag that can be passed to the function, D3DSGR_CALIBRATE, which "If a gamma calibrator is installed, the ramp will be modified before being sent to the device to account for the system and monitor response curves." However, upon testing, I found that this either doesn't work as expected (at least on my 5850), or works exactly as expected but the "gamma calibrator" doesn't include installed monitor profiles and therefore is seemingly useless anyway. If it doesn't include the "curves" of monitor profiles, what does it refer to then?

The reasons for even calling such a function to begin with are dubious. Originally, it seems this was used by developers to "fade out" or "fade in" a scene, or provide some basic color filtering, which was not very easy to do efficiently back in the day. This doesn't seem to be in practice in any game made in the last ~5 years that I've played, judging from my experience playing them both with and without Color Clutch in use (explained later).

More recently, games seem to use it in a different fashion--to provide users who have no such monitor calibration some in-game adjustment. Ultimately, developers want the game to look the same way to the end user that it looked to them, and setting gamma ramps is a quick, though incomplete and incorrect fix for this. A better way would allow users to set brightness, contrast, and gamma using a shader, which is what I believe some of the newer games are doing. For instance, I recently purchased BF:BC2, and it has brightness and contrast (no gamma) adjustments which thankfully never call SGC().

The easy fix for those who want full screen gaming while holding on to their monitor calibration is to simply not call the function. Unfortunately, most games call SGR()/SGC() no matter what, even if there have been no adjustments to the gamma in the settings. That was why I wrote Color Clutch. The theory behind it is simple--prevent the games from calling these functions, and your color calibration will survive. There aren't a whole lot of good ways to do this, so I took what I thought was the best way; injecting a DLL into the process, and then, whenever it tries to call SGR()/SGC(), instead it calls my "bogus" function with the same parameters. The only difference between the real function and mine is that my function doesn't actually do anything.

As for current plans regarding Color Clutch, I'm working on support for some older versions of DirextX (specifically 6, which I think is the first version to include a SGR() function, and 7). This is made difficult by the complete lack of documentation pertaining to these old APIs, but I should eventually be able to get something out that works. OpenGL, though, has no apparent analog to SGR()/SGC(), so I don't believe I can do anything there, and I'm not entirely sure how, why, or even if some users are losing calibration on OGL games.

Sorry about the long post, but I thought it was better to be thorough than lacking.



4) Monitor Calibration Wizard
This tool works by constantly checking and reverting back the profile if it reverts back to one other then the assigned profile. The biggest problem is that this is a "soft" solution, and games/drivers that are set to override the color profile will override then. Therefore, MCW works for a very small amount of games.

I found the author describing the problem in an email:

MCW uses some Windows API (application programming interface) to adjust the colors, basically a couple functions to set the gamma ramp lookup table. It works well within Windows, and a number of games (specifically OpenGL based games). However, support within Direct3D games become dependent on the video drivers to "care" about this lookup table and to carry the settings over into what is rendered through Direct3D. Support in that regard has typically been kept, but it does get broken from time to time by the video card driver developers.

The other issue is that the video card drivers themselves have their own color correction support built in, and often that correction takes precedence over the Windows gamma ramp tables. I have an option in MCW to "apply fix to override driver level color correction", which attempts to workaround some video card driver implementations. It does this by setting the gamma ramp table twice, with two different profiles. Oddly, that has worked decent as a workaround for the video card driver implementations, but may do nothing to help in your case.

In the long run, new methods other than the gamma ramp table may be needed to be used to support games. I haven't dug into it too much, but it may be possible to modify the Direct3D drawing surface being used by a game (unless Windows security prevents it). Otherwise, I would be looking at utilizing the APIs available in each video card driver. I know ATI does a good job of providing a programming interface to their drivers, so I wouldn't expect it to be difficult to get things working well on an ATI based video card. I haven't looked at nVidia yet, but I would imagine they have something similar available. Of course, going that route also means you have to build against a number of video card manufactures' programming interfaces (APIs), and support multiple versions and changes to those APIs, which gets to be a pain. This is why I think it might be better to bring pressure on the video card developers to keep proper support for the Windows gamma ramp API, so existing software doesn't break.

Back when Vista came out, Microsoft broke support for the gamma ramp API, requiring application to ask for permission before it could be used. This basically broken all the calibration software out there that wasn't written for Vista, and virtually all the OpenGL based games (as far as color correction built into the games). Later, Microsoft backed down on the security so everything worked as it did before. Some of the video card manufactures also built in workarounds into the video card drivers because of how slow Microsoft was in dealing with it.

There's no universal fix, but there are generally workarounds. I am a gamer myself, so I would certainly attempt to get things working within games if I can.





5) CPKeeper (Color Profile Keeper)

This tool allows to apply and lock ICC profile files to keep monitors calibration even while running or quitting 3D fullscreen applications such as video games.

Personally, I had limited success with this program. However...


6) Windowed Borderless Gaming

This is my current go-to app. I use this in addition to MCW. Basically, you need to run your games in windowed mode, hit F3, and the game gets rid of borders. A really nice thing about this particular app is that you can manually tweak the window location (x and y), so you can adjust to fit your screen 100%. However, it's not compatible with ALL the games I've tried, sometimes the Windows bar would not go away. Success rate is about 99% for me. I recommend using this.


As you can see, all of these workarounds are not perfect. The only absolutely "perfect" solution only exists on ATI cards, where users can directly access the hardware to force color profiles. This is not possible on Nvidia. Please feel free to add on your own workaround/solutions! I will update the original post.

I do not see why Nvidia is not fixing this properly. When and how can we get Nvidia to properly implement fullscreen custom color support? Please?


7) Borderless-Gaming

Borderless Gaming is a simple tool that will allow you to turn your windowed video games into "fullscreen" applications without all of the negative side effects

I have no yet personally tested this.

#1
Posted 09/03/2011 04:13 AM   
Some threads out of the many on the same problem:

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=206665 "Fullscreen games won't hold Nvidia's color calibrations"
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=191706 "Fullscreen games not holding color calibration Nvidia cards won't hold calibrated settings while ATI will"
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=156011 "none of forced color settingt working in fullscreen DX games"
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=194462 "COlor/gamma in fullscreen games off"
http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=99839 "Nothing happens in games runned in full screen"
Some threads out of the many on the same problem:



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=206665
"Fullscreen games won't hold Nvidia's color calibrations"

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=191706
"Fullscreen games not holding color calibration Nvidia cards won't hold calibrated settings while ATI will"

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=156011
"none of forced color settingt working in fullscreen DX games"

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=194462
"COlor/gamma in fullscreen games off"

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=99839
"Nothing happens in games runned in full screen"

#2
Posted 09/03/2011 04:15 AM   
I agree that color profiles and/or true color management would be a great feature. Unfortunately, since NVIDIA's own color settings panel has been broken for several of the latest driver versions, I think we're still a long ways off from reaching that goal.
I agree that color profiles and/or true color management would be a great feature. Unfortunately, since NVIDIA's own color settings panel has been broken for several of the latest driver versions, I think we're still a long ways off from reaching that goal.

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#3
Posted 09/03/2011 05:29 PM   
NVIDIA supports color better on the Quadro cards but gaming cards, they do not seem to care
NVIDIA supports color better on the Quadro cards but gaming cards, they do not seem to care

#4
Posted 09/03/2011 05:58 PM   
I created this account solely to post a thread complaining about this. Apparently there was no need to though, because the op did it all for me.

I previously owned an ATI HD5870 card, and for all the problems they had with their drivers, they did one thing perfectly, and that was their implementation of color adjustment. You can adjust the color balance through their drivers and they apply to [i]everything.[/i] Being able to do this is pretty much a necessity for me, because the colors and contrast on my monitor always look a bit odd no matter how I adjust them. More specifically, the color specific contrast balance is all wrong and that isn't something I can fix through the monitor's settings. It requires the fine level of control offered through my card's drivers.

I switched to a high end nVidia card not too long ago, and I'm satisfied with everything it has to offer, except its horrible color adjustment system. I love the amount of control it gives me over the colors, however, it only applies to some games, and I have to reactivate it every time I start up my computer. This is a big deal to someone like me. I care a great deal about how the image looks, and I imagine that anyone who's enough of an enthusiast to purchase an expensive high end video card cares too. I find it incredibly surprising that nVidia hasn't stepped their game up in this area, considering their impressive level quality they offer with most everything else they do. Perhaps this is a concession made to give game developers more control over how their games look? If so, it's misguided, because their games are going to look different on different monitors anyway.

If there's one thing that would keep me a happy nVidia customer, it's better color adjustment support through their drivers. As it is, ATI's drivers have getting better and better after AMD bought them out... /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />
I created this account solely to post a thread complaining about this. Apparently there was no need to though, because the op did it all for me.



I previously owned an ATI HD5870 card, and for all the problems they had with their drivers, they did one thing perfectly, and that was their implementation of color adjustment. You can adjust the color balance through their drivers and they apply to everything. Being able to do this is pretty much a necessity for me, because the colors and contrast on my monitor always look a bit odd no matter how I adjust them. More specifically, the color specific contrast balance is all wrong and that isn't something I can fix through the monitor's settings. It requires the fine level of control offered through my card's drivers.



I switched to a high end nVidia card not too long ago, and I'm satisfied with everything it has to offer, except its horrible color adjustment system. I love the amount of control it gives me over the colors, however, it only applies to some games, and I have to reactivate it every time I start up my computer. This is a big deal to someone like me. I care a great deal about how the image looks, and I imagine that anyone who's enough of an enthusiast to purchase an expensive high end video card cares too. I find it incredibly surprising that nVidia hasn't stepped their game up in this area, considering their impressive level quality they offer with most everything else they do. Perhaps this is a concession made to give game developers more control over how their games look? If so, it's misguided, because their games are going to look different on different monitors anyway.



If there's one thing that would keep me a happy nVidia customer, it's better color adjustment support through their drivers. As it is, ATI's drivers have getting better and better after AMD bought them out... /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

#5
Posted 09/05/2011 02:48 AM   
I also have had this problem for years, trying to find a solution always without success. I was shocked when i switched from my last GPU (ATI) to an NVidia card, just to discover that i couldnt apply my color profiles.

Registered only to voice my support for the OP. NVidia finally needs to address this issue, though i fear that all this is working as intended, with some political **** going on in the background.

As long as this keeps being ignored, my only solution will be to vote with my purse and to stop supporting this company with my money.
I also have had this problem for years, trying to find a solution always without success. I was shocked when i switched from my last GPU (ATI) to an NVidia card, just to discover that i couldnt apply my color profiles.



Registered only to voice my support for the OP. NVidia finally needs to address this issue, though i fear that all this is working as intended, with some political **** going on in the background.



As long as this keeps being ignored, my only solution will be to vote with my purse and to stop supporting this company with my money.

#6
Posted 09/07/2011 08:45 AM   
[quote=Beast Mode] I have to reactivate it every time I start up my computer. [/quote] That's supposed to be fixed very soon. With Windows XP that particular problem doesn't exist, and the settings in the control panel are applied properly in most or all of the games I play.
Beast Mode said:
I have to reactivate it every time I start up my computer.


That's supposed to be fixed very soon.

With Windows XP that particular problem doesn't exist, and the settings in the control panel are applied properly in most or all of the games I play.

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#7
Posted 09/07/2011 08:55 AM   
probably nvidia assumes all users with monitors that aren't perfect either change them or switch to AMD hardware /wallbash.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wallbash:' />

I almost bought AMD card when I was forced to play some RTS/RPG windowed mode because of my monitor badly needed color profiles /wallbash.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wallbash:' /> If I hadn't played other games on plasma tv then I would ditch Nvidia long time ago just because of this stupid move nvidia made not to share information with EnTech...

What problem it woud pose to impelent saving custom LUTs and then calculate DAC LUT with those saved LUTs and what sytem/game want? It shouldn't take more than few days of programming /thumbsdown.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsdown:' />

And there is one more thing. Nvidia hardware is capable of dithering (I saw it on Linux drivers) to achieve virtually more bit-depth so it would be possible to get rid of banding when color profiles are applied. Why such feature isn't implemented? Or it is on quadro only? /angry.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':angry:' />

@[b]nvtweakman[/b]
nvidia controls are shi...
we want custom LUTs as there are a lot of good monitors with flaws that can only be corrected with calibration...
nvidia had loading ICC profiles directly in their control panel. They removed it long time ago...
probably nvidia assumes all users with monitors that aren't perfect either change them or switch to AMD hardware /wallbash.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wallbash:' />



I almost bought AMD card when I was forced to play some RTS/RPG windowed mode because of my monitor badly needed color profiles /wallbash.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':wallbash:' /> If I hadn't played other games on plasma tv then I would ditch Nvidia long time ago just because of this stupid move nvidia made not to share information with EnTech...



What problem it woud pose to impelent saving custom LUTs and then calculate DAC LUT with those saved LUTs and what sytem/game want? It shouldn't take more than few days of programming /thumbsdown.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsdown:' />



And there is one more thing. Nvidia hardware is capable of dithering (I saw it on Linux drivers) to achieve virtually more bit-depth so it would be possible to get rid of banding when color profiles are applied. Why such feature isn't implemented? Or it is on quadro only? /angry.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':angry:' />



@nvtweakman

nvidia controls are shi...

we want custom LUTs as there are a lot of good monitors with flaws that can only be corrected with calibration...

nvidia had loading ICC profiles directly in their control panel. They removed it long time ago...

i7 @ 4GHz

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#8
Posted 09/07/2011 11:37 AM   
[quote=xor_2] @[b]nvtweakman[/b] we want custom LUTs as there are a lot of good monitors with flaws that can only be corrected with calibration... nvidia had loading ICC profiles directly in their control panel. They removed it long time ago... [/quote] I realize that. I also realize most people are fine with standard control panel settings... and those are the people I was addressing in my last post.
xor_2 said:
@nvtweakman
we want custom LUTs as there are a lot of good monitors with flaws that can only be corrected with calibration...
nvidia had loading ICC profiles directly in their control panel. They removed it long time ago...


I realize that. I also realize most people are fine with standard control panel settings... and those are the people I was addressing in my last post.

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#9
Posted 09/07/2011 11:57 AM   
I found a workaround for Deus Ex Human Revolution. Quite a hilarious workaround, actually.

You have to enable the language bar and a secondary language input enabled. The language bar must not be docked into the task bar. Have it floating independently, always on top.

Start DE:HR, the game will override any custom colors. Then hit your change language/input button, the language bar will magically overlay your custom colors over the game as it changes languages! I am guessing the language bar "brings" the custom color profile used in Windows to the game. And since the language bar is "always" on top, it overrides' the game's color defaults. This is purely a guess. But it works.

Remember to set the language back into a corner with transparency, so that it does not interfere with your game.

DE:HR looks so much better with accurate colors. No more whitey-washed out hue.



NVIDIA, PLEASE LISTEN TO US ABOUT CUSTOM COLOURS!!!
I found a workaround for Deus Ex Human Revolution. Quite a hilarious workaround, actually.



You have to enable the language bar and a secondary language input enabled. The language bar must not be docked into the task bar. Have it floating independently, always on top.



Start DE:HR, the game will override any custom colors. Then hit your change language/input button, the language bar will magically overlay your custom colors over the game as it changes languages! I am guessing the language bar "brings" the custom color profile used in Windows to the game. And since the language bar is "always" on top, it overrides' the game's color defaults. This is purely a guess. But it works.



Remember to set the language back into a corner with transparency, so that it does not interfere with your game.



DE:HR looks so much better with accurate colors. No more whitey-washed out hue.







NVIDIA, PLEASE LISTEN TO US ABOUT CUSTOM COLOURS!!!

#10
Posted 09/15/2011 06:11 AM   
As someone who uses custom .icc profiles, this is a really annoying issue to not have supported at a driver level. I would love to be able to see my games in their true colours. I would be a very happy customer if you guys were to implement this!
As someone who uses custom .icc profiles, this is a really annoying issue to not have supported at a driver level. I would love to be able to see my games in their true colours. I would be a very happy customer if you guys were to implement this!

#11
Posted 09/19/2011 05:14 PM   
true colours? rotflmao

the game is output as its intended.
true colours? rotflmao



the game is output as its intended.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
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#12
Posted 09/19/2011 09:51 PM   
[quote name='Sora' date='19 September 2011 - 10:51 PM' timestamp='1316469091' post='1295459']
true colours? rotflmao

the game is output as its intended.
[/quote]

Most monitors are not calibrated out of the box so no, it isn't.
[quote name='Sora' date='19 September 2011 - 10:51 PM' timestamp='1316469091' post='1295459']

true colours? rotflmao



the game is output as its intended.





Most monitors are not calibrated out of the box so no, it isn't.

#13
Posted 09/20/2011 06:23 PM   
hence why your display has an ON SCREEN DISPLAY which includes panel adjustment controls.
hence why your display has an ON SCREEN DISPLAY which includes panel adjustment controls.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#14
Posted 09/20/2011 09:32 PM   
do yourself a favor and read the thread. else you risk being perceived as uneducated and ignorant.

we are talking about color profiles that change the LUT so colors look different on your monitor. a monitor has no calibration for colors.
do yourself a favor and read the thread. else you risk being perceived as uneducated and ignorant.



we are talking about color profiles that change the LUT so colors look different on your monitor. a monitor has no calibration for colors.

#15
Posted 09/21/2011 02:24 AM   
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