UpdatusUser
I've recently updated the driver my nVidia's video card and discovered as a lot a new folder in the list of users of my computer: "UpdatusUser". I've read some topics about this, I don't want to add a new one on the technical point of view.

Just to emphasise that privacy is better understandable when users management remains under the control of the owner of the computer.

And to ask nVidia:
how a new update method can be an improvement if changes are inserted into the private area of the owner of a computer?

Please revert back quickly with the next driver update.
I've recently updated the driver my nVidia's video card and discovered as a lot a new folder in the list of users of my computer: "UpdatusUser". I've read some topics about this, I don't want to add a new one on the technical point of view.



Just to emphasise that privacy is better understandable when users management remains under the control of the owner of the computer.



And to ask nVidia:

how a new update method can be an improvement if changes are inserted into the private area of the owner of a computer?



Please revert back quickly with the next driver update.

#1
Posted 06/11/2011 08:17 PM   
NVIDIA is not the only one who creates a separate user for services.

So far, noone has provided any proof that this is a security/privacy risk. As I've mentioned in other topics, it's possible that NVIDIA is actually [i]increasing[/i] security with their method.

The user is easy to remove or avoid. Just do a custom install and deselect NVIDIA update, or uninstall it.
NVIDIA is not the only one who creates a separate user for services.



So far, noone has provided any proof that this is a security/privacy risk. As I've mentioned in other topics, it's possible that NVIDIA is actually increasing security with their method.



The user is easy to remove or avoid. Just do a custom install and deselect NVIDIA update, or uninstall it.

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#2
Posted 06/11/2011 09:00 PM   
[quote name='nvtweakman' date='11 June 2011 - 03:00 PM' timestamp='1307826003' post='1250586']
NVIDIA is not the only one who creates a separate user for services.

So far, noone has provided any proof that this is a security/privacy risk. As I've mentioned in other topics, it's possible that NVIDIA is actually [i]increasing[/i] security with their method.

The user is easy to remove or avoid. Just do a custom install and deselect NVIDIA update, or uninstall it.
[/quote]

The use of a new user to handle system services for driver updates is not a security risk in and of itself, but MANY secure networks, including many using Active Directory, direct permissions for new users, and completely shut down the utility of UpdateusUser to manage updates, making it entirely useless. For home users, UpdateusUser is not a problem, but NVIDIA update will not work for many, if not most, secure networks. Overall, therefore, the NVIDIA Update system using a new user to manage update services is inherently flawed. Apparently NVIDIA did not have managed network security in mind when designing it.

Here is a thread which talks about the problem:

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=201230&view=findpost&p=1242217
[quote name='nvtweakman' date='11 June 2011 - 03:00 PM' timestamp='1307826003' post='1250586']

NVIDIA is not the only one who creates a separate user for services.



So far, noone has provided any proof that this is a security/privacy risk. As I've mentioned in other topics, it's possible that NVIDIA is actually increasing security with their method.



The user is easy to remove or avoid. Just do a custom install and deselect NVIDIA update, or uninstall it.





The use of a new user to handle system services for driver updates is not a security risk in and of itself, but MANY secure networks, including many using Active Directory, direct permissions for new users, and completely shut down the utility of UpdateusUser to manage updates, making it entirely useless. For home users, UpdateusUser is not a problem, but NVIDIA update will not work for many, if not most, secure networks. Overall, therefore, the NVIDIA Update system using a new user to manage update services is inherently flawed. Apparently NVIDIA did not have managed network security in mind when designing it.



Here is a thread which talks about the problem:



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=201230&view=findpost&p=1242217

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#3
Posted 06/12/2011 03:18 PM   
[quote name='Loucou' date='11 June 2011 - 10:17 PM' timestamp='1307823432' post='1250567']UpdatusUser[/quote]
Talk about an insane idea.. Anyway, disable UAC, antivirus and firewall (& similar), remove your administrator password and after rebooting install the latest (280.26) drivers via custom and clean. After the install, turn off the checkmark from the tray to check for updates automatically and stop the update service (run... services.msc); Then just use the Control Panel to uninstall the Nvidia update, switch everything back on and try to forget about this nightmare. :)
[quote name='Loucou' date='11 June 2011 - 10:17 PM' timestamp='1307823432' post='1250567']UpdatusUser

Talk about an insane idea.. Anyway, disable UAC, antivirus and firewall (& similar), remove your administrator password and after rebooting install the latest (280.26) drivers via custom and clean. After the install, turn off the checkmark from the tray to check for updates automatically and stop the update service (run... services.msc); Then just use the Control Panel to uninstall the Nvidia update, switch everything back on and try to forget about this nightmare. :)

[sup]MSI P67S-C43 / Intel i5-2400 / DDR3 2x2GB 1600MHz / GeForce GTS450 Palit / WD 1TB SATA6 64MB / Win7 Pro/64 SP1[/sup]

#4
Posted 08/27/2011 09:22 PM   
[quote name='nimd4' date='27 August 2011 - 05:22 PM' timestamp='1314480166' post='1285075']
Talk about an insane idea.. Anyway, disable UAC, antivirus and firewall (& similar), remove your administrator password and after rebooting install the latest (280.26) drivers via custom and clean. After the install, turn off the checkmark from the tray to check for updates automatically and stop the update service (run... services.msc); Then just use the Control Panel to uninstall the Nvidia update, switch everything back on and try to forget about this nightmare. :)
[/quote]

It's easier just to deselect the checkbox so that NVIDIA Update was never even installed in the first place /tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':tongue:' />
[quote name='nimd4' date='27 August 2011 - 05:22 PM' timestamp='1314480166' post='1285075']

Talk about an insane idea.. Anyway, disable UAC, antivirus and firewall (& similar), remove your administrator password and after rebooting install the latest (280.26) drivers via custom and clean. After the install, turn off the checkmark from the tray to check for updates automatically and stop the update service (run... services.msc); Then just use the Control Panel to uninstall the Nvidia update, switch everything back on and try to forget about this nightmare. :)





It's easier just to deselect the checkbox so that NVIDIA Update was never even installed in the first place /tongue.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':tongue:' />

"This is your code. These are also your bugs. Really. Yes, the API runtime and the
driver have bugs, but this is not one of them. Now go fix it already." -fgiesen

#5
Posted 08/28/2011 02:33 AM   
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