SSD vs HDD I am considering upgrading
Large capacity hard drives should be used for mass-storage such as photos, music, video, text documents, whatever. Right now, I have a Hitachi 7200RPM 2TB hard drive, and I am considering putting a 128GB SSD in my computer to make a few games run significantly faster. About how much more performance does an SSD offer over a standard hard drive? I heard loading times in games are cut in less than half in most cases. Also, do games run smoother and feel more responsive?

SSD's are extremely expensive, a 512GB can cost more than $600. I don't have that kind of money to spend right now. So I'm going to go with a ~128GB to install about 6-7 games on or so. Particularly Battlefield 3 (when it comes out).

I have a few more questions about solid state drives. I have never used an SSD before, so I am not familiar with them. All I know is that they are many times faster than standard hard drives.

*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?
*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?
*Will I notice significant increase in performance?
*Some solid state drives have a "TRIM" feature, what is "TRIM" and how do I know if my SSD has it?
*Does it come with software/drivers?
*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.
Large capacity hard drives should be used for mass-storage such as photos, music, video, text documents, whatever. Right now, I have a Hitachi 7200RPM 2TB hard drive, and I am considering putting a 128GB SSD in my computer to make a few games run significantly faster. About how much more performance does an SSD offer over a standard hard drive? I heard loading times in games are cut in less than half in most cases. Also, do games run smoother and feel more responsive?



SSD's are extremely expensive, a 512GB can cost more than $600. I don't have that kind of money to spend right now. So I'm going to go with a ~128GB to install about 6-7 games on or so. Particularly Battlefield 3 (when it comes out).



I have a few more questions about solid state drives. I have never used an SSD before, so I am not familiar with them. All I know is that they are many times faster than standard hard drives.



*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?

*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?

*Will I notice significant increase in performance?

*Some solid state drives have a "TRIM" feature, what is "TRIM" and how do I know if my SSD has it?

*Does it come with software/drivers?

*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.

An infinite number of Monkeys, using an infinite number of typewriters, given an infinite amount of time, will eventually print up Shakespeare's entire works.

#1
Posted 06/08/2011 03:21 AM   
[quote name='Monkey_Business' date='07 June 2011 - 08:21 PM' timestamp='1307503260' post='1249033']
Large capacity hard drives should be used for mass-storage such as photos, music, video, text documents, whatever. Right now, I have a Hitachi 7200RPM 2TB hard drive, and I am considering putting a 128GB SSD in my computer to make a few games run significantly faster. About how much more performance does an SSD offer over a standard hard drive? I heard loading times in games are cut in less than half in most cases. Also, do games run smoother and feel more responsive?

SSD's are extremely expensive, a 512GB can cost more than $600. I don't have that kind of money to spend right now. So I'm going to go with a ~128GB to install about 6-7 games on or so. Particularly Battlefield 3 (when it comes out).

I have a few more questions about solid state drives. I have never used an SSD before, so I am not familiar with them. All I know is that they are many times faster than standard hard drives.

*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?
*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?
*Will I notice significant increase in performance?
*Some solid state drives have a "TRIM" feature, what is "TRIM" and how do I know if my SSD has it?
*Does it come with software/drivers?
*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.
[/quote]

* from what i heard you can run like 15 ssds for the same power as a single spinner drive....i heard
*yes they use reg sata cables
*yes, depending on what you do with it. Games load faster or your os is more responsive. Id use it for the os myself and put your games on a spinner drive or just a few games on it along with the os. This offers the best performance gains overall imo
*my intel came with a disk.. intel toolbox its called. Not exactly sure as its been awhile since i used it
*By the time your ssd dies there will much better ones, more gbs and be far cheaper. Go for it

Trim keeps the drive "fresh", responsive.

I like my 1tb for storage but the rest of my drives are ssds. Best single upgrade you can do for performance.

Good luck
[quote name='Monkey_Business' date='07 June 2011 - 08:21 PM' timestamp='1307503260' post='1249033']

Large capacity hard drives should be used for mass-storage such as photos, music, video, text documents, whatever. Right now, I have a Hitachi 7200RPM 2TB hard drive, and I am considering putting a 128GB SSD in my computer to make a few games run significantly faster. About how much more performance does an SSD offer over a standard hard drive? I heard loading times in games are cut in less than half in most cases. Also, do games run smoother and feel more responsive?



SSD's are extremely expensive, a 512GB can cost more than $600. I don't have that kind of money to spend right now. So I'm going to go with a ~128GB to install about 6-7 games on or so. Particularly Battlefield 3 (when it comes out).



I have a few more questions about solid state drives. I have never used an SSD before, so I am not familiar with them. All I know is that they are many times faster than standard hard drives.



*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?

*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?

*Will I notice significant increase in performance?

*Some solid state drives have a "TRIM" feature, what is "TRIM" and how do I know if my SSD has it?

*Does it come with software/drivers?

*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.





* from what i heard you can run like 15 ssds for the same power as a single spinner drive....i heard

*yes they use reg sata cables

*yes, depending on what you do with it. Games load faster or your os is more responsive. Id use it for the os myself and put your games on a spinner drive or just a few games on it along with the os. This offers the best performance gains overall imo

*my intel came with a disk.. intel toolbox its called. Not exactly sure as its been awhile since i used it

*By the time your ssd dies there will much better ones, more gbs and be far cheaper. Go for it



Trim keeps the drive "fresh", responsive.



I like my 1tb for storage but the rest of my drives are ssds. Best single upgrade you can do for performance.



Good luck
#2
Posted 06/08/2011 05:27 AM   
honestly, for gaming, it doenst make a lot of difference. only games that benefit are the ones that stream content as you go. MMOs, RPGs and open ended exploration games (just cause 2, gta4, etc) those are the genres that actually benefit.

get an SSD for windows mate, the only thing you'll see from the vast majority of games running on an ssd is reduced loading times with no effect on fps.
honestly, for gaming, it doenst make a lot of difference. only games that benefit are the ones that stream content as you go. MMOs, RPGs and open ended exploration games (just cause 2, gta4, etc) those are the genres that actually benefit.



get an SSD for windows mate, the only thing you'll see from the vast majority of games running on an ssd is reduced loading times with no effect on fps.

#3
Posted 06/08/2011 09:31 AM   
[i]Solid state drives have a much lower seek latency than conventional hard drives, even 10k Raptors in RAID 0 cannot reach the same efficiency. To make a long answer short, SSD use can improve overall load times and the gathering of needed information from certain game titles. In other words there are improvements, but it isn't necessarily universal. I currently use OCZ Vertex 2(160Gig x2) SSD in RAID 0 on my main system, because I do not demand large quantities of free space on my gaming rig. This is arguably the fastest storage configuration for gaming, without using Revodrives(SSD variant). Important as well, Solid States have improved over time in both quality, and durability. If you can afford to use them, especially for your operating system partition I would recommend it, provided you do not require large headroom for file storage. If so, just use a 1TB HDD for storage. [/i]

EDIT: [i]This is a question that has been answered many times over FYI.
[/i]
-Hooks
Solid state drives have a much lower seek latency than conventional hard drives, even 10k Raptors in RAID 0 cannot reach the same efficiency. To make a long answer short, SSD use can improve overall load times and the gathering of needed information from certain game titles. In other words there are improvements, but it isn't necessarily universal. I currently use OCZ Vertex 2(160Gig x2) SSD in RAID 0 on my main system, because I do not demand large quantities of free space on my gaming rig. This is arguably the fastest storage configuration for gaming, without using Revodrives(SSD variant). Important as well, Solid States have improved over time in both quality, and durability. If you can afford to use them, especially for your operating system partition I would recommend it, provided you do not require large headroom for file storage. If so, just use a 1TB HDD for storage.



EDIT: This is a question that has been answered many times over FYI.



-Hooks

QUOTE (The Professor @ Oct 31 2010, 04:59 AM)

*Jeremy Clarkson face*



So we must hand it over to our tame PC tweaker. Some say he sticky tapes a block of uranium to his dinner before eating it and that he sucks moisture out of ducks. All we know is, he's called Hooks.



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#4
Posted 06/08/2011 12:04 PM   
[quote name='Righthooks' date='08 June 2011 - 04:04 AM' timestamp='1307534647' post='1249149']
[i]Solid state drives have a much lower seek latency than conventional hard drives, even 10k Raptors in RAID 0 cannot reach the same efficiency. To make a long answer short, SSD use can improve overall load times and the gathering of needed information from certain game titles. In other words there are improvements, but it isn't necessarily universal. I currently use OCZ Vertex 2(160Gig x2) SSD in RAID 0 on my main system, because I do not demand large quantities of free space on my gaming rig. This is arguably the fastest storage configuration for gaming, without using Revodrives(SSD variant). Important as well, Solid States have improved over time in both quality, and durability. If you can afford to use them, especially for your operating system partition I would recommend it, provided you do not require large headroom for file storage. If so, just use a 1TB HDD for storage. [/i]

EDIT: [i]This is a question that has been answered many times over FYI.
[/i]
-Hooks
[/quote]

The Corsair Force 3 120GB SATA 3 SDD is on sale at my local electronics store for $199.99. I think this might be the best choice for my price range. It has SATA 3 speeds, meaning that it is significantly faster than SATA 1 and 2 SDD's. And I do believe that my motherboard (MSI Big Bang Xpower X58) supports USB 3.0 and SATA 3.

http://www.corsair.com/solid-state-drives/force-series-3/force-series-3-120gb-sata-3-6gbps-solid-state-hard-drive.html

Should I reinstall my OS onto the SDD?
[quote name='Righthooks' date='08 June 2011 - 04:04 AM' timestamp='1307534647' post='1249149']

Solid state drives have a much lower seek latency than conventional hard drives, even 10k Raptors in RAID 0 cannot reach the same efficiency. To make a long answer short, SSD use can improve overall load times and the gathering of needed information from certain game titles. In other words there are improvements, but it isn't necessarily universal. I currently use OCZ Vertex 2(160Gig x2) SSD in RAID 0 on my main system, because I do not demand large quantities of free space on my gaming rig. This is arguably the fastest storage configuration for gaming, without using Revodrives(SSD variant). Important as well, Solid States have improved over time in both quality, and durability. If you can afford to use them, especially for your operating system partition I would recommend it, provided you do not require large headroom for file storage. If so, just use a 1TB HDD for storage.



EDIT: This is a question that has been answered many times over FYI.



-Hooks





The Corsair Force 3 120GB SATA 3 SDD is on sale at my local electronics store for $199.99. I think this might be the best choice for my price range. It has SATA 3 speeds, meaning that it is significantly faster than SATA 1 and 2 SDD's. And I do believe that my motherboard (MSI Big Bang Xpower X58) supports USB 3.0 and SATA 3.



http://www.corsair.com/solid-state-drives/force-series-3/force-series-3-120gb-sata-3-6gbps-solid-state-hard-drive.html



Should I reinstall my OS onto the SDD?

An infinite number of Monkeys, using an infinite number of typewriters, given an infinite amount of time, will eventually print up Shakespeare's entire works.

#5
Posted 06/09/2011 10:52 PM   
[b]*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?[/b]

Like a standard laptop HDD. 1.4W - 1.8W if I remember...

[b]*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?[/b]

Yes, it uses standard SATA data and power cable. I hope your motherboard support SATA 3 interface...

[b]*Will I notice significant increase in performance?[/b]

You bet! Almost any SSD is faster than two WD Velociraptors in RAID0 config... that's pretty damn fast!

[b]*Does it come with software/drivers?[/b]

Probably, but Windows will fix it (as usual... or not)

[b]*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.[/b]

Searching for the same answer.
*What is the typical power consumption of these devices?



Like a standard laptop HDD. 1.4W - 1.8W if I remember...



*Does it use a regular SATA cable like a hard drive?



Yes, it uses standard SATA data and power cable. I hope your motherboard support SATA 3 interface...



*Will I notice significant increase in performance?



You bet! Almost any SSD is faster than two WD Velociraptors in RAID0 config... that's pretty damn fast!



*Does it come with software/drivers?



Probably, but Windows will fix it (as usual... or not)



*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.



Searching for the same answer.

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#6
Posted 06/09/2011 10:59 PM   
This is an old article but is where I got my basic understanding of SSD lifespans from. Please somebody correct me if things have changed in the few years since this was written. :)

http://www.anandtech.com/show/2829/6
This is an old article but is where I got my basic understanding of SSD lifespans from. Please somebody correct me if things have changed in the few years since this was written. :)



http://www.anandtech.com/show/2829/6

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#7
Posted 06/10/2011 01:22 AM   
"...[i]NAND flash cells have limited write endurance, and much has been made about the potential of solid-state storage to simply stop taking new data after a certain number of program/erase cycles. Although we don't have any way to test for this definitively right now, the hype surrounding write endurance is greater than the actual concern you should have about it. Don't believe us? Take Intel's recent warranty adjustment as an example. Despite transitioning to 25 nm MLC-based flash on its SSD 320 drives, the company increased its warranty coverage from three to five years[/i]..."

[url="http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-performance-tweak,2911.html"]Can You Get More Space Or Speed From Your SSD?
[/url]

"...NAND flash cells have limited write endurance, and much has been made about the potential of solid-state storage to simply stop taking new data after a certain number of program/erase cycles. Although we don't have any way to test for this definitively right now, the hype surrounding write endurance is greater than the actual concern you should have about it. Don't believe us? Take Intel's recent warranty adjustment as an example. Despite transitioning to 25 nm MLC-based flash on its SSD 320 drives, the company increased its warranty coverage from three to five years..."



Can You Get More Space Or Speed From Your SSD?




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#8
Posted 06/10/2011 01:53 AM   
[quote name='RuffeDK' date='09 June 2011 - 10:59 PM' timestamp='1307660373' post='1249865']

[b]*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.[/b]

Searching for the same answer.
[/quote]

Depends on the exact model, but I calculated recently that with an "MLC" drive (higher capacity, slower write speeds, shorter lifespan,) you would need to write to it at maximum speed for about five years continuously to hit the predicted write cycles of the chips. For an SLC drive (lower capacity, faster write speeds, MUCH longer lifespan,) it would be measured in decades. For a conventional computer, you aren't going to be writing 70 MB/s nonstop 24/7 for years on end, so the predicted [url="http://www.ssdforgaming.com/knowing-more-about-ssd-lifespan/"]lifespan[/url] of the chips is much longer. There's a reason Intel's new SLC SSDs are marketed toward datacenter users. Extremely long lifespan, very good reliability. As for reliability, the lack of moving parts should help; all you have to worry about are power issues, and chip death. For a laptop, power issues should be erased, due to the "built-in power isolating UPS" nature of a laptop running off battery.
http://www.ssdforgaming.com/the-benefits-of-laptops-with-ssd/
[quote name='RuffeDK' date='09 June 2011 - 10:59 PM' timestamp='1307660373' post='1249865']



*How long do SSD's last before they die out? I heard that they are much less reliable than hard drives.



Searching for the same answer.





Depends on the exact model, but I calculated recently that with an "MLC" drive (higher capacity, slower write speeds, shorter lifespan,) you would need to write to it at maximum speed for about five years continuously to hit the predicted write cycles of the chips. For an SLC drive (lower capacity, faster write speeds, MUCH longer lifespan,) it would be measured in decades. For a conventional computer, you aren't going to be writing 70 MB/s nonstop 24/7 for years on end, so the predicted lifespan of the chips is much longer. There's a reason Intel's new SLC SSDs are marketed toward datacenter users. Extremely long lifespan, very good reliability. As for reliability, the lack of moving parts should help; all you have to worry about are power issues, and chip death. For a laptop, power issues should be erased, due to the "built-in power isolating UPS" nature of a laptop running off battery.

http://www.ssdforgaming.com/the-benefits-of-laptops-with-ssd/

#9
Posted 02/21/2012 10:02 PM   
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