SOLVED: OVERHEATING of GTX 295 - read it if you struggle with the same! applies to many GTX card
My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.

As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.

I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:

[attachment=19975:dust1.jpg]

[u]Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.[/u]

This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).

After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.

I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.

So OVERHEATING can stem from:

1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and [b]make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air[/b].
2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it
3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air
4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help
5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan

See my [url="https://picasaweb.google.com/jedighost/GTX295ThermalPasteReApplyingAndCoolerCleaning?authkey=Gv1sRgCKT546n4vrr3bw#"][u][b]photo album[/b][/u][/url] of the operation.

SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.

Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.

I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.
My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.



As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.



I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:



[attachment=19975:dust1.jpg]



Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.



This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).



After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.



I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.



So OVERHEATING can stem from:



1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air.

2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it

3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air

4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help

5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan



See my photo album of the operation.



SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.



Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.



I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.
Attachments

dust1.jpg

#1
Posted 02/16/2011 02:59 AM   
Wow thanks! My GTX295 is from March 2009... never cleaned /unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' /> ehm, I use dustfilters /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' />

My card is never getting above 95*C during hours of gaming or benchmarks which is respectable for me since it's overclocked.

But thanks for the tip! I'll definately keep that in mind if I feel like temps growing too hot /turned.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':turned:' />
Wow thanks! My GTX295 is from March 2009... never cleaned /unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' /> ehm, I use dustfilters /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' />



My card is never getting above 95*C during hours of gaming or benchmarks which is respectable for me since it's overclocked.



But thanks for the tip! I'll definately keep that in mind if I feel like temps growing too hot /turned.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':turned:' />

Image
In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010
I'm a ninja. Not a pirate.

#2
Posted 02/17/2011 02:25 AM   
Yeah... Dust that nasty should never be getting inside your case, let alone inside your video card. If anyone else does have this problem, I suggest a better case with dust filters... or cleaning your components once every month or so like most high end gamers probably already do.
Yeah... Dust that nasty should never be getting inside your case, let alone inside your video card. If anyone else does have this problem, I suggest a better case with dust filters... or cleaning your components once every month or so like most high end gamers probably already do.



Image


Image

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#3
Posted 02/17/2011 02:42 AM   
Really nice post, JediGhost!

I retired my BFG GTX 295 last month when I bought GTX 580. I had overheat problems with it as well. I bought it in January-2009 and last summer (after about 1.5 years of never cleaning it), I was getting blue-screens and the card was reaching 100C temperatures.

All I did that time was opened the case, removed the card and used one can of canned air to dust it. I do remember getting some chunks of dust from inside, but nothing major. Anyway, after that operation the temperatures went back to normal.

I am curious, by looking at the pictures (very nicely documented, by the way!) it looked like you do not have a case at all. Is that true? Are you by any chance a smoker? I am just curious how you ended up getting that much gunk in the card. How old is your card? Do you have a lot of dust otherwise in your room?

Again, thanks for your post. Very informative and grats on getting your 295 back into working order!
Really nice post, JediGhost!



I retired my BFG GTX 295 last month when I bought GTX 580. I had overheat problems with it as well. I bought it in January-2009 and last summer (after about 1.5 years of never cleaning it), I was getting blue-screens and the card was reaching 100C temperatures.



All I did that time was opened the case, removed the card and used one can of canned air to dust it. I do remember getting some chunks of dust from inside, but nothing major. Anyway, after that operation the temperatures went back to normal.



I am curious, by looking at the pictures (very nicely documented, by the way!) it looked like you do not have a case at all. Is that true? Are you by any chance a smoker? I am just curious how you ended up getting that much gunk in the card. How old is your card? Do you have a lot of dust otherwise in your room?



Again, thanks for your post. Very informative and grats on getting your 295 back into working order!

#4
Posted 02/17/2011 08:53 PM   
Gilador:

it's a long story but i will keep it short: the 1.5 yrs old card belonged to my brother (normal pc case, but dusty apartment,smoker, card was running 24/7, though not much gaming), who sent it to me, but it would not start upon arrival. I gave it to a repair guy. He had found two bad contacts, he fixed them. He tested the card on that photo where the setup is "naked", reach 107°C, he didnt clean it though /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> , he should have.

It was now starting up, but overheating. The rest you know.

I think the new thermal paste and clean fins made a smaller wonder to the card: it is cool, silent and happily giving tons of FPS !!! /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />
Gilador:



it's a long story but i will keep it short: the 1.5 yrs old card belonged to my brother (normal pc case, but dusty apartment,smoker, card was running 24/7, though not much gaming), who sent it to me, but it would not start upon arrival. I gave it to a repair guy. He had found two bad contacts, he fixed them. He tested the card on that photo where the setup is "naked", reach 107°C, he didnt clean it though /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> , he should have.



It was now starting up, but overheating. The rest you know.



I think the new thermal paste and clean fins made a smaller wonder to the card: it is cool, silent and happily giving tons of FPS !!! /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />

#5
Posted 02/18/2011 04:44 PM   
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks again!

When I had my overheating problems, I decided that I would make it a habit to clean the video card once per year. I think I will stick to that.

Come to think about it, I wonder how my 8800 GTX is... It is in my old PC which I keep running 24/7 as well. It is at least 4 years old and I have never cleaned it. I am planning on putting my GTX 295 in that PC so I will see it then /unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' />
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks again!



When I had my overheating problems, I decided that I would make it a habit to clean the video card once per year. I think I will stick to that.



Come to think about it, I wonder how my 8800 GTX is... It is in my old PC which I keep running 24/7 as well. It is at least 4 years old and I have never cleaned it. I am planning on putting my GTX 295 in that PC so I will see it then /unsure.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':unsure:' />

#6
Posted 02/18/2011 08:43 PM   
I have a BFG GTX 295 also. It over heats all the time and I clean my PC once a month. It could be the card it's self, maybe something to do with when it was manufactured. I'm on my last straw with the GPU. This is not the only game I play, but I'll use this has an example.....I mean really, 105c playing WOW ...... it's W O W, 105c. I do notice if I take it off SLI the temps are perfect... Like I said, I'm on my last straw with this GPU.


HAF Full tower
i7 920
X58
BFG GTX 295
6g ram
1000w psu
win vista 64
I have a BFG GTX 295 also. It over heats all the time and I clean my PC once a month. It could be the card it's self, maybe something to do with when it was manufactured. I'm on my last straw with the GPU. This is not the only game I play, but I'll use this has an example.....I mean really, 105c playing WOW ...... it's W O W, 105c. I do notice if I take it off SLI the temps are perfect... Like I said, I'm on my last straw with this GPU.





HAF Full tower

i7 920

X58

BFG GTX 295

6g ram

1000w psu

win vista 64

Processor: i7 920 @ 3.4

Motherboard: X58

Cooling: Corsair H70

Memory: 12GB Corsair Vengeance triple channel DDR3

Video Card(s): ASUS 570 (x2) SLI

Hard Disk(s): 2t WD black

Optical Drive: LG Blu Ray Burner

Monitor: HP 2408 LCD 24"

Case: Cooler Master HAF 922

Power Supply: Corsair Power 1000W

Software: Win vista x64 home prem

#7
Posted 03/08/2011 08:39 AM   
vectrexevo, I seriously recommend cleaning the card from the inside. NOTHING heats up a GPU more than Furmark, and after full cleaning and reapplying thermal paste, my gtx295 did not go above 90°C.

Please look at the photo album in my first post. You dont have to throw away your card.
vectrexevo, I seriously recommend cleaning the card from the inside. NOTHING heats up a GPU more than Furmark, and after full cleaning and reapplying thermal paste, my gtx295 did not go above 90°C.



Please look at the photo album in my first post. You dont have to throw away your card.

#8
Posted 03/16/2011 11:43 PM   
Good job ! This is exactly why I alway check under the hood. hehe..

If the dust does not get you, bad HSF contact will lol ... [img]http://forums.nvidia.com/public/style_emoticons/default/pirate.gif[/img]
Good job ! This is exactly why I alway check under the hood. hehe..



If the dust does not get you, bad HSF contact will lol ... Image

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#9
Posted 03/17/2011 06:39 AM   
Just registered to reply to this thread.

Ever since I got Battlefield Bad Company 2 at launch time it'd overheat my video card after about an hour of play and cause artifacts, meaning any length of time over an hour was impossible unless I wanted to risk damaging my card. (Less than an hour, actually, as it'd be silly to stick around until the artifacts started to show up.)

Lately, all my games have been causing my video card to become much hotter than it should.

Paying attention to the temperatures, I was getting 67C idling at my desktop with my fan speed at 100%. And that was COOLER than when I had the side of my case on, as I aimed a large desk fan at my video card to try and alleviate some heat. (Not great for dust, but I didn't realize that there WAS dust... ahem, back to the topic at hand.)

This was extremely baffling to me, because I had just used some compress air and a couple Q-tips to clear out my fan, and the heatsink fins all looked nice and clear.

So I did a quick google search, and this thread was the first that popped up. The image you posted of the inside of your card hit home that I was clearly missing something.

I took the thing apart (Which took me a while because I didn't realize there'd be screws underneath ASUS' gigantic decals.) and found the motherlode of all dust. It made your picture look clean. What had to be at LEAST an ounce and a half of dust later (And yuck, a couple dead bugs.) I could see through my fins again! Fast forward a bit (Those SLi cables are tricky to keep connected, but I figured it out.) and it's all reassembled.

Now idling at under 40C with my case's side back on, which alone is a 27C drop.

In Battlefield BC2 after 2 hours of play my card never gets above 66C, which is lower than my previous IDLE temperature.

My BC2 temps prior to this would hit 105C after just 45 minutes of play, which is when I decided to finally look this up.

Thank you for making my computer feel like new again! Just wanted you to know this info did NOT go to waste.
Just registered to reply to this thread.



Ever since I got Battlefield Bad Company 2 at launch time it'd overheat my video card after about an hour of play and cause artifacts, meaning any length of time over an hour was impossible unless I wanted to risk damaging my card. (Less than an hour, actually, as it'd be silly to stick around until the artifacts started to show up.)



Lately, all my games have been causing my video card to become much hotter than it should.



Paying attention to the temperatures, I was getting 67C idling at my desktop with my fan speed at 100%. And that was COOLER than when I had the side of my case on, as I aimed a large desk fan at my video card to try and alleviate some heat. (Not great for dust, but I didn't realize that there WAS dust... ahem, back to the topic at hand.)



This was extremely baffling to me, because I had just used some compress air and a couple Q-tips to clear out my fan, and the heatsink fins all looked nice and clear.



So I did a quick google search, and this thread was the first that popped up. The image you posted of the inside of your card hit home that I was clearly missing something.



I took the thing apart (Which took me a while because I didn't realize there'd be screws underneath ASUS' gigantic decals.) and found the motherlode of all dust. It made your picture look clean. What had to be at LEAST an ounce and a half of dust later (And yuck, a couple dead bugs.) I could see through my fins again! Fast forward a bit (Those SLi cables are tricky to keep connected, but I figured it out.) and it's all reassembled.



Now idling at under 40C with my case's side back on, which alone is a 27C drop.



In Battlefield BC2 after 2 hours of play my card never gets above 66C, which is lower than my previous IDLE temperature.



My BC2 temps prior to this would hit 105C after just 45 minutes of play, which is when I decided to finally look this up.



Thank you for making my computer feel like new again! Just wanted you to know this info did NOT go to waste.

#10
Posted 06/13/2011 04:35 AM   
[quote name='JediGhost' date='15 February 2011 - 07:59 PM' timestamp='1297825191' post='1194249']
My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.

As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.

I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:

[attachment=25927:dust1.jpg]

[u]Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.[/u]

This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).

After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.

I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.

So OVERHEATING can stem from:

1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and [b]make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air[/b].
2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it
3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air
4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help
5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan

See my [url="https://picasaweb.google.com/jedighost/GTX295ThermalPasteReApplyingAndCoolerCleaning?authkey=Gv1sRgCKT546n4vrr3bw#"][u][b]photo album[/b][/u][/url] of the operation.

SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.

Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.

I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.
[/quote]

Thanks for sharing. Do you mind if I use your picture for a knowledge base article? Never seen a graphics card with as much dust before :)
[quote name='JediGhost' date='15 February 2011 - 07:59 PM' timestamp='1297825191' post='1194249']

My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.



As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.



I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:



[attachment=25927:dust1.jpg]



Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.



This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).



After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.



I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.



So OVERHEATING can stem from:



1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air.

2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it

3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air

4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help

5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan



See my photo album of the operation.



SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.



Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.



I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.





Thanks for sharing. Do you mind if I use your picture for a knowledge base article? Never seen a graphics card with as much dust before :)

Please send me a PM if I fail to keep up on replying in any specific thread or leave a driver feedback: Driver Feedback

#11
Posted 06/13/2011 07:08 PM   
[quote name='JediGhost' date='15 February 2011 - 07:59 PM' timestamp='1297825191' post='1194249']
My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.

As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.

I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:

[attachment=25927:dust1.jpg]

[u]Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.[/u]

This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).

After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.

I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.

So OVERHEATING can stem from:

1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and [b]make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air[/b].
2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it
3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air
4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help
5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan

See my [url="https://picasaweb.google.com/jedighost/GTX295ThermalPasteReApplyingAndCoolerCleaning?authkey=Gv1sRgCKT546n4vrr3bw#"][u][b]photo album[/b][/u][/url] of the operation.

SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.

Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.

I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.
[/quote]

Thanks for sharing. Do you mind if I use your picture for a knowledge base article? Never seen a graphics card with as much dust before :)
[quote name='JediGhost' date='15 February 2011 - 07:59 PM' timestamp='1297825191' post='1194249']

My BFG GTX 295 card was at 107°C during gaming. Hot air coming out of it, fan at full speed. Crashes, exiting from 3Dmark, sometimes no restart (red LED), etc., was plaguing me.



As i had no warranty (BFG went bankrupt), i decided to re-apply thermal paste myself. I had never thought what else I did find... Read on.



I was wondering if i should take out the fan, to have a look at the cooling fins, until i managed to peek in and saw a FULLY BAKED RUG of DUST:



[attachment=25927:dust1.jpg]



Such barriers impede airflow so much, that there is no question left to why the card is overheating.



This dust is invisible until you disassemble the GTX 295. If you did not blow the dust out every 6 months from the OPPOSITE flow direction (TOWARDS the fan), then your dust might have solidified and might need strong compressed air and/or electronics contact cleaner to get rid of it (the cleaner is able to dissolve it and then you can blow it out).



After reapplying thermal paste and clearing the way of the airflow, temps dropped 20-30°C!!! Back in normal range. Crysis now has the fan running at 45%, not even loud, and vents warm air, instead of hot air and overheating.



I BET this dust-collecting is a bigger problem than thermal paste getting old, which was actually in good shape. It is invisible, and the tell-tale IS THE overheating.



So OVERHEATING can stem from:



1., dust blocking the way of airflow: CLEAR IT and make sure you don't assume it's clear, until you have seen/checked the whole path of air.

2., old thermal paste (getting rigid and not transferring heat anymore): replace it

3., bad cable and air management in a case: there are guides for this, make sure you videocard can breath in fresh cold air

4., software problems (driver, bios, game): forums help

5., a stopped fan (takes many years of neglect): clean it (if you can) or replace the fan



See my photo album of the operation.



SOOO, TRY strong blows of COMPRESSED AIR, EASILY FOUND AT GAS STATIONS (FOR TIRES) or find a friend with a compressor, just make sure you let the card dry afterwards, as these compressors often blow humid air. You need STRONG bursts, to make sure you cleaned the dust baked onto the fins. This way you can avoid tkaing the card apart and possibly losing the warranty. IF your card overheated, expect lots of dust to come out, in pieces. As long dust is not flying around during the compressed air "treatment", probably the compressed air stream is not strong enough! Now you don't have to overdo it and ruin your card either. Use your common sense.



Notes: the GTX 295 fan has a half-circle shaped 'housing', that is held by 6 screws, 3 on each side of the cooling part of the whole card. Remove these, then the housing. Now you can peek into the fins, and see is there is collected dust. After 1 year, you can expect there to be. Then you have to find 3 more screws that hold the actual fan (see photos), and slide the fan out. Now you have FULL ACCESS to the fins. Clean them. Put fan back. This is for people with some routine, don't do this if you are unexperienced, ask a friend with experience - or the manufacturer. I don't want you to lose your warranty - check with your manufacturer about your options.



I hope this helps, please reply here if it did.





Thanks for sharing. Do you mind if I use your picture for a knowledge base article? Never seen a graphics card with as much dust before :)

Please send me a PM if I fail to keep up on replying in any specific thread or leave a driver feedback: Driver Feedback

#12
Posted 06/13/2011 07:08 PM   
Dude, thanks. Many many thanks. Registered just to tell you that.
My card (xfx gtx295) was 85ºC at idle, 105ºC after some seconds with furmark.
Tried your solution and now it's 52ºC at idle, finishes up 720p furmark 80ºC.

Good job.
Dude, thanks. Many many thanks. Registered just to tell you that.

My card (xfx gtx295) was 85ºC at idle, 105ºC after some seconds with furmark.

Tried your solution and now it's 52ºC at idle, finishes up 720p furmark 80ºC.



Good job.

#13
Posted 10/20/2011 08:35 PM   
hehe lots of people forget about cleaning all the dust out of there computers and that's one of the main causes of computer failures
hehe lots of people forget about cleaning all the dust out of there computers and that's one of the main causes of computer failures

Case Ultra Defender

MotherBoard Asus M4A785-M

AMD Phenom II X2 545 @ 3.5 GHz

3 GB (DDR2 SDRAM) 2x1024 2x512 @ 914 mhz

1 XFX 9600gt 700MHz, 821MHz, 1750 MHz

OCZ gamexstream 600 watt

1 250GB SATA II (7200rpm, 8MB cache)

2 320GB SATA II (7200rpm, 16MB cache)

Windows 7 ULT (32bit)

Acer 22 inch LCD @ 1920x1080

#14
Posted 10/23/2011 09:54 PM   
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