What heat range is acceptable? on GTX 460
Hi, I was playing with EVGA Precision on last night for the first time and while playing Mass Effect 1 on Vista Ultimate 64 I noticed GPU TEMP was around the 50s pretty steady and spiked at 61C. I don't know much about Celsius as Fahrenheit is most common where I live.

It's an EVGA Geforce GTX 460 768 Superclocked.
Using 258.96 drivers as the 260.99 were causing lag in Mass Effect 1 on Vista 64.
EVGA Precison readings:
GPU TEMP: 50s (spike 61C)
GPU Usage: 40s to 50s (spiked at 75% one time)
Memory Usage: 168mb (as high as it got)

Precision is default set to:
GPU Clock: 1500+mhz (can't remember the last 2 digits)
Memory Clock: 1900mhz
Fan: 40%

So with my 460 would those readings be acceptable? Temp and Usage % wise? What temp should I keep it under? There wasn't any hard gaming going on, just conversation between characters. Textures were on High instead of Ultra High and Particles on Low. Vsync is on but not Dynamic Shadows. 1920x1080 resolution. Point filtering was selected instead of Linear or Anistropic.

I remember when I have 2x 8800 GTS 640mb cards and the primary would get to 140F and the secondary 160F.

Just making sure everything's cool :)
Hi, I was playing with EVGA Precision on last night for the first time and while playing Mass Effect 1 on Vista Ultimate 64 I noticed GPU TEMP was around the 50s pretty steady and spiked at 61C. I don't know much about Celsius as Fahrenheit is most common where I live.



It's an EVGA Geforce GTX 460 768 Superclocked.

Using 258.96 drivers as the 260.99 were causing lag in Mass Effect 1 on Vista 64.

EVGA Precison readings:

GPU TEMP: 50s (spike 61C)

GPU Usage: 40s to 50s (spiked at 75% one time)

Memory Usage: 168mb (as high as it got)



Precision is default set to:

GPU Clock: 1500+mhz (can't remember the last 2 digits)

Memory Clock: 1900mhz

Fan: 40%



So with my 460 would those readings be acceptable? Temp and Usage % wise? What temp should I keep it under? There wasn't any hard gaming going on, just conversation between characters. Textures were on High instead of Ultra High and Particles on Low. Vsync is on but not Dynamic Shadows. 1920x1080 resolution. Point filtering was selected instead of Linear or Anistropic.



I remember when I have 2x 8800 GTS 640mb cards and the primary would get to 140F and the secondary 160F.



Just making sure everything's cool :)

BFG 680i chipset

Intel 3.33ghz core2duo 1333fsb Wolfdale

8gb OCZ 800mhz SLI-Ready RAM

EVGA Geforce GTX 460 768mb SC

Audio through HDMI on vid card

3 HDD (1 w/XP 32-bit Home Edition, 1 w/Vista Ultimate 64-bit, 1 w/Win7 Ultimate 64-bit)

52" Sony Bravia LCD HDTV 1080p

Logitech MX5500 Revolution Keyboard & Mouse (bluetooth)

#1
Posted 12/21/2010 09:22 PM   
That's very normal for the GTX 460 and is considered very cool actually. According to Nvidia the GTX 460 can handle up to 105C, and previous Fermi cards (GTX 470/480) can go up to the high 80s and even the low 90s under load using normal fan profile. The GTX 460 is a cool-running card even without a custom fan profile.
That's very normal for the GTX 460 and is considered very cool actually. According to Nvidia the GTX 460 can handle up to 105C, and previous Fermi cards (GTX 470/480) can go up to the high 80s and even the low 90s under load using normal fan profile. The GTX 460 is a cool-running card even without a custom fan profile.

CPU: Intel Core i5-2550K @4.4GHz
Mainboard: MSI Z77A-GD43 (Intel Z77 chipset)
Graphics: MSI N660Ti PE 2GD5/OC (GeForce GTX 660 Ti @1019MHz)
RAM: 2 x 4GB Visipro PC3-12800 (1.5V @933MHz)
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit Service Pack 1
PSU: Seasonic Eco 600W SS-600BT Active PFC T3
Monitor: Asus VX239H (23" Full HD AH-IPS LED Display)

#2
Posted 12/22/2010 01:58 AM   
Mine idles around 35-36C then goes to around ~60C. Thats actually very cool considering I'm in a tropical country. /teehee.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':teehee:' />
Mine idles around 35-36C then goes to around ~60C. Thats actually very cool considering I'm in a tropical country. /teehee.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':teehee:' />

Currently playing: BF3 - DotA 2

CPU Phenom II X4 965 - 3.6ghz

RAMS Team Xtreem Dark DDR2 1066 4GB

Mobo Asrock 780gm-le

Graphics GTX 460 1GB

Monitor 22" Samsung LCD 1920x1080

PSU Antec TruePower New 750W

Case NZXT Gamma

KMS Logitech G15v1, A4tech x7 XL-747H



9800xt - 2600xt - hd3870 - hd4850 - gtx460(768mb) - gtx570 - gts450 - gtx460(1gb)



Image

#3
Posted 12/22/2010 04:42 AM   
Thanks for the input everyone. I played Mass Effect 1 all day yesterday (was a day off) and even in combat the readings never got above what I said in the original post. Makes me feel good knowing this now.
Thanks for the input everyone. I played Mass Effect 1 all day yesterday (was a day off) and even in combat the readings never got above what I said in the original post. Makes me feel good knowing this now.

BFG 680i chipset

Intel 3.33ghz core2duo 1333fsb Wolfdale

8gb OCZ 800mhz SLI-Ready RAM

EVGA Geforce GTX 460 768mb SC

Audio through HDMI on vid card

3 HDD (1 w/XP 32-bit Home Edition, 1 w/Vista Ultimate 64-bit, 1 w/Win7 Ultimate 64-bit)

52" Sony Bravia LCD HDTV 1080p

Logitech MX5500 Revolution Keyboard & Mouse (bluetooth)

#4
Posted 12/23/2010 02:09 PM   
It's utterly terrifying seeing my GPU temp go up to ~90C ingame. I'm on a GTX 470, is this even remotely close to being okay?
It's utterly terrifying seeing my GPU temp go up to ~90C ingame. I'm on a GTX 470, is this even remotely close to being okay?

#5
Posted 12/24/2010 05:19 AM   
Nvidia has officially said that temps in the 90s is still okay for the GTX 470/480 and that they have been designed to withstand the heat, but constantly running near the temperature of boiling water is never good for electronic components. My belief is that anything over 80 is too hot for electronic components and will shorten its lifespan significantly. Make sure your case has proper ventilation with no cables blocking the air flow. You may want to add a case fan if there's still room. You can also create a custom fan profile so that the fan will spin faster than the default speeds as the temperature rises. Use MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision to do so.
Nvidia has officially said that temps in the 90s is still okay for the GTX 470/480 and that they have been designed to withstand the heat, but constantly running near the temperature of boiling water is never good for electronic components. My belief is that anything over 80 is too hot for electronic components and will shorten its lifespan significantly. Make sure your case has proper ventilation with no cables blocking the air flow. You may want to add a case fan if there's still room. You can also create a custom fan profile so that the fan will spin faster than the default speeds as the temperature rises. Use MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision to do so.

CPU: Intel Core i5-2550K @4.4GHz
Mainboard: MSI Z77A-GD43 (Intel Z77 chipset)
Graphics: MSI N660Ti PE 2GD5/OC (GeForce GTX 660 Ti @1019MHz)
RAM: 2 x 4GB Visipro PC3-12800 (1.5V @933MHz)
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit Service Pack 1
PSU: Seasonic Eco 600W SS-600BT Active PFC T3
Monitor: Asus VX239H (23" Full HD AH-IPS LED Display)

#6
Posted 12/24/2010 10:42 AM   
[quote name='Ital' date='24 December 2010 - 10:42 AM' timestamp='1293187368' post='1165730']
Nvidia has officially said that temps in the 90s is still okay for the GTX 470/480 and that they have been designed to withstand the heat, but constantly running near the temperature of boiling water is never good for electronic components. My belief is that anything over 80 is too hot for electronic components and will shorten its lifespan significantly. Make sure your case has proper ventilation with no cables blocking the air flow. You may want to add a case fan if there's still room. You can also create a custom fan profile so that the fan will spin faster than the default speeds as the temperature rises. Use MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision to do so.
[/quote]

Hi Ital,

If that is the case, would you say that my 2x GTX 480 are at risk of a reduced lifetime?

While playing games, the temperature of the cards can reach 86 degrees Celsius. However, after I have finished gaming, the temperatures after only 60 seconds fall to 69 degrees Celsius.

My case fans are set up as follows:

1x 12 cm front intake fan
3x side (of the case) 12 cm intakes fans
1x rear 12cm exhaust fan
1x top (of the case) exhaust fan
1x Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 Heat sink and fan
2x Stock Geforce GTX 480 Heatsinks and fans
1x 13.5 cm Power Supply fan (Coolermaster Real Power M1000 CMAST RS-A00-ESBA Power Supply)

If I am not gaming, the temperatures are usually 55 degrees Celsius. While the advice of installing cases fans is really good advice, however I have already done that (please refer to the picture of my PC below) and still temperatures can still reach the mid 80’s (but then stay there). My point being that even with a lot of cooling installed, temperatures can still get quite high.

[img]http://i742.photobucket.com/albums/xx69/Jimboc/InsideView-1.jpg[/img]

If I have set up my case fan configuration wrong, I would appreciate any advice on how to correct and improve it (i.e. which fans should blow air in and which suck air out) /thanks.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thanks:' /> . This will also help others trying to reduce the temperatures of their GPU.

I am not too worried about my cards. They were designed to reach 95 degrees Celsius while gaming and have a limit of 105 degrees Celsius. Mine only ever reach 86 degrees Celsius. They used to reach 89 but my new CPU heatsink and fan have lowered this.

I use EVGA Precision 2.0.1 to measure temperatures.

@nightwolf613:

Well done on building a system that runs so cool /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> . I wish you good luck with it and enjoy./woot.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':woot:' />

Merry Christmas everyone.

Jimboc
[quote name='Ital' date='24 December 2010 - 10:42 AM' timestamp='1293187368' post='1165730']

Nvidia has officially said that temps in the 90s is still okay for the GTX 470/480 and that they have been designed to withstand the heat, but constantly running near the temperature of boiling water is never good for electronic components. My belief is that anything over 80 is too hot for electronic components and will shorten its lifespan significantly. Make sure your case has proper ventilation with no cables blocking the air flow. You may want to add a case fan if there's still room. You can also create a custom fan profile so that the fan will spin faster than the default speeds as the temperature rises. Use MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision to do so.





Hi Ital,



If that is the case, would you say that my 2x GTX 480 are at risk of a reduced lifetime?



While playing games, the temperature of the cards can reach 86 degrees Celsius. However, after I have finished gaming, the temperatures after only 60 seconds fall to 69 degrees Celsius.



My case fans are set up as follows:



1x 12 cm front intake fan

3x side (of the case) 12 cm intakes fans

1x rear 12cm exhaust fan

1x top (of the case) exhaust fan

1x Arctic Cooling Freezer 13 Heat sink and fan

2x Stock Geforce GTX 480 Heatsinks and fans

1x 13.5 cm Power Supply fan (Coolermaster Real Power M1000 CMAST RS-A00-ESBA Power Supply)



If I am not gaming, the temperatures are usually 55 degrees Celsius. While the advice of installing cases fans is really good advice, however I have already done that (please refer to the picture of my PC below) and still temperatures can still reach the mid 80’s (but then stay there). My point being that even with a lot of cooling installed, temperatures can still get quite high.



Image



If I have set up my case fan configuration wrong, I would appreciate any advice on how to correct and improve it (i.e. which fans should blow air in and which suck air out) /thanks.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thanks:' /> . This will also help others trying to reduce the temperatures of their GPU.



I am not too worried about my cards. They were designed to reach 95 degrees Celsius while gaming and have a limit of 105 degrees Celsius. Mine only ever reach 86 degrees Celsius. They used to reach 89 but my new CPU heatsink and fan have lowered this.



I use EVGA Precision 2.0.1 to measure temperatures.



@nightwolf613:



Well done on building a system that runs so cool /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> . I wish you good luck with it and enjoy./woot.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':woot:' />



Merry Christmas everyone.



Jimboc

Useful GPU Temperature Monitoring Guide , The Unofficial NVIDIA SLI Technology User Reference Guide , Nvidia Multi GPU SLI/PhysX Setup Guide , NVLDDMKM Problems (Very Helpful Thread), How To Choose The Correct Power Supply

Image

Help fight Cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease etc. by donating unused CPU and GPU power to Stanford Universities' Research projects
Simplest method is to setup the FAH v7 client with these guides (Team Number: 142900)

Intel Core i7 2600K @ 3.4 GHz | 16GB Corsair Vengeance PC3-12800 | Asus P8P67 Pro Rev 3.0 | 1x 6GB EVGA Geforce GTX Titan (836 Mhz Base, 876 Mhz Boost) | Corsair HX1000 PSU | Creative X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Pro | Dell U2711 LCD | Windows 8.1 Pro 64 Bit


You have to be "totally up for it" and motivated otherwise you just wouldn't win. - Jessica Ennis-Hill

#7
Posted 12/24/2010 05:39 PM   
Jimboc, I think you've done all you can in getting your dual GTX 480 cards physically cool with air cooling. It's possible to replace the stock coolers with better aftermarket coolers, but liquid cooling is really the only way to get those cards running significantly cooler during heavy load. Those cards can't help but run hot due to the first generation Fermi GPU's brute force design and half-assed stock cooling solution. Nvidia realized this and came up with the much better vapor chamber cooling solution for their new GTX 500 series cards. In any case, mid 80's is not so bad and would probably only shave off a few months from the card's total lifespan. If you change your cards every 2 years or so then it shouldn't affect you, although I'd feel sorry for whoever gets those cards afterwards. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />

Have you tried using software to create custom fan profiles for your cards? The downside is that fan noise will go through the roof (or computer case in this matter) and may be quite annoying. Between those 2 GTX 480 cards, I imagine your computer will sound like a jet plane taking off if you crank up the fan speed on the cards. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />

As for proper air flow inside your case, I think the only rule to follow is that hot air should leave out the back of the case. That means fans on the back of the case should be blowing outwards whereas all the other fans should be blowing inwards. Since hot air is leaving out the back, make sure there's plenty of space around the back of your computer so that the hot air doesn't get sucked back in and recirculated inside the case.
Jimboc, I think you've done all you can in getting your dual GTX 480 cards physically cool with air cooling. It's possible to replace the stock coolers with better aftermarket coolers, but liquid cooling is really the only way to get those cards running significantly cooler during heavy load. Those cards can't help but run hot due to the first generation Fermi GPU's brute force design and half-assed stock cooling solution. Nvidia realized this and came up with the much better vapor chamber cooling solution for their new GTX 500 series cards. In any case, mid 80's is not so bad and would probably only shave off a few months from the card's total lifespan. If you change your cards every 2 years or so then it shouldn't affect you, although I'd feel sorry for whoever gets those cards afterwards. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />



Have you tried using software to create custom fan profiles for your cards? The downside is that fan noise will go through the roof (or computer case in this matter) and may be quite annoying. Between those 2 GTX 480 cards, I imagine your computer will sound like a jet plane taking off if you crank up the fan speed on the cards. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />



As for proper air flow inside your case, I think the only rule to follow is that hot air should leave out the back of the case. That means fans on the back of the case should be blowing outwards whereas all the other fans should be blowing inwards. Since hot air is leaving out the back, make sure there's plenty of space around the back of your computer so that the hot air doesn't get sucked back in and recirculated inside the case.

CPU: Intel Core i5-2550K @4.4GHz
Mainboard: MSI Z77A-GD43 (Intel Z77 chipset)
Graphics: MSI N660Ti PE 2GD5/OC (GeForce GTX 660 Ti @1019MHz)
RAM: 2 x 4GB Visipro PC3-12800 (1.5V @933MHz)
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit Service Pack 1
PSU: Seasonic Eco 600W SS-600BT Active PFC T3
Monitor: Asus VX239H (23" Full HD AH-IPS LED Display)

#8
Posted 12/25/2010 03:37 AM   
Been folding on 2 9800GTX's for 2 years, 24/7, both cards would run in the mid/high 80's for days at end in the summer and they are still going.
As long as you stay under ~90C with your cards when using them 24/7 like me, your fine.
I see that it goes up under gaming, so you'll have to pause now and then ( I hope/think ) and if you hit the mid 90'sC once in a while its no problem.
If it runs in the 90'sC for extended timeperiods, I would go for a different cooling solution.
Been folding on 2 9800GTX's for 2 years, 24/7, both cards would run in the mid/high 80's for days at end in the summer and they are still going.

As long as you stay under ~90C with your cards when using them 24/7 like me, your fine.

I see that it goes up under gaming, so you'll have to pause now and then ( I hope/think ) and if you hit the mid 90'sC once in a while its no problem.

If it runs in the 90'sC for extended timeperiods, I would go for a different cooling solution.

#9
Posted 12/25/2010 12:25 PM   
Hi Ital,

I realise that after market cooling can reduce the temperature of such cards, solutions such Arctic Cooling Accelero Xtreme Plus are great (as you can probably tell I am supporter of theirs, I really like their products):

[url="http://www.arctic.ac/en/p/cooling/vga/18/accelero-xtreme-plus.html?c=2182"]http://www.arctic.ac/en/p/cooling/vga/18/accelero-xtreme-plus.html?c=2182[/url]

However I decided not to go for these for my cards since installing them on my cards would void the manufacturers 3 year warranty. I chose not to use water cooling for the same reason.

As for giving them to someone else after I have used them, I usually give older components to anyone who wants them for free. If something goes wrong, nothing is lost since they get them for free. This has always worked for me for years and the components I give away never have a thing wrong with them.

I could use EVGA Precision (I have version 2.0.1 installed) to raise the fan speed while playing games but I haven’t done this so far. I will consider doing this in the very near future and see how it works out.

As for the noise, there is already quite a lot of noise from the fans but I actually like to hear that, it is reassuring. I think hearing such powerful fans is awesome especially since they spin faster almost immediately on loading up a game /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' /> . Yes they do sound like a jet engine but I don’t mind.

I already have all of the fans on the back case of the case blowing air out the back of the case. All other fans blow air into the case. At the back of the case, all free PCI blanking plates have been replaced with blanking plates that have vent holes cut into them (these were purchased separately). They are the same type that are already attached to the graphics cards themselves hence the need of each card to occupy 2 PCI slots instead of 1.

My case sits quite a distance from the wall and I also have a ventilation fan in the wall behind the computer to remove the very large volume of air that used to build up (even with the distance of the case from the wall). This air used to be so hot that putting your hand between the computer and the wall used to cause you to pull your hand away, it was that hot! The newly installed ventilation fan has completely resolved this.

The problem of the air being re-circulated used to occur before I installed the wall fan. However the temperatures of the GPUs were only then a degree or 2 higher. As I said, this problem no longer occurs.

As I also mentioned that once I stop playing a game, the temperatures of the cards fall from the mid 80s to 69 degrees Celsius within 60 seconds of quitting the game.

I play games for about 1 - 3 hours a day and for the rest of the day, the cards idle at 55 degrees Celsius or lower. So the cards temperature isn't always high.

@DaLoona:

I agree, you are right. My cards stay in the mid 80s to low 80s while gaming. They never reach 90 degrees no matter how long I play games.

So as you said, there should not be a problem.

Thanks for telling me about your cards, it is very reassuring to know that your cards have been running at that temperature for that length of time and have not had any issues. It has made me a lot more confident in my own cards.

Thanks to both of you for the advice, I really appreciate it. /thanks.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thanks:' />

I wish you both a Happy New Year. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />

Jimboc
Hi Ital,



I realise that after market cooling can reduce the temperature of such cards, solutions such Arctic Cooling Accelero Xtreme Plus are great (as you can probably tell I am supporter of theirs, I really like their products):



http://www.arctic.ac/en/p/cooling/vga/18/accelero-xtreme-plus.html?c=2182



However I decided not to go for these for my cards since installing them on my cards would void the manufacturers 3 year warranty. I chose not to use water cooling for the same reason.



As for giving them to someone else after I have used them, I usually give older components to anyone who wants them for free. If something goes wrong, nothing is lost since they get them for free. This has always worked for me for years and the components I give away never have a thing wrong with them.



I could use EVGA Precision (I have version 2.0.1 installed) to raise the fan speed while playing games but I haven’t done this so far. I will consider doing this in the very near future and see how it works out.



As for the noise, there is already quite a lot of noise from the fans but I actually like to hear that, it is reassuring. I think hearing such powerful fans is awesome especially since they spin faster almost immediately on loading up a game /biggrin.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':biggrin:' /> . Yes they do sound like a jet engine but I don’t mind.



I already have all of the fans on the back case of the case blowing air out the back of the case. All other fans blow air into the case. At the back of the case, all free PCI blanking plates have been replaced with blanking plates that have vent holes cut into them (these were purchased separately). They are the same type that are already attached to the graphics cards themselves hence the need of each card to occupy 2 PCI slots instead of 1.



My case sits quite a distance from the wall and I also have a ventilation fan in the wall behind the computer to remove the very large volume of air that used to build up (even with the distance of the case from the wall). This air used to be so hot that putting your hand between the computer and the wall used to cause you to pull your hand away, it was that hot! The newly installed ventilation fan has completely resolved this.



The problem of the air being re-circulated used to occur before I installed the wall fan. However the temperatures of the GPUs were only then a degree or 2 higher. As I said, this problem no longer occurs.



As I also mentioned that once I stop playing a game, the temperatures of the cards fall from the mid 80s to 69 degrees Celsius within 60 seconds of quitting the game.



I play games for about 1 - 3 hours a day and for the rest of the day, the cards idle at 55 degrees Celsius or lower. So the cards temperature isn't always high.



@DaLoona:



I agree, you are right. My cards stay in the mid 80s to low 80s while gaming. They never reach 90 degrees no matter how long I play games.



So as you said, there should not be a problem.



Thanks for telling me about your cards, it is very reassuring to know that your cards have been running at that temperature for that length of time and have not had any issues. It has made me a lot more confident in my own cards.



Thanks to both of you for the advice, I really appreciate it. /thanks.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thanks:' />



I wish you both a Happy New Year. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />



Jimboc

Useful GPU Temperature Monitoring Guide , The Unofficial NVIDIA SLI Technology User Reference Guide , Nvidia Multi GPU SLI/PhysX Setup Guide , NVLDDMKM Problems (Very Helpful Thread), How To Choose The Correct Power Supply

Image

Help fight Cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease etc. by donating unused CPU and GPU power to Stanford Universities' Research projects
Simplest method is to setup the FAH v7 client with these guides (Team Number: 142900)

Intel Core i7 2600K @ 3.4 GHz | 16GB Corsair Vengeance PC3-12800 | Asus P8P67 Pro Rev 3.0 | 1x 6GB EVGA Geforce GTX Titan (836 Mhz Base, 876 Mhz Boost) | Corsair HX1000 PSU | Creative X-Fi Titanium Fatal1ty Pro | Dell U2711 LCD | Windows 8.1 Pro 64 Bit


You have to be "totally up for it" and motivated otherwise you just wouldn't win. - Jessica Ennis-Hill

#10
Posted 12/25/2010 08:12 PM   
[quote name='Jimboc' date='24 December 2010 - 12:39 PM' timestamp='1293212388' post='1165816']


@nightwolf613:

Well done on building a system that runs so cool /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> . I wish you good luck with it and enjoy./woot.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':woot:' />

Merry Christmas everyone.

Jimboc
[/quote]
Thanks. I built it like 4 years ago. Time flies and it is hard to remember but the 8800 GTX cards were new then, and I built mine with dual 8800 GTS 640mb cards as they better fit my budget.
The system has the airflow all going one way with only one exhaust point using a 120mm turbine.
Three 120mm turbines pulling air into the left side and on to the components. Was four but I had to remove one to make room for my Zalman CPU Heatsink.
One 120mm turbine pulling air in the front across the HDDs and another at the top forcing air down pass the PSU cables and RAM.
The Zalman I have is solid copper using a figure 8 type coil at the base and expanding into a huge ring of sharp blades that make up the rest of the heatsink. A 130mm fan pushes air through the copper and out back of the case which is in-line with the exhaust turbine, thus making all air current moving in one direction on the way out.
My CPU has never gotten above 104F degrees even after playing games all day. I used Arctic #5 thermal paste on it as well.
Cooling systems on the video cards now and then came with the card, so no aftermarket yet. I wouldn't unless I felt it was needed. Zalman makes them as well but I haven't had a need for one yet.
[quote name='Jimboc' date='24 December 2010 - 12:39 PM' timestamp='1293212388' post='1165816']





@nightwolf613:



Well done on building a system that runs so cool /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> . I wish you good luck with it and enjoy./woot.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':woot:' />



Merry Christmas everyone.



Jimboc



Thanks. I built it like 4 years ago. Time flies and it is hard to remember but the 8800 GTX cards were new then, and I built mine with dual 8800 GTS 640mb cards as they better fit my budget.

The system has the airflow all going one way with only one exhaust point using a 120mm turbine.

Three 120mm turbines pulling air into the left side and on to the components. Was four but I had to remove one to make room for my Zalman CPU Heatsink.

One 120mm turbine pulling air in the front across the HDDs and another at the top forcing air down pass the PSU cables and RAM.

The Zalman I have is solid copper using a figure 8 type coil at the base and expanding into a huge ring of sharp blades that make up the rest of the heatsink. A 130mm fan pushes air through the copper and out back of the case which is in-line with the exhaust turbine, thus making all air current moving in one direction on the way out.

My CPU has never gotten above 104F degrees even after playing games all day. I used Arctic #5 thermal paste on it as well.

Cooling systems on the video cards now and then came with the card, so no aftermarket yet. I wouldn't unless I felt it was needed. Zalman makes them as well but I haven't had a need for one yet.

BFG 680i chipset

Intel 3.33ghz core2duo 1333fsb Wolfdale

8gb OCZ 800mhz SLI-Ready RAM

EVGA Geforce GTX 460 768mb SC

Audio through HDMI on vid card

3 HDD (1 w/XP 32-bit Home Edition, 1 w/Vista Ultimate 64-bit, 1 w/Win7 Ultimate 64-bit)

52" Sony Bravia LCD HDTV 1080p

Logitech MX5500 Revolution Keyboard & Mouse (bluetooth)

#11
Posted 12/28/2010 06:19 PM   
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