Linux and Hybrid Graphics no Optimus support, sad but true, but...
  1 / 4    
Yes, I know. NVidia stated that there will be no support for Optimus. That's very sad- but from what I read technically understandable. What I'm wondering is- why does NVidia denies support to use the card at all?

Yes, on some Laptops it is switchable via bios, but as far as I know most Laptops don't support that- mine as well.

As a Linux user I got used to be always a 2nd class user regarding support, but that now is really a shame. When I bought this Laptop I was already aware about Optimus not working on Linux and I didn't expect it to be usable in the future, but I was not aware about not being able to use the NVidia card at all because of that- is it really so difficult to make the card at least working?
I've read already a lot about the technical details and problems with the sharing of the Intel cards, but I think it would be still quite easy for such a big company and development staff to create a driver to use it.

If I'd be able to run the card, I'd be happy already. I don't need to switch on runtime and I'm having no problem with battery lifetime- currently the card is consuming power anyway even although I'm not able to use it at all. I really think its not asked to much being able to use it.

Yes, now I'm waiting for some answer like: "We never said it would work" or "You should have checked more carefully before buying it" - but the truth is, most ATI based Laptops are also using AMD chipset and CPU which are currently rather weak compared to current Intel I3/I5/I7 series. So if i want a powerful Laptop I have to accept that I have some great high end graphics card which is only consuming power and reducing the lifetime of my battery- but I need the power and so the decision would be still the same for me to buy this Laptop.

I got the impression that NVidia is probably having already to many consumers buying their products and that it doesn't matter if they sell a few thousand GPU's less, the Linux user is obviously not worth supporting.
Yes, I know. NVidia stated that there will be no support for Optimus. That's very sad- but from what I read technically understandable. What I'm wondering is- why does NVidia denies support to use the card at all?



Yes, on some Laptops it is switchable via bios, but as far as I know most Laptops don't support that- mine as well.



As a Linux user I got used to be always a 2nd class user regarding support, but that now is really a shame. When I bought this Laptop I was already aware about Optimus not working on Linux and I didn't expect it to be usable in the future, but I was not aware about not being able to use the NVidia card at all because of that- is it really so difficult to make the card at least working?

I've read already a lot about the technical details and problems with the sharing of the Intel cards, but I think it would be still quite easy for such a big company and development staff to create a driver to use it.



If I'd be able to run the card, I'd be happy already. I don't need to switch on runtime and I'm having no problem with battery lifetime- currently the card is consuming power anyway even although I'm not able to use it at all. I really think its not asked to much being able to use it.



Yes, now I'm waiting for some answer like: "We never said it would work" or "You should have checked more carefully before buying it" - but the truth is, most ATI based Laptops are also using AMD chipset and CPU which are currently rather weak compared to current Intel I3/I5/I7 series. So if i want a powerful Laptop I have to accept that I have some great high end graphics card which is only consuming power and reducing the lifetime of my battery- but I need the power and so the decision would be still the same for me to buy this Laptop.



I got the impression that NVidia is probably having already to many consumers buying their products and that it doesn't matter if they sell a few thousand GPU's less, the Linux user is obviously not worth supporting.

#1
Posted 12/15/2010 05:16 PM   
You right. Some days ago I couldn't imagine a big and serious company would ignore its hardware users. In fact, i paid for nvidia card in my laptop and i can't use it. It looks like i bought a junk at the price of an 3d-accelerator.

Sorry for my English.
You right. Some days ago I couldn't imagine a big and serious company would ignore its hardware users. In fact, i paid for nvidia card in my laptop and i can't use it. It looks like i bought a junk at the price of an 3d-accelerator.



Sorry for my English.

#2
Posted 12/16/2010 03:24 PM   
Optimus works because of features built into Windows 7 (Note: it wont work on Vista either). Until something similar is implemented in Linux, Optimus will not be able to work.
For the vast majority of Optimus notebooks there is no hardware connection between the Nvidia GPU and the display, Optimus works primarily through software.

So I wouldn't say that Nvidia is ignoring Optimus users on Linux, its just that it is going to take a lot more than just a driver for Optimus to work. There is something called VGASwitheroo that is being worked on that will be the base for switchable graphics in Linux but support for something like Optimus is way, way off AFAIK.
Optimus works because of features built into Windows 7 (Note: it wont work on Vista either). Until something similar is implemented in Linux, Optimus will not be able to work.

For the vast majority of Optimus notebooks there is no hardware connection between the Nvidia GPU and the display, Optimus works primarily through software.



So I wouldn't say that Nvidia is ignoring Optimus users on Linux, its just that it is going to take a lot more than just a driver for Optimus to work. There is something called VGASwitheroo that is being worked on that will be the base for switchable graphics in Linux but support for something like Optimus is way, way off AFAIK.

#3
Posted 12/18/2010 09:57 PM   
Allow me to chime in and sorry for Hijacking but this is related i believe.

So just received an Asus N43J notebook with the Optimus Intel/Nvidia GT425m
I researched and noticed that Linux doesn't support optimus, which was fine as i could care less about battery life, but what i failed to find out, and after extensive searching now know, is that apparently I can't use the Nvidia card AT ALL!!! Not happy.

My BIOS does not support toggle/enable/disable integrated/discreet graphics. So, now I'm left with a problem.

Has anyone been able to disable the onboard intel video and use the Nvidia one, using the OS? My *nix-fu isn't up to figuring this one out solo, as i've never run into this before. Is there a way for me to ONLY use the Nvidia card? Being tied to Windblows just to use my new VC plain sucks.

I've already tried
[color="#00FF00"][code]sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-current-modaliases nvidia-settings[/code][/color]


SPECS:
ASUS N43J 14"
dual boot Win7 & Ubuntu 10.10 x64 2.6.35-23-generic
Intel Core i5
4GB RAM
Intel integrated graphics (using i915)
Nvidia GT425m Dedicated Graphics (latest 260.19.29 Certified)
Latest BIOS for motherboard 260 (still no option for graphics toggle)
Allow me to chime in and sorry for Hijacking but this is related i believe.



So just received an Asus N43J notebook with the Optimus Intel/Nvidia GT425m

I researched and noticed that Linux doesn't support optimus, which was fine as i could care less about battery life, but what i failed to find out, and after extensive searching now know, is that apparently I can't use the Nvidia card AT ALL!!! Not happy.



My BIOS does not support toggle/enable/disable integrated/discreet graphics. So, now I'm left with a problem.



Has anyone been able to disable the onboard intel video and use the Nvidia one, using the OS? My *nix-fu isn't up to figuring this one out solo, as i've never run into this before. Is there a way for me to ONLY use the Nvidia card? Being tied to Windblows just to use my new VC plain sucks.



I've already tried

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ubuntu-x-swat/x-updates

sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install nvidia-current nvidia-current-modaliases nvidia-settings






SPECS:

ASUS N43J 14"

dual boot Win7 & Ubuntu 10.10 x64 2.6.35-23-generic

Intel Core i5

4GB RAM

Intel integrated graphics (using i915)

Nvidia GT425m Dedicated Graphics (latest 260.19.29 Certified)

Latest BIOS for motherboard 260 (still no option for graphics toggle)

#4
Posted 12/19/2010 11:36 PM   
Signed, I am still secretly hoping for a christmas gift from Nvidia making it work :)
I am an ASUS n61jv user with gt350M dedicated card, and while I was aware of Optimus not working on Linux, while buying the laptop, I really hoped it would be the same case as with ATI cards in their hybrid laptops. Now, are all the Linux laptop users going to have to buy ATI-powered laptop so that they can have a laptop they had paid for ? It's a slap.
Signed, I am still secretly hoping for a christmas gift from Nvidia making it work :)

I am an ASUS n61jv user with gt350M dedicated card, and while I was aware of Optimus not working on Linux, while buying the laptop, I really hoped it would be the same case as with ATI cards in their hybrid laptops. Now, are all the Linux laptop users going to have to buy ATI-powered laptop so that they can have a laptop they had paid for ? It's a slap.

#5
Posted 12/20/2010 09:19 AM   
I have explained above why this won't happen with Linux. I suggest reading the [url="http://www.nvidia.com/object/LO_optimus_whitepapers.html"]Optimus Whitepaper[/url] for more info. It is important to note that Optimus is not like the traditional way of doing switchable graphics.

Terms to understand first:
IGP = Intel GPU
Discrete GPU = Nvidia GPU
Multiplexer or MUX = Switch

Here are some selective quotes from it that illustrate what I am talking about: (Note: Quote blocks are all from the Optimus Whitepaper.)
[quote][b]Optimus technology leverages Windows 7‟s ability to allow two independent graphics drivers to be active at the same time.[/b][/quote]

[quote]The beauty of Optimus is that it leverages standard industry protocols and APIs to work. From relying on [b]standard Microsoft APIs[/b] when communicating with the Intel IGP driver, to utilizing the PCI-Express bus to transfer the GPU‟s output to the Intel IGP, there are no proprietary hoops to jump through. NVIDIA‟s new hardware and software design seamlessly blends into the existing frameworks.[/quote]


[quote][b]One of the primary advantages of Optimus compared to Switchable Graphics is that it does not need additional hardware like multiplexers.[/b] An Optimus implementation‟s simplicity reduces
costs, eases design and verification effort, and speeds time to market. As noted earlier, [b]all display connections are made directly to the IGP. Regardless of which display adapter is
processing the workload, the IGP will push the output to the display.[/b][/quote]

The above quote is key to what makes Optimus different from traditional switchable graphics. With traditional switchable graphics there is a physical display switch between GPUs. This is why the screen blanks for a second or two when switching. With Optimus there is no direct connection to the display for the Nvidia GPU. So turning off the Intel GPU would essentially result no Nvidia GPU display.

The easiest way to think about it is like this:

Traditional Switchable Graphics:
If you are using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Digital Switch (multiplexer) that determines which GPU to output to the display -> Notebook LCD
If you are using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Digital Switch (multiplexer) that determines which GPU to output to the display -> Notebook LCD
The Multiplexer is the switch in switchable graphics. Think of it sort of like a light switch.

Optimus Technology:
If it is using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD
If it is using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD
The term "switchable graphics" doesn't really apply to Optimus IMHO because there is no real switch (multiplexer) like there is with traditional switchable graphics.

Or as it is put in the whitepaper: [quote]When the (Nvidia) GPU can provide an increase in performance, functionality, or quality over the IGP for an application, the NVIDIA driver will enable the (Nvidia) GPU. When the user launches an application, the NVIDIA driver will recognize whether the application being run can benefit from using the (Nvidia) GPU. If the application can benefit from running on the (Nvidia) GPU, the (Nvidia) GPU is powered up from an idle state and is given all rendering calls. Using NVIDIA‟s Optimus technology, when the discrete GPU is handling all the rendering duties the final image output to the display is still handled by the Intel integrated graphics processor (IGP). [b]In effect, the IGP is only being used as a simple display controller[/b], resulting in a seamless, flicker-free experience with no need to reboot. When less critical or less demanding applications are run, the discrete GPU is powered off and the Intel IGP handles both rendering and display calls to conserve power and provide the highest possible battery life.[/quote]

So there would have to be more implemented into the Linux OS in order for Optimus to work. Optimus is software driven and relies on certain software framework, that is only currently available on Windows 7, to function. This framework is not (yet) implemented into Linux and probably won't be for some time. So even if Nvidia were to develop Optimus drivers for Linux the framework on the OS side would still not be in place.


Another way to think of Optimus:
Think of it like older manual (stick shift) and automatic transmission in a car. Traditional switchable graphics is like a manual (stick shift) where you can manually shift to whichever gear you like. Optimus is an automatic transmission and shifts on its own. What people are expecting of Optimus is that it is like a manually controlled automatic transmission, where it automatically shifts for you but you can shift with the paddles if you want. This is not the case, they are different technologies.

I hope all of this helps clear things up for some people.
I have explained above why this won't happen with Linux. I suggest reading the Optimus Whitepaper for more info. It is important to note that Optimus is not like the traditional way of doing switchable graphics.



Terms to understand first:

IGP = Intel GPU

Discrete GPU = Nvidia GPU

Multiplexer or MUX = Switch



Here are some selective quotes from it that illustrate what I am talking about: (Note: Quote blocks are all from the Optimus Whitepaper.)

Optimus technology leverages Windows 7‟s ability to allow two independent graphics drivers to be active at the same time.




The beauty of Optimus is that it leverages standard industry protocols and APIs to work. From relying on standard Microsoft APIs when communicating with the Intel IGP driver, to utilizing the PCI-Express bus to transfer the GPU‟s output to the Intel IGP, there are no proprietary hoops to jump through. NVIDIA‟s new hardware and software design seamlessly blends into the existing frameworks.






One of the primary advantages of Optimus compared to Switchable Graphics is that it does not need additional hardware like multiplexers. An Optimus implementation‟s simplicity reduces

costs, eases design and verification effort, and speeds time to market. As noted earlier, all display connections are made directly to the IGP. Regardless of which display adapter is

processing the workload, the IGP will push the output to the display.




The above quote is key to what makes Optimus different from traditional switchable graphics. With traditional switchable graphics there is a physical display switch between GPUs. This is why the screen blanks for a second or two when switching. With Optimus there is no direct connection to the display for the Nvidia GPU. So turning off the Intel GPU would essentially result no Nvidia GPU display.



The easiest way to think about it is like this:



Traditional Switchable Graphics:

If you are using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Digital Switch (multiplexer) that determines which GPU to output to the display -> Notebook LCD

If you are using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Digital Switch (multiplexer) that determines which GPU to output to the display -> Notebook LCD

The Multiplexer is the switch in switchable graphics. Think of it sort of like a light switch.



Optimus Technology:

If it is using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD

If it is using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD

The term "switchable graphics" doesn't really apply to Optimus IMHO because there is no real switch (multiplexer) like there is with traditional switchable graphics.



Or as it is put in the whitepaper:
When the (Nvidia) GPU can provide an increase in performance, functionality, or quality over the IGP for an application, the NVIDIA driver will enable the (Nvidia) GPU. When the user launches an application, the NVIDIA driver will recognize whether the application being run can benefit from using the (Nvidia) GPU. If the application can benefit from running on the (Nvidia) GPU, the (Nvidia) GPU is powered up from an idle state and is given all rendering calls. Using NVIDIA‟s Optimus technology, when the discrete GPU is handling all the rendering duties the final image output to the display is still handled by the Intel integrated graphics processor (IGP). In effect, the IGP is only being used as a simple display controller, resulting in a seamless, flicker-free experience with no need to reboot. When less critical or less demanding applications are run, the discrete GPU is powered off and the Intel IGP handles both rendering and display calls to conserve power and provide the highest possible battery life.




So there would have to be more implemented into the Linux OS in order for Optimus to work. Optimus is software driven and relies on certain software framework, that is only currently available on Windows 7, to function. This framework is not (yet) implemented into Linux and probably won't be for some time. So even if Nvidia were to develop Optimus drivers for Linux the framework on the OS side would still not be in place.





Another way to think of Optimus:

Think of it like older manual (stick shift) and automatic transmission in a car. Traditional switchable graphics is like a manual (stick shift) where you can manually shift to whichever gear you like. Optimus is an automatic transmission and shifts on its own. What people are expecting of Optimus is that it is like a manually controlled automatic transmission, where it automatically shifts for you but you can shift with the paddles if you want. This is not the case, they are different technologies.



I hope all of this helps clear things up for some people.

#6
Posted 12/22/2010 04:01 AM   
[quote name='Nautis' date='22 December 2010 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1292990473' post='1164718']
I have explained above why this won't happen with Linux. I suggest reading the [url="http://www.nvidia.com/object/LO_optimus_whitepapers.html"]Optimus Whitepaper[/url] for more info. It is important to note that Optimus is not like the traditional way of doing switchable graphics
...
I hope all of this helps clear things up for some people.
[/quote]

Sorry, this answer is entirely unrelated to the topic and I don't want it to become a topic about "making Optimus and Linux work". Its about being able to use the NVidia card at all in Linux, not more not less, no switching, no energy saving, no whatever. Just plain using the card instead having some expensive power consuming garbage in the Laptop and that should be possible without rewriting the whole X-Window system.

A lot of people will be entirely happy if they are only able to use the card, Optimus functionality is [b][u]NOT[/u][/b] requested here.
[quote name='Nautis' date='22 December 2010 - 05:01 AM' timestamp='1292990473' post='1164718']

I have explained above why this won't happen with Linux. I suggest reading the Optimus Whitepaper for more info. It is important to note that Optimus is not like the traditional way of doing switchable graphics

...

I hope all of this helps clear things up for some people.





Sorry, this answer is entirely unrelated to the topic and I don't want it to become a topic about "making Optimus and Linux work". Its about being able to use the NVidia card at all in Linux, not more not less, no switching, no energy saving, no whatever. Just plain using the card instead having some expensive power consuming garbage in the Laptop and that should be possible without rewriting the whole X-Window system.



A lot of people will be entirely happy if they are only able to use the card, Optimus functionality is NOT requested here.

#7
Posted 12/22/2010 11:45 AM   
[quote name='Nautis' date='22 December 2010 - 01:01 AM' timestamp='1292990473' post='1164718']

Optimus Technology:
If it is using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD
If it is using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD
The term "switchable graphics" doesn't really apply to Optimus IMHO because there is no real switch (multiplexer) like there is with traditional switchable graphics.

[/quote]

Man, thanks to make this technology more comprehensive. Now make some sense the nvidia card don't work in my Z360.

But, thinking in Linux support to this technology, do you think that it's possible in future? In other words, Linux's developers will need some help from NVIDIA® to understand the way to work, don't will? Or the "power" is in the hand of Micro$oft?

Thanks
[quote name='Nautis' date='22 December 2010 - 01:01 AM' timestamp='1292990473' post='1164718']



Optimus Technology:

If it is using Performance Mode: Nvidia GPU -> Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD

If it is using Power Saving Mode: Intel GPU -> Notebook LCD

The term "switchable graphics" doesn't really apply to Optimus IMHO because there is no real switch (multiplexer) like there is with traditional switchable graphics.







Man, thanks to make this technology more comprehensive. Now make some sense the nvidia card don't work in my Z360.



But, thinking in Linux support to this technology, do you think that it's possible in future? In other words, Linux's developers will need some help from NVIDIA® to understand the way to work, don't will? Or the "power" is in the hand of Micro$oft?



Thanks

#8
Posted 12/25/2010 07:57 PM   
[quote name='zhushazang' date='25 December 2010 - 08:57 PM' timestamp='1293307047' post='1166216']
Man, thanks to make this technology more comprehensive. Now make some sense the nvidia card don't work in my Z360.

But, thinking in Linux support to this technology, do you think that it's possible in future? In other words, Linux's developers will need some help from NVIDIA® to understand the way to work, don't will? Or the "power" is in the hand of Micro$oft?

Thanks
[/quote]

I bet it will be like always, some enthusiasts will work their a***s off to make it work, without any serious help or support and once it's running the people will start to forget about this ignorant and careless way NVidia handles it now.

I mean, they are not even willing to make basically working drivers, even without Optimus support, so what do you expect?
[quote name='zhushazang' date='25 December 2010 - 08:57 PM' timestamp='1293307047' post='1166216']

Man, thanks to make this technology more comprehensive. Now make some sense the nvidia card don't work in my Z360.



But, thinking in Linux support to this technology, do you think that it's possible in future? In other words, Linux's developers will need some help from NVIDIA® to understand the way to work, don't will? Or the "power" is in the hand of Micro$oft?



Thanks





I bet it will be like always, some enthusiasts will work their a***s off to make it work, without any serious help or support and once it's running the people will start to forget about this ignorant and careless way NVidia handles it now.



I mean, they are not even willing to make basically working drivers, even without Optimus support, so what do you expect?

#9
Posted 12/31/2010 09:38 AM   
I am also looking for support for Optimus in Linux.

I am not certain, but I highly doubt Optimus can only work under Windows, even if it was not designed for other OS such as Ubuntu.

The difficulty with Optimus is neither the IGP or Nvidia GPU through IGP will display properly consistently or sometimes not at all.

I am also asking Nvidia to implement a driver solution to allow at least one or the other between IGP --> Display and Nvidia --> IGP --> Display to work with Linux using a Nvidia driver.

It seems silly not to support this and deny many users this option. Optimus appears to be Nvidia's middle-end mainstream solution to laptop graphics. I don't understand why Nvidia would give us a reason to avoid Optimus in the future, rather than be proactive and invest a little time into solving such a measly R&D software problem (measly in comparison to investment required to make new GPUs and Nvidia's total day-to-day operation).
I am also looking for support for Optimus in Linux.



I am not certain, but I highly doubt Optimus can only work under Windows, even if it was not designed for other OS such as Ubuntu.



The difficulty with Optimus is neither the IGP or Nvidia GPU through IGP will display properly consistently or sometimes not at all.



I am also asking Nvidia to implement a driver solution to allow at least one or the other between IGP --> Display and Nvidia --> IGP --> Display to work with Linux using a Nvidia driver.



It seems silly not to support this and deny many users this option. Optimus appears to be Nvidia's middle-end mainstream solution to laptop graphics. I don't understand why Nvidia would give us a reason to avoid Optimus in the future, rather than be proactive and invest a little time into solving such a measly R&D software problem (measly in comparison to investment required to make new GPUs and Nvidia's total day-to-day operation).

#10
Posted 01/03/2011 12:32 AM   
[quote name='curryking3' date='03 January 2011 - 01:32 AM' timestamp='1294014720' post='1170075']
I am also looking for support for Optimus in Linux.

I am not certain, but I highly doubt Optimus can only work under Windows, even if it was not designed for other OS such as Ubuntu.

The difficulty with Optimus is neither the IGP or Nvidia GPU through IGP will display properly consistently or sometimes not at all.

I am also asking Nvidia to implement a driver solution to allow at least one or the other between IGP --> Display and Nvidia --> IGP --> Display to work with Linux using a Nvidia driver.

It seems silly not to support this and deny many users this option. Optimus appears to be Nvidia's middle-end mainstream solution to laptop graphics. I don't understand why Nvidia would give us a reason to avoid Optimus in the future, rather than be proactive and invest a little time into solving such a measly R&D software problem (measly in comparison to investment required to make new GPUs and Nvidia's total day-to-day operation).
[/quote]

well, as Nautis explained pretty detailed, there are a couple of requirements which make it pretty impossible to make Optimus run at the moment in Linux- and that's not what I criticize here- there are good technical reasons it can't be implemented, at least at the moment. What I really don't understand however, is why there can't be provided a solution to make the card usable at all.
I bought this Laptop being very well aware not to be able to use Optimus but I'm sure it happened to many people also, that I'd never expected that this would make it impossible at all to use the NVidia card after all the years of flawless working drivers.

If it is really important to the professional guys out there who are working on the X-Window system, they'll find a way sooner or later to fulfill the necessary requirements to make Optimus working on Linux, although even there the support from NVidia is almost nothing from what I read.
Ok, this is maybe "politics" because they want to keep their stuff confidential and that's more or less understandable, but it doesn't explain their current decision to drop any Linux driver support for this kind of hybrid system.

The development for things like switcheroo which will eventually allow soon in general to turn off the NVidia card when not needed, to safe the battery lifetime will satisfy probably most of the Linux users until Optimus will be possible.
But even if there would be never Optimus for Linux, anyone still could buy a consumer Laptop without having to fear wasting a lot of money for something unusable- that of course [b]IF[/b] NVidia would spend some effort in making a working driver. It just would be as it was before: Maybe little battery lifetime, but at least full performance.
[quote name='curryking3' date='03 January 2011 - 01:32 AM' timestamp='1294014720' post='1170075']

I am also looking for support for Optimus in Linux.



I am not certain, but I highly doubt Optimus can only work under Windows, even if it was not designed for other OS such as Ubuntu.



The difficulty with Optimus is neither the IGP or Nvidia GPU through IGP will display properly consistently or sometimes not at all.



I am also asking Nvidia to implement a driver solution to allow at least one or the other between IGP --> Display and Nvidia --> IGP --> Display to work with Linux using a Nvidia driver.



It seems silly not to support this and deny many users this option. Optimus appears to be Nvidia's middle-end mainstream solution to laptop graphics. I don't understand why Nvidia would give us a reason to avoid Optimus in the future, rather than be proactive and invest a little time into solving such a measly R&D software problem (measly in comparison to investment required to make new GPUs and Nvidia's total day-to-day operation).





well, as Nautis explained pretty detailed, there are a couple of requirements which make it pretty impossible to make Optimus run at the moment in Linux- and that's not what I criticize here- there are good technical reasons it can't be implemented, at least at the moment. What I really don't understand however, is why there can't be provided a solution to make the card usable at all.

I bought this Laptop being very well aware not to be able to use Optimus but I'm sure it happened to many people also, that I'd never expected that this would make it impossible at all to use the NVidia card after all the years of flawless working drivers.



If it is really important to the professional guys out there who are working on the X-Window system, they'll find a way sooner or later to fulfill the necessary requirements to make Optimus working on Linux, although even there the support from NVidia is almost nothing from what I read.

Ok, this is maybe "politics" because they want to keep their stuff confidential and that's more or less understandable, but it doesn't explain their current decision to drop any Linux driver support for this kind of hybrid system.



The development for things like switcheroo which will eventually allow soon in general to turn off the NVidia card when not needed, to safe the battery lifetime will satisfy probably most of the Linux users until Optimus will be possible.

But even if there would be never Optimus for Linux, anyone still could buy a consumer Laptop without having to fear wasting a lot of money for something unusable- that of course IF NVidia would spend some effort in making a working driver. It just would be as it was before: Maybe little battery lifetime, but at least full performance.

#11
Posted 01/04/2011 01:36 PM   
This is a real shame because NVidia had a good rep for supporting Linux.

I almost bought an Asus 1215N before reading about these issues and now I'm changing to an HP DM4 instead.

Had problems with the first ion in an Asrock nettop which kept freezing but that was solved with a later release of Ubuntu. But this ion2 stuff sounds as though it will take some time to fix and I'm just not taking the chance.
This is a real shame because NVidia had a good rep for supporting Linux.



I almost bought an Asus 1215N before reading about these issues and now I'm changing to an HP DM4 instead.



Had problems with the first ion in an Asrock nettop which kept freezing but that was solved with a later release of Ubuntu. But this ion2 stuff sounds as though it will take some time to fix and I'm just not taking the chance.

#12
Posted 01/04/2011 06:18 PM   
Thanks for the response Smirf.

I found some resources on the Ubuntu forum. One thread is made by me a few months ago.

Another is a thread by a second user who tried to explain the problem thoroughly and also offer some solutions.

The two threads are here:

[url="http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1586292"]Ubuntu and Nvidia Optimus for Laptops[/url]

[url="http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1657660&highlight=optimus"]Nvidia Optimus and Ubuntu Explained[/url]

Cheers.
Thanks for the response Smirf.



I found some resources on the Ubuntu forum. One thread is made by me a few months ago.



Another is a thread by a second user who tried to explain the problem thoroughly and also offer some solutions.



The two threads are here:



Ubuntu and Nvidia Optimus for Laptops



Nvidia Optimus and Ubuntu Explained



Cheers.

#13
Posted 01/05/2011 02:06 AM   
[quote name='curryking3' date='05 January 2011 - 03:06 AM' timestamp='1294193180' post='1171469']
Thanks for the response Smirf.

I found some resources on the Ubuntu forum. One thread is made by me a few months ago.

Another is a thread by a second user who tried to explain the problem thoroughly and also offer some solutions.

The two threads are here:

[url="http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1586292"]Ubuntu and Nvidia Optimus for Laptops[/url]

[url="http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1657660&highlight=optimus"]Nvidia Optimus and Ubuntu Explained[/url]

Cheers.
[/quote]
Thanks for the links.

Unfortunately I didn't find anything new in there. All possible at the moment seems to be disabling the NVidia card- and that is not really important to me. When traveling, my Laptop is having enough battery lifetime for my needs. Also it seems I'd need a newer kernel to make this work, so I'm sure I'll try that again sooner or later, but at the moment its more or less a waste of time for me.

I installed the Intel driver with Mesa stuff, so I can use OpenGL and its working better than expected, but the performance is horrible. Interestingly it seems that the older Bios version (K52JcAS206, don't know why the hell they removed it in the newer version) of my Laptop (Asus K52JC) is having an option to turn off the NVidia card, so I maybe can reduce at least the power it needs that way, but as said already, that's not the solution and absolutely not satisfying.
[quote name='curryking3' date='05 January 2011 - 03:06 AM' timestamp='1294193180' post='1171469']

Thanks for the response Smirf.



I found some resources on the Ubuntu forum. One thread is made by me a few months ago.



Another is a thread by a second user who tried to explain the problem thoroughly and also offer some solutions.



The two threads are here:



Ubuntu and Nvidia Optimus for Laptops



Nvidia Optimus and Ubuntu Explained



Cheers.



Thanks for the links.



Unfortunately I didn't find anything new in there. All possible at the moment seems to be disabling the NVidia card- and that is not really important to me. When traveling, my Laptop is having enough battery lifetime for my needs. Also it seems I'd need a newer kernel to make this work, so I'm sure I'll try that again sooner or later, but at the moment its more or less a waste of time for me.



I installed the Intel driver with Mesa stuff, so I can use OpenGL and its working better than expected, but the performance is horrible. Interestingly it seems that the older Bios version (K52JcAS206, don't know why the hell they removed it in the newer version) of my Laptop (Asus K52JC) is having an option to turn off the NVidia card, so I maybe can reduce at least the power it needs that way, but as said already, that's not the solution and absolutely not satisfying.

#14
Posted 01/07/2011 02:09 PM   
I have the same problem(
I have the same problem(

#15
Posted 01/12/2011 09:25 PM   
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