GeForce 8400GS low-profile fan oiling/lubrication? There doesn't seem to an obvious way to acces
I need to lubricate my low-profile 8400GS fan, but there is not an obvious way of doing so. There is no sticker over the ball-bearing or shaft assembly. The fan casing is just one solid piece of plastic with a centimeter square of thermal paste on the back. The GPU was off for a month or so, and now its fan is making a horrible grinding noise. I really need to oil the fan, and would greatly appreciate any insight as to how to go about doing so with this card. Note that card I have has a completely different fan than the whitish one most vendors have.
I need to lubricate my low-profile 8400GS fan, but there is not an obvious way of doing so. There is no sticker over the ball-bearing or shaft assembly. The fan casing is just one solid piece of plastic with a centimeter square of thermal paste on the back. The GPU was off for a month or so, and now its fan is making a horrible grinding noise. I really need to oil the fan, and would greatly appreciate any insight as to how to go about doing so with this card. Note that card I have has a completely different fan than the whitish one most vendors have.

#1
Posted 11/03/2010 12:39 PM   
I need to lubricate my low-profile 8400GS fan, but there is not an obvious way of doing so. There is no sticker over the ball-bearing or shaft assembly. The fan casing is just one solid piece of plastic with a centimeter square of thermal paste on the back. The GPU was off for a month or so, and now its fan is making a horrible grinding noise. I really need to oil the fan, and would greatly appreciate any insight as to how to go about doing so with this card. Note that card I have has a completely different fan than the whitish one most vendors have.
I need to lubricate my low-profile 8400GS fan, but there is not an obvious way of doing so. There is no sticker over the ball-bearing or shaft assembly. The fan casing is just one solid piece of plastic with a centimeter square of thermal paste on the back. The GPU was off for a month or so, and now its fan is making a horrible grinding noise. I really need to oil the fan, and would greatly appreciate any insight as to how to go about doing so with this card. Note that card I have has a completely different fan than the whitish one most vendors have.

#2
Posted 11/03/2010 12:39 PM   
I had the same problem with my EVGA 9500GT.I heated up the tip of a pin and used that to melt a hole near the center of the fan next to where the shaft meets the fan so the oil will run down the shaft to the bearings.I chose this method over using a drill to avoid removing material which would throw the fan off balance.The surface tension of the oil causes the oil to resist flowing through the hole so i used the pin to push the oil through.Now that you have a way to get lubrication where it's needed,future maintenance can be done in 10 minutes or less.It's been 8 months and I only had to repeat twice.
I had the same problem with my EVGA 9500GT.I heated up the tip of a pin and used that to melt a hole near the center of the fan next to where the shaft meets the fan so the oil will run down the shaft to the bearings.I chose this method over using a drill to avoid removing material which would throw the fan off balance.The surface tension of the oil causes the oil to resist flowing through the hole so i used the pin to push the oil through.Now that you have a way to get lubrication where it's needed,future maintenance can be done in 10 minutes or less.It's been 8 months and I only had to repeat twice.

#3
Posted 11/03/2010 06:44 PM   
I had the same problem with my EVGA 9500GT.I heated up the tip of a pin and used that to melt a hole near the center of the fan next to where the shaft meets the fan so the oil will run down the shaft to the bearings.I chose this method over using a drill to avoid removing material which would throw the fan off balance.The surface tension of the oil causes the oil to resist flowing through the hole so i used the pin to push the oil through.Now that you have a way to get lubrication where it's needed,future maintenance can be done in 10 minutes or less.It's been 8 months and I only had to repeat twice.
I had the same problem with my EVGA 9500GT.I heated up the tip of a pin and used that to melt a hole near the center of the fan next to where the shaft meets the fan so the oil will run down the shaft to the bearings.I chose this method over using a drill to avoid removing material which would throw the fan off balance.The surface tension of the oil causes the oil to resist flowing through the hole so i used the pin to push the oil through.Now that you have a way to get lubrication where it's needed,future maintenance can be done in 10 minutes or less.It's been 8 months and I only had to repeat twice.

#4
Posted 11/03/2010 06:44 PM   
I don't want to risk permanently disabling the fan by burning a hole in it, seeing as there doesn't seem to be anyone selling that specific fan or even the card itself. Do you cover up the hole with anything to prevent any amount of lubricant from leaking out (if that's even possible)?

I wish someone from nVidia would look into this...
I don't want to risk permanently disabling the fan by burning a hole in it, seeing as there doesn't seem to be anyone selling that specific fan or even the card itself. Do you cover up the hole with anything to prevent any amount of lubricant from leaking out (if that's even possible)?



I wish someone from nVidia would look into this...

#5
Posted 11/04/2010 01:47 AM   
I don't want to risk permanently disabling the fan by burning a hole in it, seeing as there doesn't seem to be anyone selling that specific fan or even the card itself. Do you cover up the hole with anything to prevent any amount of lubricant from leaking out (if that's even possible)?

I wish someone from nVidia would look into this...
I don't want to risk permanently disabling the fan by burning a hole in it, seeing as there doesn't seem to be anyone selling that specific fan or even the card itself. Do you cover up the hole with anything to prevent any amount of lubricant from leaking out (if that's even possible)?



I wish someone from nVidia would look into this...

#6
Posted 11/04/2010 01:47 AM   
Well look at it this way.Your fan will soon be "permanently disabled" if you continue to run it like that.Not to mention that the rest of your card will also become "permanently disabled" when it over heats like mine nearly did.Good thing I checked my temp when I did.It was in the 80's near 90c at idle,almost double what it should have been.You see the noise is caused by friction which slows the fan down causing temps to go up.The extra drag and slower speed of the fan causes the electric motor to get hot driving temps up even more.Then the heat from the motor causes more wear and tear on the bearings and the whole thing starts over again getting worse and worse.You can try this now or buy a new card not too much later.It's your choice.
As for the hole,no you don't need to cover it.the amount of oil needed to coat the tiny bearings in this tiny little motor is like 1 drop or less.Just make sure you give the oil a few seconds to run down to where you want it then give the fan a spin with your finger to spread it out evenly and install the card.If you don't get enough in there the first time the add another drop and try again.
Well look at it this way.Your fan will soon be "permanently disabled" if you continue to run it like that.Not to mention that the rest of your card will also become "permanently disabled" when it over heats like mine nearly did.Good thing I checked my temp when I did.It was in the 80's near 90c at idle,almost double what it should have been.You see the noise is caused by friction which slows the fan down causing temps to go up.The extra drag and slower speed of the fan causes the electric motor to get hot driving temps up even more.Then the heat from the motor causes more wear and tear on the bearings and the whole thing starts over again getting worse and worse.You can try this now or buy a new card not too much later.It's your choice.

As for the hole,no you don't need to cover it.the amount of oil needed to coat the tiny bearings in this tiny little motor is like 1 drop or less.Just make sure you give the oil a few seconds to run down to where you want it then give the fan a spin with your finger to spread it out evenly and install the card.If you don't get enough in there the first time the add another drop and try again.

#7
Posted 11/05/2010 08:53 PM   
Well look at it this way.Your fan will soon be "permanently disabled" if you continue to run it like that.Not to mention that the rest of your card will also become "permanently disabled" when it over heats like mine nearly did.Good thing I checked my temp when I did.It was in the 80's near 90c at idle,almost double what it should have been.You see the noise is caused by friction which slows the fan down causing temps to go up.The extra drag and slower speed of the fan causes the electric motor to get hot driving temps up even more.Then the heat from the motor causes more wear and tear on the bearings and the whole thing starts over again getting worse and worse.You can try this now or buy a new card not too much later.It's your choice.
As for the hole,no you don't need to cover it.the amount of oil needed to coat the tiny bearings in this tiny little motor is like 1 drop or less.Just make sure you give the oil a few seconds to run down to where you want it then give the fan a spin with your finger to spread it out evenly and install the card.If you don't get enough in there the first time the add another drop and try again.
Well look at it this way.Your fan will soon be "permanently disabled" if you continue to run it like that.Not to mention that the rest of your card will also become "permanently disabled" when it over heats like mine nearly did.Good thing I checked my temp when I did.It was in the 80's near 90c at idle,almost double what it should have been.You see the noise is caused by friction which slows the fan down causing temps to go up.The extra drag and slower speed of the fan causes the electric motor to get hot driving temps up even more.Then the heat from the motor causes more wear and tear on the bearings and the whole thing starts over again getting worse and worse.You can try this now or buy a new card not too much later.It's your choice.

As for the hole,no you don't need to cover it.the amount of oil needed to coat the tiny bearings in this tiny little motor is like 1 drop or less.Just make sure you give the oil a few seconds to run down to where you want it then give the fan a spin with your finger to spread it out evenly and install the card.If you don't get enough in there the first time the add another drop and try again.

#8
Posted 11/05/2010 08:53 PM   
What type of pin did you use and how did you go about hearing it?
What type of pin did you use and how did you go about hearing it?

#9
Posted 11/05/2010 10:49 PM   
What type of pin did you use and how did you go about hearing it?
What type of pin did you use and how did you go about hearing it?

#10
Posted 11/05/2010 10:49 PM   
If anyone every looks at this, I have a 2 year old GeForceGS that developed the same noise problem. I used a very small drill bit (sewing pin size) and put in 2 holes (one on each side of the drive shaft for balance). 1 drop of hair clipper oil and it sucked right in and the noise is gone. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />
If anyone every looks at this, I have a 2 year old GeForceGS that developed the same noise problem. I used a very small drill bit (sewing pin size) and put in 2 holes (one on each side of the drive shaft for balance). 1 drop of hair clipper oil and it sucked right in and the noise is gone. /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />

#11
Posted 12/07/2011 08:37 PM   
I have a 4 year old GeForce 8400GS 256MB that shipped with my HP Pavillion Pro (with HDMI, DVI and S-Video outs). Fan started making a bad, grinding noise. Took out the card, removed the fan and cleaned it out, but still a bad noise. Then read this forum. Removed the fan again, took of the back metal heat sink (three screws) and saw that there was already a pin hole near the drive shaft of the fan. Pushed in some 3-in-one lubricant with a pin, reassembled, and no noise! Thanks to the previous posters!
I have a 4 year old GeForce 8400GS 256MB that shipped with my HP Pavillion Pro (with HDMI, DVI and S-Video outs). Fan started making a bad, grinding noise. Took out the card, removed the fan and cleaned it out, but still a bad noise. Then read this forum. Removed the fan again, took of the back metal heat sink (three screws) and saw that there was already a pin hole near the drive shaft of the fan. Pushed in some 3-in-one lubricant with a pin, reassembled, and no noise! Thanks to the previous posters!

#12
Posted 01/08/2012 08:29 PM   
I should have mentioned that on my particular model there was a round sticker over the fan hub assembly. The pin hole is under the sticker, near the center.
I should have mentioned that on my particular model there was a round sticker over the fan hub assembly. The pin hole is under the sticker, near the center.

#13
Posted 01/08/2012 08:30 PM   
fireball, I've been subscribed to this topic since day one and am grateful for your reply. I haven't tried the drilling yet but just may have to because the card is starting to have the same issue. This is a different card than the one I had a problem in my original post over a year ago, since after posting this topic I actually did manage to find someone that sells the card and replaced the ailing one. I'm disappointed that the new card started having the same problem only a year later, but maybe I wont have to replace it if the hole thing works.
fireball, I've been subscribed to this topic since day one and am grateful for your reply. I haven't tried the drilling yet but just may have to because the card is starting to have the same issue. This is a different card than the one I had a problem in my original post over a year ago, since after posting this topic I actually did manage to find someone that sells the card and replaced the ailing one. I'm disappointed that the new card started having the same problem only a year later, but maybe I wont have to replace it if the hole thing works.

#14
Posted 01/08/2012 08:43 PM   
I had a PNY 8500GT which started making the fan rattle noise after a few years. Happily, it's see-through, and easy to disassemble.
I unscrewed the fan from the heatsink, peeled the sticker from the back of the fan, removed the big rubber plug that protected the bearing, put two drops of sewing machine (3-in-1) oil in the hole, and put it all back together. And the noise is gone!

Incidentally, the sticker I peeled off the back of the fan said "Evercool. Low noise. Long life time. EC5010L12D. EL Bearing." The manufacturer describes the EL bearing as having a 50,000 hour lifetime (that's 2000 days, or 5.7 years). Didn't quite make it that long here.

Unhapily, I also have a PNY GT220 that has the problem, and its fan is sealed. If I had only registered it within the requisite 90 days it would have still been in warranty, but now I guess I have to try the drill-a-hole trick. Yuck. Another case of newer stuff being harder to repair.
I had a PNY 8500GT which started making the fan rattle noise after a few years. Happily, it's see-through, and easy to disassemble.

I unscrewed the fan from the heatsink, peeled the sticker from the back of the fan, removed the big rubber plug that protected the bearing, put two drops of sewing machine (3-in-1) oil in the hole, and put it all back together. And the noise is gone!



Incidentally, the sticker I peeled off the back of the fan said "Evercool. Low noise. Long life time. EC5010L12D. EL Bearing." The manufacturer describes the EL bearing as having a 50,000 hour lifetime (that's 2000 days, or 5.7 years). Didn't quite make it that long here.



Unhapily, I also have a PNY GT220 that has the problem, and its fan is sealed. If I had only registered it within the requisite 90 days it would have still been in warranty, but now I guess I have to try the drill-a-hole trick. Yuck. Another case of newer stuff being harder to repair.

#15
Posted 02/02/2012 06:20 PM   
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