High Precision Event Timer and gaming performance
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Can anyone explain to me what HPET does exactly?

A guy on another forum claimed that by disabling it, his DPC latency plummeted and his gaming performance improved; most notably the microstuttering.

So I tried it myself, and the difference to my astonishment, was very noticeable. First off, my DPC latency dropped big time. Not that it was high to begin with, but now it hovers below 10 for the most part.

Second, I noticed that general windows performance felt snappier. I know I'm not imagining things, because like many, I scrutinize my system so I'm sensitive to even minute changes in performance.

And last but not least, gaming performance is definitely smoother. Anyone with SLi will tell you that occassionally when playing a game, you experience a bit of lag or stuttering for no apparent reason whatsoever. Most people attribute these minor discrepancies to SLi, but what if it's something else? Because I can tell you, that my overall gaming experience has improved since turning HPET off.

If you have the HPET option in your BIOS, I highly recommend experimenting with it and see if it impacts your performance. There's a possibility that having it on could increase the amount of microstuttering in any given game; particularly if you're running SLi.
Can anyone explain to me what HPET does exactly?



A guy on another forum claimed that by disabling it, his DPC latency plummeted and his gaming performance improved; most notably the microstuttering.



So I tried it myself, and the difference to my astonishment, was very noticeable. First off, my DPC latency dropped big time. Not that it was high to begin with, but now it hovers below 10 for the most part.



Second, I noticed that general windows performance felt snappier. I know I'm not imagining things, because like many, I scrutinize my system so I'm sensitive to even minute changes in performance.



And last but not least, gaming performance is definitely smoother. Anyone with SLi will tell you that occassionally when playing a game, you experience a bit of lag or stuttering for no apparent reason whatsoever. Most people attribute these minor discrepancies to SLi, but what if it's something else? Because I can tell you, that my overall gaming experience has improved since turning HPET off.



If you have the HPET option in your BIOS, I highly recommend experimenting with it and see if it impacts your performance. There's a possibility that having it on could increase the amount of microstuttering in any given game; particularly if you're running SLi.

Intel Core i7 3930K @ 4.6ghz HT on
Noctua NH-D14
AsRock Extreme 6 X79
16 GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z DDR3 @ 2400 10-12-11-31 CR1
Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB SLi @ 1280 MHz
EVGA GTX 650 Ti PhysX
Creative X-Fi Platinum Fatal1ty Champion
Sennheiser HD-555
Samsung 840 Evo 1TB SSD
Asus 12x Blu-Ray Burner
Sony Optiarc 24x DVD Burner with NEC chipset
Antec HCP-1200w Power Supply
Yamakasi Catleap Q270 SE
Coolermaster HAF 932
Logitech G500 gaming mouse w/Razer Exact Mat
Logitech G19 gaming keyboard
Windows 8.1 x64 Pro

#1
Posted 10/19/2010 11:22 AM   
Can anyone explain to me what HPET does exactly?

A guy on another forum claimed that by disabling it, his DPC latency plummeted and his gaming performance improved; most notably the microstuttering.

So I tried it myself, and the difference to my astonishment, was very noticeable. First off, my DPC latency dropped big time. Not that it was high to begin with, but now it hovers below 10 for the most part.

Second, I noticed that general windows performance felt snappier. I know I'm not imagining things, because like many, I scrutinize my system so I'm sensitive to even minute changes in performance.

And last but not least, gaming performance is definitely smoother. Anyone with SLi will tell you that occassionally when playing a game, you experience a bit of lag or stuttering for no apparent reason whatsoever. Most people attribute these minor discrepancies to SLi, but what if it's something else? Because I can tell you, that my overall gaming experience has improved since turning HPET off.

If you have the HPET option in your BIOS, I highly recommend experimenting with it and see if it impacts your performance. There's a possibility that having it on could increase the amount of microstuttering in any given game; particularly if you're running SLi.
Can anyone explain to me what HPET does exactly?



A guy on another forum claimed that by disabling it, his DPC latency plummeted and his gaming performance improved; most notably the microstuttering.



So I tried it myself, and the difference to my astonishment, was very noticeable. First off, my DPC latency dropped big time. Not that it was high to begin with, but now it hovers below 10 for the most part.



Second, I noticed that general windows performance felt snappier. I know I'm not imagining things, because like many, I scrutinize my system so I'm sensitive to even minute changes in performance.



And last but not least, gaming performance is definitely smoother. Anyone with SLi will tell you that occassionally when playing a game, you experience a bit of lag or stuttering for no apparent reason whatsoever. Most people attribute these minor discrepancies to SLi, but what if it's something else? Because I can tell you, that my overall gaming experience has improved since turning HPET off.



If you have the HPET option in your BIOS, I highly recommend experimenting with it and see if it impacts your performance. There's a possibility that having it on could increase the amount of microstuttering in any given game; particularly if you're running SLi.

Intel Core i7 3930K @ 4.6ghz HT on
Noctua NH-D14
AsRock Extreme 6 X79
16 GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z DDR3 @ 2400 10-12-11-31 CR1
Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB SLi @ 1280 MHz
EVGA GTX 650 Ti PhysX
Creative X-Fi Platinum Fatal1ty Champion
Sennheiser HD-555
Samsung 840 Evo 1TB SSD
Asus 12x Blu-Ray Burner
Sony Optiarc 24x DVD Burner with NEC chipset
Antec HCP-1200w Power Supply
Yamakasi Catleap Q270 SE
Coolermaster HAF 932
Logitech G500 gaming mouse w/Razer Exact Mat
Logitech G19 gaming keyboard
Windows 8.1 x64 Pro

#2
Posted 10/19/2010 11:22 AM   
HPET on x58 runs perfectly fine. it was only an issue on x38 boards.

it will lower dpc if disabled but not to the extent that it impacts user experience.
HPET on x58 runs perfectly fine. it was only an issue on x38 boards.



it will lower dpc if disabled but not to the extent that it impacts user experience.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#3
Posted 10/19/2010 11:44 AM   
HPET on x58 runs perfectly fine. it was only an issue on x38 boards.

it will lower dpc if disabled but not to the extent that it impacts user experience.
HPET on x58 runs perfectly fine. it was only an issue on x38 boards.



it will lower dpc if disabled but not to the extent that it impacts user experience.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#4
Posted 10/19/2010 11:44 AM   
If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.

I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..
If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.



I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..

Intel Core i7 3930K @ 4.6ghz HT on
Noctua NH-D14
AsRock Extreme 6 X79
16 GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z DDR3 @ 2400 10-12-11-31 CR1
Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB SLi @ 1280 MHz
EVGA GTX 650 Ti PhysX
Creative X-Fi Platinum Fatal1ty Champion
Sennheiser HD-555
Samsung 840 Evo 1TB SSD
Asus 12x Blu-Ray Burner
Sony Optiarc 24x DVD Burner with NEC chipset
Antec HCP-1200w Power Supply
Yamakasi Catleap Q270 SE
Coolermaster HAF 932
Logitech G500 gaming mouse w/Razer Exact Mat
Logitech G19 gaming keyboard
Windows 8.1 x64 Pro

#5
Posted 10/19/2010 01:05 PM   
If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.

I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..
If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.



I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..

Intel Core i7 3930K @ 4.6ghz HT on
Noctua NH-D14
AsRock Extreme 6 X79
16 GB G.Skill Ripjaws Z DDR3 @ 2400 10-12-11-31 CR1
Gigabyte GTX 770 4GB SLi @ 1280 MHz
EVGA GTX 650 Ti PhysX
Creative X-Fi Platinum Fatal1ty Champion
Sennheiser HD-555
Samsung 840 Evo 1TB SSD
Asus 12x Blu-Ray Burner
Sony Optiarc 24x DVD Burner with NEC chipset
Antec HCP-1200w Power Supply
Yamakasi Catleap Q270 SE
Coolermaster HAF 932
Logitech G500 gaming mouse w/Razer Exact Mat
Logitech G19 gaming keyboard
Windows 8.1 x64 Pro

#6
Posted 10/19/2010 01:05 PM   
the high precision event timer is used to ensure that applications that bypass the windows timing api's do not perform incorrectly.

[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer[/url]

[quote]and I could definitely notice the difference.[/quote]

Then you either have device drivers on your system that are causing Rechecks in the timers, or its placebo.
the high precision event timer is used to ensure that applications that bypass the windows timing api's do not perform incorrectly.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer



and I could definitely notice the difference.




Then you either have device drivers on your system that are causing Rechecks in the timers, or its placebo.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#7
Posted 10/19/2010 01:36 PM   
the high precision event timer is used to ensure that applications that bypass the windows timing api's do not perform incorrectly.

[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer[/url]

[quote]and I could definitely notice the difference.[/quote]

Then you either have device drivers on your system that are causing Rechecks in the timers, or its placebo.
the high precision event timer is used to ensure that applications that bypass the windows timing api's do not perform incorrectly.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Precision_Event_Timer



and I could definitely notice the difference.




Then you either have device drivers on your system that are causing Rechecks in the timers, or its placebo.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#8
Posted 10/19/2010 01:36 PM   
[quote name='Carfax' post='1133193' date='Oct 19 2010, 03:05 PM']If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.

I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..[/quote]


true, odd..

i have x48 mobo, and i always thought i had higher DPC because of sw fan control; well now that i turned it off its 5-15avg; before with 64bit HPET 75-115


looks like nv software has problems with this issue:

HPET is a continuously running timer that counts upward, not a one-shot device that counts down to zero, causes one interrupt and then stops. Since HPET compares the actual timer value and the programmed target value on equality rather than "greater or equal", interrupts can be missed if the target time has already passed when the comparator value is written into the chip's register. In the presence of non-maskable interrupts (such as System Management Interrupts)[u] that don't have a hard upper bound on their execution time, this race condition requires time-consuming re-checks of the timer after setup and is hard to avoid completely. [/u]
[quote name='Carfax' post='1133193' date='Oct 19 2010, 03:05 PM']If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.



I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..





true, odd..



i have x48 mobo, and i always thought i had higher DPC because of sw fan control; well now that i turned it off its 5-15avg; before with 64bit HPET 75-115





looks like nv software has problems with this issue:



HPET is a continuously running timer that counts upward, not a one-shot device that counts down to zero, causes one interrupt and then stops. Since HPET compares the actual timer value and the programmed target value on equality rather than "greater or equal", interrupts can be missed if the target time has already passed when the comparator value is written into the chip's register. In the presence of non-maskable interrupts (such as System Management Interrupts) that don't have a hard upper bound on their execution time, this race condition requires time-consuming re-checks of the timer after setup and is hard to avoid completely.

GPU: Inno3D GTX 580 1536MB OC
Monitor: EIZO Foris FS2333 [DVI-D]
CPU: Intel i7 4770K @ 4.5GHz [1.178v] | Corsair H90 custom P/P fans
Mainboard: Asus Z87-Deluxe [Bios 1802]
Ram:Crucial Balistix Elite 16GB CL10/1T @ 2400MHz [1.65v]
Sound: X-FI Titanium HD [Pcie SB1270]
HDD: Intel SSD 330 180Gb; Samsung F3 1Tb; Hitachi 500Gb
PSU: Chieftec NiTRO88+ 650w [52A]
OS: Windows 8.1.1 Pro WMC x64


Image

#9
Posted 10/19/2010 01:56 PM   
[quote name='Carfax' post='1133193' date='Oct 19 2010, 03:05 PM']If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.

I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..[/quote]


true, odd..

i have x48 mobo, and i always thought i had higher DPC because of sw fan control; well now that i turned it off its 5-15avg; before with 64bit HPET 75-115


looks like nv software has problems with this issue:

HPET is a continuously running timer that counts upward, not a one-shot device that counts down to zero, causes one interrupt and then stops. Since HPET compares the actual timer value and the programmed target value on equality rather than "greater or equal", interrupts can be missed if the target time has already passed when the comparator value is written into the chip's register. In the presence of non-maskable interrupts (such as System Management Interrupts)[u] that don't have a hard upper bound on their execution time, this race condition requires time-consuming re-checks of the timer after setup and is hard to avoid completely. [/u]
[quote name='Carfax' post='1133193' date='Oct 19 2010, 03:05 PM']If it runs perfectly fine, why does disabling it improve performance on my computer? Could it be bugged? My DPC latency dropped from well over 100 to under 10, and I could definitely notice the difference.



I also checked around on the net, and quite a number of other people have had a similar experience..





true, odd..



i have x48 mobo, and i always thought i had higher DPC because of sw fan control; well now that i turned it off its 5-15avg; before with 64bit HPET 75-115





looks like nv software has problems with this issue:



HPET is a continuously running timer that counts upward, not a one-shot device that counts down to zero, causes one interrupt and then stops. Since HPET compares the actual timer value and the programmed target value on equality rather than "greater or equal", interrupts can be missed if the target time has already passed when the comparator value is written into the chip's register. In the presence of non-maskable interrupts (such as System Management Interrupts) that don't have a hard upper bound on their execution time, this race condition requires time-consuming re-checks of the timer after setup and is hard to avoid completely.

GPU: Inno3D GTX 580 1536MB OC
Monitor: EIZO Foris FS2333 [DVI-D]
CPU: Intel i7 4770K @ 4.5GHz [1.178v] | Corsair H90 custom P/P fans
Mainboard: Asus Z87-Deluxe [Bios 1802]
Ram:Crucial Balistix Elite 16GB CL10/1T @ 2400MHz [1.65v]
Sound: X-FI Titanium HD [Pcie SB1270]
HDD: Intel SSD 330 180Gb; Samsung F3 1Tb; Hitachi 500Gb
PSU: Chieftec NiTRO88+ 650w [52A]
OS: Windows 8.1.1 Pro WMC x64


Image

#10
Posted 10/19/2010 01:56 PM   
it may be the display driver

or usb devices such as wifi.
it may be the display driver



or usb devices such as wifi.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#11
Posted 10/19/2010 01:59 PM   
it may be the display driver

or usb devices such as wifi.
it may be the display driver



or usb devices such as wifi.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#12
Posted 10/19/2010 01:59 PM   
on my x58 motherboard, tools that report my cpu speed would fluctuate saying that my CPU speed was constantly changing, by enabling the high precision event timer it is now stable.
on my x58 motherboard, tools that report my cpu speed would fluctuate saying that my CPU speed was constantly changing, by enabling the high precision event timer it is now stable.

_ NVLDDMKM problems_ | _ problems getting a driver for a laptop graphics card_ | _What PSU do I need?_

[quote name='The Professor' date='11 August 2011 - 10:33 AM' timestamp='1313055223' post='1277858']

I think Qazax is a pretty cool guy. eh kills aleins and doesnt afraid of anything.

#13
Posted 10/19/2010 02:15 PM   
on my x58 motherboard, tools that report my cpu speed would fluctuate saying that my CPU speed was constantly changing, by enabling the high precision event timer it is now stable.
on my x58 motherboard, tools that report my cpu speed would fluctuate saying that my CPU speed was constantly changing, by enabling the high precision event timer it is now stable.

_ NVLDDMKM problems_ | _ problems getting a driver for a laptop graphics card_ | _What PSU do I need?_

[quote name='The Professor' date='11 August 2011 - 10:33 AM' timestamp='1313055223' post='1277858']

I think Qazax is a pretty cool guy. eh kills aleins and doesnt afraid of anything.

#14
Posted 10/19/2010 02:15 PM   
that would be because without the HPET, the cpu is doing timer compensation.
that would be because without the HPET, the cpu is doing timer compensation.



In Memory of Chris "ChrisRay" Arthington, 1982-2010

CPU:Intel i7 920 @ 3.8(D0), Mainboard:Asus Rampage II Gene, Memory:12GB Corsair Vengeance 1600
Video:EVGA Geforce GTX 680+ 4GB, Sound:Creative XFI Titanium Fatal1ty Pro, Monitor:BenQ G2400WD
HDD:500GB Spinpoint F3, 1TB WD Black, 2TB WD Red, 1TB WD Black
Case:NZXT Guardian 921RB, PSU:Corsair 620HX, OS:Windows 7 SP1

#15
Posted 10/19/2010 03:10 PM   
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