64-bit vs. 128-bit memory interface - Whats the difference?
What is the difference between a card with 512 MB 64-bit memory interface vs. a card with 512 MB 128-bit memory interface?
Specifically what will I notice on my monitor when playing games or creating and manipulating 3D cad models?
What is the difference between a card with 512 MB 64-bit memory interface vs. a card with 512 MB 128-bit memory interface?

Specifically what will I notice on my monitor when playing games or creating and manipulating 3D cad models?

#1
Posted 07/18/2010 04:12 PM   
Twice the bus data width.

Think of it this way.

A two lane road as apposed to a four lane road. They have the same speed limit, but one can handle more traffic then the other.
Twice the bus data width.



Think of it this way.



A two lane road as apposed to a four lane road. They have the same speed limit, but one can handle more traffic then the other.

Using Left over CPU coolers to keep phones cool since 2012.

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#2
Posted 07/18/2010 04:47 PM   
So, more data can get to its destination per second? I have a 256 MB 64-bit memory interface video card that when I am rotating a small and simple 3D model, the 3D model is still rotating after I let go of the mouse ,maybe for half a second or so. When I use a 512MB 128-bit memory interface card it seems to rotate the model faster, smoother, and doesn't continue rotating after I let go of the mouse. Since the 3D model is a small file size and not very complex, would I be correct in assuming it iis being caused by the lower 64-bit memory interface rather than the lower 256MB ram???
So, more data can get to its destination per second? I have a 256 MB 64-bit memory interface video card that when I am rotating a small and simple 3D model, the 3D model is still rotating after I let go of the mouse ,maybe for half a second or so. When I use a 512MB 128-bit memory interface card it seems to rotate the model faster, smoother, and doesn't continue rotating after I let go of the mouse. Since the 3D model is a small file size and not very complex, would I be correct in assuming it iis being caused by the lower 64-bit memory interface rather than the lower 256MB ram???

#3
Posted 07/18/2010 06:22 PM   
A little of both...well, a LOT of both.

Your RAM has something to do with it...think of RAM as a "fuel tank" or capacitor. The more RAM you have, the more information is waiting for your GPU to render it after being passed to it by the CPU.

Now...your data transfer rate is directly affected by your interface bus width...a "tighter" width means less data ( usually measured in Gb / sec ) than a "broader" width. As Lordred said, it's like a road or highway with lanes. If the CPU can deliver it fast enough, then the GPU won't have to wait.

With the 256mb 64-bit card, your graphics card is still rendering data sent to it by the CPU after you let go of the mouse, probably due to the complexity of the image (and the fact that the less powerful card is basically "choking" on it...LOL). The more powerful card will render it faster, smoother and with better response at higher resolutions due to it's data transfer rate (often referred to as "memory bus width" ) and overall RAM.

Your actual GPU plays a major part in it as well, but if comparing two of the same GPU's (like a G92 chip) one with 256mb 64-bit and the other with 512mb 128-bit interface, the latter wins hands down.

Think of a graphics card as a computer WITHIN a computer...because essentially, that's what it is. There are many things that add up to that computer being faster or slower than another one, but that's a whole new topic.

In plain English, the better card will be "snappier"...heheh.
A little of both...well, a LOT of both.



Your RAM has something to do with it...think of RAM as a "fuel tank" or capacitor. The more RAM you have, the more information is waiting for your GPU to render it after being passed to it by the CPU.



Now...your data transfer rate is directly affected by your interface bus width...a "tighter" width means less data ( usually measured in Gb / sec ) than a "broader" width. As Lordred said, it's like a road or highway with lanes. If the CPU can deliver it fast enough, then the GPU won't have to wait.



With the 256mb 64-bit card, your graphics card is still rendering data sent to it by the CPU after you let go of the mouse, probably due to the complexity of the image (and the fact that the less powerful card is basically "choking" on it...LOL). The more powerful card will render it faster, smoother and with better response at higher resolutions due to it's data transfer rate (often referred to as "memory bus width" ) and overall RAM.



Your actual GPU plays a major part in it as well, but if comparing two of the same GPU's (like a G92 chip) one with 256mb 64-bit and the other with 512mb 128-bit interface, the latter wins hands down.



Think of a graphics card as a computer WITHIN a computer...because essentially, that's what it is. There are many things that add up to that computer being faster or slower than another one, but that's a whole new topic.



In plain English, the better card will be "snappier"...heheh.

Work in Progress:

Case: Corsair 650D
Motherboard: AsRock Z77 Extreme4
PSU: Antec TruePower New 750 Blue
CPU: Intel i5-2500K ( Socket 1155 )
CPU Cooler: ZalMan CNPS9500A LED
GPU: EVGA GTX 580
MEM: 8 GB G.Skill PC12800 DDR3 1600
Soundcard: Creative SB X-Fi Titanium
Monitor: Samsung 2343 BWX 23"@ 2048 x 1152
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit

My cards in order of ownership: Intergraph Intense3D Voodoo (Rush), 3Dfx Voodoo3 3000 PCI, PNY GeForce4 MX 420 PCI, PNY nVidia 6600 AGP, BFG 7600GS O.C. AGP, BFG 8600GTS O.C. PCI-E, Xfx 9800GT PCI-E (SLI), BFG GTX 260 Maxcore 55 PCI-E (SLI), EVGA GTX 560 Ti PCI-E, EVGA GTX 580 1.5gb PCI-E

#4
Posted 07/20/2010 12:44 AM   
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