nVidia drivers on a macbook pro
I'm a windows developer. I've written a scalable multimedia video streaming application for the windows platform that simultaneously displays multiple video streams to the user. The app is written in C++ using COM / DirectShow / ATL / WTL.

My boss recently went out and bought a Macbook Pro and the program blackscreen's when he connects to video feeds.

This same issue is observed on some, but not all PC hardware - and only when there's no graphics card drivers installed (in this instance, windows will use a reference driver - standard VGA adapter driver).

When the correct video card drivers are installed on a PC platform, the problem disappears.

Our network admin, who installed Windows 7 x64 on the Macbook Pro on behalf of my boss, informs me that:

1. The W7 install was performed using boot camp - and gfx drivers come from the apple OS disk / apple update.
2. The macbook pro gfx hardware is an nVidia card
3. The native drivers from nVidia do not detect nVidia hardware when they're executed on the Macbook Pro / W7 x64 platform.

You can imagine how difficult resolving this will be. I have exactly zero hours of Mac experience, and my boss uses the laptop a lot, so I don't even have access to the laptop!

Is there any way of:
forcing the macbook to use the native nVidia drivers? ( I realise, probably not the best solution, but I'm willing to try anything!)

Can anyone suggest any other alternatives?

thanks for any suggestions
I'm a windows developer. I've written a scalable multimedia video streaming application for the windows platform that simultaneously displays multiple video streams to the user. The app is written in C++ using COM / DirectShow / ATL / WTL.



My boss recently went out and bought a Macbook Pro and the program blackscreen's when he connects to video feeds.



This same issue is observed on some, but not all PC hardware - and only when there's no graphics card drivers installed (in this instance, windows will use a reference driver - standard VGA adapter driver).



When the correct video card drivers are installed on a PC platform, the problem disappears.



Our network admin, who installed Windows 7 x64 on the Macbook Pro on behalf of my boss, informs me that:



1. The W7 install was performed using boot camp - and gfx drivers come from the apple OS disk / apple update.

2. The macbook pro gfx hardware is an nVidia card

3. The native drivers from nVidia do not detect nVidia hardware when they're executed on the Macbook Pro / W7 x64 platform.



You can imagine how difficult resolving this will be. I have exactly zero hours of Mac experience, and my boss uses the laptop a lot, so I don't even have access to the laptop!



Is there any way of:

forcing the macbook to use the native nVidia drivers? ( I realise, probably not the best solution, but I'm willing to try anything!)



Can anyone suggest any other alternatives?



thanks for any suggestions

#1
Posted 05/28/2010 07:57 AM   
[quote name='freefallr' post='1063674' date='May 28 2010, 04:57 AM']I'm a windows developer. I've written a scalable multimedia video streaming application for the windows platform that simultaneously displays multiple video streams to the user. The app is written in C++ using COM / DirectShow / ATL / WTL.

My boss recently went out and bought a Macbook Pro and the program blackscreen's when he connects to video feeds.

This same issue is observed on some, but not all PC hardware - and only when there's no graphics card drivers installed (in this instance, windows will use a reference driver - standard VGA adapter driver).

When the correct video card drivers are installed on a PC platform, the problem disappears.

Our network admin, who installed Windows 7 x64 on the Macbook Pro on behalf of my boss, informs me that:

1. The W7 install was performed using boot camp - and gfx drivers come from the apple OS disk / apple update.
2. The macbook pro gfx hardware is an nVidia card
3. The native drivers from nVidia do not detect nVidia hardware when they're executed on the Macbook Pro / W7 x64 platform.

You can imagine how difficult resolving this will be. I have exactly zero hours of Mac experience, and my boss uses the laptop a lot, so I don't even have access to the laptop!

Is there any way of:
forcing the macbook to use the native nVidia drivers? ( I realise, probably not the best solution, but I'm willing to try anything!)

Can anyone suggest any other alternatives?

thanks for any suggestions[/quote]
Bootcamp only helps you to get a NTFS partition on your hard disk and install Windows. It will then run natively like in any other PC, so the nvidia drivers are what you're looking for. Are you sure you got the drivers for laptops? (they're not the same for desktops)
[quote name='freefallr' post='1063674' date='May 28 2010, 04:57 AM']I'm a windows developer. I've written a scalable multimedia video streaming application for the windows platform that simultaneously displays multiple video streams to the user. The app is written in C++ using COM / DirectShow / ATL / WTL.



My boss recently went out and bought a Macbook Pro and the program blackscreen's when he connects to video feeds.



This same issue is observed on some, but not all PC hardware - and only when there's no graphics card drivers installed (in this instance, windows will use a reference driver - standard VGA adapter driver).



When the correct video card drivers are installed on a PC platform, the problem disappears.



Our network admin, who installed Windows 7 x64 on the Macbook Pro on behalf of my boss, informs me that:



1. The W7 install was performed using boot camp - and gfx drivers come from the apple OS disk / apple update.

2. The macbook pro gfx hardware is an nVidia card

3. The native drivers from nVidia do not detect nVidia hardware when they're executed on the Macbook Pro / W7 x64 platform.



You can imagine how difficult resolving this will be. I have exactly zero hours of Mac experience, and my boss uses the laptop a lot, so I don't even have access to the laptop!



Is there any way of:

forcing the macbook to use the native nVidia drivers? ( I realise, probably not the best solution, but I'm willing to try anything!)



Can anyone suggest any other alternatives?



thanks for any suggestions

Bootcamp only helps you to get a NTFS partition on your hard disk and install Windows. It will then run natively like in any other PC, so the nvidia drivers are what you're looking for. Are you sure you got the drivers for laptops? (they're not the same for desktops)

#2
Posted 05/28/2010 02:00 PM   
[quote name='filipetolhuizen' post='1063849' date='May 28 2010, 07:00 AM']Bootcamp only helps you to get a NTFS partition on your hard disk and install Windows. It will then run natively like in any other PC, so the nvidia drivers are what you're looking for. Are you sure you got the drivers for laptops? (they're not the same for desktops)[/quote]

Havng seen some threads about this type of problem before, and without wanting to "hijack" this thread I wonder if we could expand this topic a little since my son soon will be getting a MacBook Pro and I will be is tech suppor and have to deal with this issue.

As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly.

On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?

I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK.

If appropriate I would welcome expanding this topic to include the driver situation when using the Virtual Machine products as well as using BootCamp to get into Windows, as I think this is a common problem currently.
[quote name='filipetolhuizen' post='1063849' date='May 28 2010, 07:00 AM']Bootcamp only helps you to get a NTFS partition on your hard disk and install Windows. It will then run natively like in any other PC, so the nvidia drivers are what you're looking for. Are you sure you got the drivers for laptops? (they're not the same for desktops)



Havng seen some threads about this type of problem before, and without wanting to "hijack" this thread I wonder if we could expand this topic a little since my son soon will be getting a MacBook Pro and I will be is tech suppor and have to deal with this issue.



As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly.



On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?



I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK.



If appropriate I would welcome expanding this topic to include the driver situation when using the Virtual Machine products as well as using BootCamp to get into Windows, as I think this is a common problem currently.

#3
Posted 05/28/2010 05:40 PM   
[quote name='biyahero' post='1063986' date='May 28 2010, 10:40 AM']Havng seen some threads about this type of problem before, and without wanting to "hijack" this thread I wonder if we could expand this topic a little since my son soon will be getting a MacBook Pro and I will be is tech suppor and have to deal with this issue.

As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly.

On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?

I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK.

If appropriate I would welcome expanding this topic to include the driver situation when using the Virtual Machine products as well as using BootCamp to get into Windows, as I think this is a common problem currently.[/quote]

There is nothing we can do when there are no display drivers installed. If any software crashes when no drivers are installed, it is likely not an NVIDIA bug.

"As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly."

Pretty much yes.

"On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?
"

In a virtual environment, the NVIDIA drivers are not communicating directly with the app. The VM client installs it's own drivers which allows the OS to recognize a virtual graphics card. These drivers are very limited in function and won't give you the same performance or features as if you would if you had booted up in Bootcamp. Basically, virtualized OS works best for 2D apps which doesn't require a lot from the graphics card.

"I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK."

This was referring to the NVIDIA Verde display drivers that are available from our website. Apple provides Windows drivers with the Macbook Pro for all of their Windows supported platforms.
[quote name='biyahero' post='1063986' date='May 28 2010, 10:40 AM']Havng seen some threads about this type of problem before, and without wanting to "hijack" this thread I wonder if we could expand this topic a little since my son soon will be getting a MacBook Pro and I will be is tech suppor and have to deal with this issue.



As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly.



On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?



I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK.



If appropriate I would welcome expanding this topic to include the driver situation when using the Virtual Machine products as well as using BootCamp to get into Windows, as I think this is a common problem currently.



There is nothing we can do when there are no display drivers installed. If any software crashes when no drivers are installed, it is likely not an NVIDIA bug.



"As I understand BootCamp... and please correct me if I am mistaken... not only does it help you install an NFTS partition and Windows, it also provides for an enviroment where you can choose whether to boot into Windows OR MacOS and if you choose to boot into Windows you essentialy have a Windows machine so it makes perfect sense that normal Windows drivers should work perfectly."



Pretty much yes.



"On the other hand if you use Parallels or VMware to create a Windows Virtual Machine as many if not most Mac/Windows users seem to prefer so that you can run Windows programs from within the MacOS environment, the driver situation becomes much more murky. Perhaps the original poster's boss is using one of the Virtual Machine programs to run Windows even though it was installed using Boot Camp?

"



In a virtual environment, the NVIDIA drivers are not communicating directly with the app. The VM client installs it's own drivers which allows the OS to recognize a virtual graphics card. These drivers are very limited in function and won't give you the same performance or features as if you would if you had booted up in Bootcamp. Basically, virtualized OS works best for 2D apps which doesn't require a lot from the graphics card.



"I do remember seeing a thread on another forum or an industy newsletter or something where as I recall it said that Apple didn't receive permission from Microsoft in time to include the proper Windows 7 drivers on the Apple OS disk and so if that is where the drivers came from on the machine in queston, that is probably the source of the problem. As I remember this thread I am referring to, the Windows XP drivers on the Apple OS disk are OK, only the Windows 7 drivers are not OK."



This was referring to the NVIDIA Verde display drivers that are available from our website. Apple provides Windows drivers with the Macbook Pro for all of their Windows supported platforms.

Please send me a PM if I fail to keep up on replying in any specific thread or leave a driver feedback: Driver Feedback

#4
Posted 05/28/2010 07:03 PM   
Back to the original discussion, I'm having the same issue - Running Windows 7 64-bit via bootcamp on a Macbook Pro (I7 with 330m), when running the Nvidia update exe, I receive the following error:

>>The Nvidia setup program could not locate any drivers that are compatible with your current hardware. Setup will now exit.

Another interesting note, when I go throught the auto discover process on the Nvidia website (from Windows 7), I receive the following message:

>>The manufacturer of this system requires that you download the driver for your GPU from their support site.

Finally, I did not have this problem when running Windows 7 32-bit on a different Macbook Pro (Core 2 Duo). Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Back to the original discussion, I'm having the same issue - Running Windows 7 64-bit via bootcamp on a Macbook Pro (I7 with 330m), when running the Nvidia update exe, I receive the following error:



>>The Nvidia setup program could not locate any drivers that are compatible with your current hardware. Setup will now exit.



Another interesting note, when I go throught the auto discover process on the Nvidia website (from Windows 7), I receive the following message:



>>The manufacturer of this system requires that you download the driver for your GPU from their support site.



Finally, I did not have this problem when running Windows 7 32-bit on a different Macbook Pro (Core 2 Duo). Any help would be greatly appreciated.

#5
Posted 06/06/2010 03:20 PM   
Apple has not given us permission to support their newest Macbook Pro models with the latest NVIDIA Verde drivers. Our notebook program is an opt in program in that we support notebook models in which the notebook manufacturer has allowed to support because in case the user has to go back to the notebook maker for support, they will be assurred the company will not turn them away for using a driver which they did not themselves release from their website.
Apple has not given us permission to support their newest Macbook Pro models with the latest NVIDIA Verde drivers. Our notebook program is an opt in program in that we support notebook models in which the notebook manufacturer has allowed to support because in case the user has to go back to the notebook maker for support, they will be assurred the company will not turn them away for using a driver which they did not themselves release from their website.

Please send me a PM if I fail to keep up on replying in any specific thread or leave a driver feedback: Driver Feedback

#6
Posted 06/07/2010 08:58 PM   
Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.
Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.

#7
Posted 06/08/2010 10:31 PM   
Download the drivers from Apple. If the notebook GPU isn't part of the Verde program, it's because Apple hasn't chosen to opt in to the program, so NVIDIA can't get a driver to you. The driver will have to come from the notebook manufacturer, Apple.


Amorphous

[quote name='Phenolic' post='1070423' date='Jun 8 2010, 03:31 PM']Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.[/quote]
Download the drivers from Apple. If the notebook GPU isn't part of the Verde program, it's because Apple hasn't chosen to opt in to the program, so NVIDIA can't get a driver to you. The driver will have to come from the notebook manufacturer, Apple.





Amorphous



[quote name='Phenolic' post='1070423' date='Jun 8 2010, 03:31 PM']Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.

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#8
Posted 06/08/2010 10:44 PM   
[quote name='Phenolic' post='1070423' date='Jun 8 2010, 07:31 PM']Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.[/quote]
Try [url="http://www.laptopvideo2go.com/"]here[/url]. The guys over here may have a modified .inf to install the drivers. If not, they'll soon.
[quote name='Phenolic' post='1070423' date='Jun 8 2010, 07:31 PM']Thanks for the good response. It would be nice to know if there is a way around this.

Try here. The guys over here may have a modified .inf to install the drivers. If not, they'll soon.

#9
Posted 06/09/2010 12:27 PM   
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