3D vision glasses charging battery Whats the best way to maintain your glasses battery?
My 3d Vision setup works beautifully, well on most games, Section 8 which is a pretty bad game anyway has too many issues so I play it in 2D but Bioshock 2 is absolutely amazing. I cant see how 3d vision can get much better well except for my one tiny complaint. Areas of smog or dust have bad ghosting but I ignore it till I,m out of that area. Anyway could you please tell me what is the best way of charging the glasses. Is it ok to leave them on charge all the time your PC is on except when playing the game you want them to be wireless. Or should you use them until they are completely flat and then charge them up again? Some rechargeable batteries prefer to be deep cycled but I dont know what type of battery is in the glasses. To get the longest life out of the batteries whats the best way to go? Oh and can they be replaced?
My 3d Vision setup works beautifully, well on most games, Section 8 which is a pretty bad game anyway has too many issues so I play it in 2D but Bioshock 2 is absolutely amazing. I cant see how 3d vision can get much better well except for my one tiny complaint. Areas of smog or dust have bad ghosting but I ignore it till I,m out of that area. Anyway could you please tell me what is the best way of charging the glasses. Is it ok to leave them on charge all the time your PC is on except when playing the game you want them to be wireless. Or should you use them until they are completely flat and then charge them up again? Some rechargeable batteries prefer to be deep cycled but I dont know what type of battery is in the glasses. To get the longest life out of the batteries whats the best way to go? Oh and can they be replaced?

#1
Posted 03/28/2010 12:04 AM   
Don't know 100% for the glasses but I have never heard good things about constantly keeping a rechargable battery plugged. I don't get why you would in the first place, it is not like it has a short lifespan.
Don't know 100% for the glasses but I have never heard good things about constantly keeping a rechargable battery plugged. I don't get why you would in the first place, it is not like it has a short lifespan.

#2
Posted 03/28/2010 01:04 AM   
I have always been under the impression that generally rechargeable batteries are best emptied of power before recharging to full....
so- full, empty, full, empty and so on.....

I simply got that info from the guide to a cellphone i bought... could be wrong tho
I have always been under the impression that generally rechargeable batteries are best emptied of power before recharging to full....

so- full, empty, full, empty and so on.....



I simply got that info from the guide to a cellphone i bought... could be wrong tho

#3
Posted 03/29/2010 12:17 AM   
I have this guide that came with an electric boat, it says:
Ni-Cd: use until almost flat once in a while.
Ni-Mh: use until almost flat once in a while.
Lead: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.
Li-ion: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.
rechargeable batteries should be stored in charged condition.
I don't know what kind is in the glasses though.
I have this guide that came with an electric boat, it says:

Ni-Cd: use until almost flat once in a while.

Ni-Mh: use until almost flat once in a while.

Lead: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.

Li-ion: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.

rechargeable batteries should be stored in charged condition.

I don't know what kind is in the glasses though.

#4
Posted 03/29/2010 12:35 AM   
[quote name='Freke1' post='1029213' date='Mar 29 2010, 11:35 AM']I have this guide that came with an electric boat, it says:
Ni-Cd: use until almost flat once in a while.
Ni-Mh: use until almost flat once in a while.
Lead: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.
Li-ion: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.
rechargeable batteries should be stored in charged condition.
I don't know what kind is in the glasses though.[/quote]

Li-ion. [url="http://3dvision-blog.com/3d-vision-glasses-might-have-a-battery-charging-issue/"]Apparently[/url].
[quote name='Freke1' post='1029213' date='Mar 29 2010, 11:35 AM']I have this guide that came with an electric boat, it says:

Ni-Cd: use until almost flat once in a while.

Ni-Mh: use until almost flat once in a while.

Lead: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.

Li-ion: recharge after every use and don't use until almost flat.

rechargeable batteries should be stored in charged condition.

I don't know what kind is in the glasses though.



Li-ion. Apparently.

#5
Posted 03/29/2010 12:42 AM   
[quote name='EmmSqd' post='1029215' date='Mar 29 2010, 01:42 PM']Li-ion. [url="http://3dvision-blog.com/3d-vision-glasses-might-have-a-battery-charging-issue/"]Apparently[/url].[/quote]

Time for me to change tact then!!! :)
[quote name='EmmSqd' post='1029215' date='Mar 29 2010, 01:42 PM']Li-ion. Apparently.



Time for me to change tact then!!! :)

#6
Posted 03/29/2010 04:40 AM   
Dont know about you but when a red light flashes i plug them in until they are fully charged
Dont know about you but when a red light flashes i plug them in until they are fully charged

#7
Posted 03/29/2010 07:37 AM   
Aparently it is ok to keep them topped up so leave them charging whenever you arent playing a game. Once a month let them go perfectly flat, IE: red light flashing, then fully recharge them. This is what I seem to understand about Li-on batteries after a bit of Google research. Can someone confirm this please and I still dont know if you can replace the battery or not.
Aparently it is ok to keep them topped up so leave them charging whenever you arent playing a game. Once a month let them go perfectly flat, IE: red light flashing, then fully recharge them. This is what I seem to understand about Li-on batteries after a bit of Google research. Can someone confirm this please and I still dont know if you can replace the battery or not.

#8
Posted 03/29/2010 10:26 AM   
It depends on the design technology of the battery..

Lithium-Ion batteries should be kept on the charger at all times [b]or [/b]removed from the device for maximum lifespan.. Leaving it in the device with the possibility of the device trickle-discharging it is not good because it wastes charge/discharge cycles.. The major killer to look out for with Li-Ion batteries is simply the number of charge cycles.. The more you charge and discharge the battery, the weaker it gets and the less capacity the battery will hold..

For Nickle-Cadmium batteries, you absolutely NEED to do one full charge/discharge cycle on a monthly basis.. These batteries behave the opposite of Li-ion in that the more you exercise them, the longer they'll last.. If you let Ni-Cads sit on the shelf too long, their chemicals will separate and dry out.. Bringing them back to life will be difficult.. Usually you need to shock them with a strong current to get them to even take a charge once they get screwed up..

Lead-Acid- Need to be fully charged at all times.. The deeper you discharge them, the more wear and tear you're doing to them..

Nickle Metal Hydride - These are the least picky of all the battery technologies.. They don't hold anywhere near as much power for their weight as Li-Ion batteries do, and you need a lot more of them to power the same type of devices.. The only thing you have to look out for with Ni-MH batteries is that they will automatically discharge quite rapidly.. Losing 20% or more of their charge in a month.. If the battery gets too discharged, it may refuse to accept a charge..


[quote name='CamRaiD' post='1029205' date='Mar 28 2010, 08:17 PM']I have always been under the impression that generally rechargeable batteries are best emptied of power before recharging to full....
so- full, empty, full, empty and so on.....

I simply got that info from the guide to a cellphone i bought... could be wrong tho[/quote]
The only reason they tell you to do that with Li-Ion batteries is so that the "remaining power" indicator will be accurate.. In reality, as far as the battery is concerned, it doesn't matter if you charge to full or not.. The battery will always know when it's "full" but it might not know how much it's current capacity is.. By discharging it completely, the battery will "learn" it's current capacity and be able to accurately report it's available power to the device.. You see, the problem with modern battery technology is that they're "too good".. They'll output full power right up until they're exhausted and then they'll immediately shut off with ltitle to no warning. That's why electronics are built into batteries now to provide estimates on your battery capacity.. If you don't discharge fully, then the battery indicator can be WAY off.. Showing a full charge for 50 hours and then having the battery completely die on you the next hour.. In the olden days batteries were so bad that the more they were discharged, the less power they were capable of outputting at any one second.. So all you had to do is measure the output force and know how much power the battery had inside.. Again, modern batts have full 100% output power right up until the last second they die which is necessary for today's high powered devices.

The recommendation to power cycle Li-Ion is only for accurate feedback to the user.. Using the Li-Ion battery excessively, especially when not needed, is how you wear you a Li-ion..
It depends on the design technology of the battery..



Lithium-Ion batteries should be kept on the charger at all times or removed from the device for maximum lifespan.. Leaving it in the device with the possibility of the device trickle-discharging it is not good because it wastes charge/discharge cycles.. The major killer to look out for with Li-Ion batteries is simply the number of charge cycles.. The more you charge and discharge the battery, the weaker it gets and the less capacity the battery will hold..



For Nickle-Cadmium batteries, you absolutely NEED to do one full charge/discharge cycle on a monthly basis.. These batteries behave the opposite of Li-ion in that the more you exercise them, the longer they'll last.. If you let Ni-Cads sit on the shelf too long, their chemicals will separate and dry out.. Bringing them back to life will be difficult.. Usually you need to shock them with a strong current to get them to even take a charge once they get screwed up..



Lead-Acid- Need to be fully charged at all times.. The deeper you discharge them, the more wear and tear you're doing to them..



Nickle Metal Hydride - These are the least picky of all the battery technologies.. They don't hold anywhere near as much power for their weight as Li-Ion batteries do, and you need a lot more of them to power the same type of devices.. The only thing you have to look out for with Ni-MH batteries is that they will automatically discharge quite rapidly.. Losing 20% or more of their charge in a month.. If the battery gets too discharged, it may refuse to accept a charge..





[quote name='CamRaiD' post='1029205' date='Mar 28 2010, 08:17 PM']I have always been under the impression that generally rechargeable batteries are best emptied of power before recharging to full....

so- full, empty, full, empty and so on.....



I simply got that info from the guide to a cellphone i bought... could be wrong tho

The only reason they tell you to do that with Li-Ion batteries is so that the "remaining power" indicator will be accurate.. In reality, as far as the battery is concerned, it doesn't matter if you charge to full or not.. The battery will always know when it's "full" but it might not know how much it's current capacity is.. By discharging it completely, the battery will "learn" it's current capacity and be able to accurately report it's available power to the device.. You see, the problem with modern battery technology is that they're "too good".. They'll output full power right up until they're exhausted and then they'll immediately shut off with ltitle to no warning. That's why electronics are built into batteries now to provide estimates on your battery capacity.. If you don't discharge fully, then the battery indicator can be WAY off.. Showing a full charge for 50 hours and then having the battery completely die on you the next hour.. In the olden days batteries were so bad that the more they were discharged, the less power they were capable of outputting at any one second.. So all you had to do is measure the output force and know how much power the battery had inside.. Again, modern batts have full 100% output power right up until the last second they die which is necessary for today's high powered devices.



The recommendation to power cycle Li-Ion is only for accurate feedback to the user.. Using the Li-Ion battery excessively, especially when not needed, is how you wear you a Li-ion..

#9
Posted 03/29/2010 02:19 PM   
[quote name='ratcat' post='1029446' date='Mar 29 2010, 09:26 PM']I still dont know if you can replace the battery or not.[/quote]

If you check the linked article earlier in the thread, you can see clearly that the battery pack is modular & appears to be completely replaceable...tricky part will be finding the correct module.
[quote name='ratcat' post='1029446' date='Mar 29 2010, 09:26 PM']I still dont know if you can replace the battery or not.



If you check the linked article earlier in the thread, you can see clearly that the battery pack is modular & appears to be completely replaceable...tricky part will be finding the correct module.

#10
Posted 03/29/2010 11:06 PM   
My glasses blink red then go out immediately. So they must not know their current current... lol Thats when I have been recharging them although I have only recharged them three times since I,ve bought them, up until recently when I just left them plugged in to the usb cable. I give them quite a workout. Just finished BIOshock 2 and waiting for Metro 2033 to arrive. Anyone tried Metro 2033 with 3D?
My glasses blink red then go out immediately. So they must not know their current current... lol Thats when I have been recharging them although I have only recharged them three times since I,ve bought them, up until recently when I just left them plugged in to the usb cable. I give them quite a workout. Just finished BIOshock 2 and waiting for Metro 2033 to arrive. Anyone tried Metro 2033 with 3D?

#11
Posted 03/31/2010 10:57 AM   
Hi

we have an FAQ on optimizing battery life!

[url="http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=2286&p_created=1226431803&p_sid=EUuU*eYj&p_accessibility=0&p_redirect=&p_srch=1&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX3Jvd19jbnQ9Niw2JnBfcHJvZHM9MTMyJnBfY2F0cz0wJnBfcHY9MS4xMzImcF9jdj0mcF9zZWFyY2hfdHlwZT1hbnN3ZXJzLnNlYXJjaF9ubCZwX3BhZ2U9MSZwX3NlYXJjaF90ZXh0PWJhdHRlcnk!&p_li=&p_topview=1"]http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia....amp;p_topview=1[/url]
Hi



we have an FAQ on optimizing battery life!



http://nvidia.custhelp.com/cgi-bin/nvidia....amp;p_topview=1

#12
Posted 03/31/2010 05:01 PM   
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