Low fps in World of Warcraft
Hi, for the past few years I've been dealing with fps problems in Wow. I recently bought a new graphics card, a Gtx 275 (upgrading from a 9600 GT) and thought that it might fix the problem or at least alleviate it. Before I upgraded, I got around 20 fps average with all settings at max and right now I'm only getting 25. If I'm in a major city it goes down even more to about 15 fps and if I'm staring at a black wall when no one is around I can get up to 35fps. Ive looked online at other posts but I could not find a fix pertaining to my problem.
My specs are:
Windows XP Professional, SP3
AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor 4200+
2.20 GHZ., 2.00 GB of Ram
GeForce Gtx 275
PSU=575 watts
Abit NF-M2 nview motherboard
I am running Dualview w/ two moniters, 1920x1080 and 1280x1024

I have checked for all of the latest drivers and tried defragging my drives/pagefile/registry. I am running at less than 100 latency at all times too. The interesting thing is, I can play games like Crysis at 45fps fine on the highest settings. Does anyone have any ideas of why WoW is having such a problem? Thanks.
Hi, for the past few years I've been dealing with fps problems in Wow. I recently bought a new graphics card, a Gtx 275 (upgrading from a 9600 GT) and thought that it might fix the problem or at least alleviate it. Before I upgraded, I got around 20 fps average with all settings at max and right now I'm only getting 25. If I'm in a major city it goes down even more to about 15 fps and if I'm staring at a black wall when no one is around I can get up to 35fps. Ive looked online at other posts but I could not find a fix pertaining to my problem.

My specs are:

Windows XP Professional, SP3

AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor 4200+

2.20 GHZ., 2.00 GB of Ram

GeForce Gtx 275

PSU=575 watts

Abit NF-M2 nview motherboard

I am running Dualview w/ two moniters, 1920x1080 and 1280x1024



I have checked for all of the latest drivers and tried defragging my drives/pagefile/registry. I am running at less than 100 latency at all times too. The interesting thing is, I can play games like Crysis at 45fps fine on the highest settings. Does anyone have any ideas of why WoW is having such a problem? Thanks.

#1
Posted 02/25/2010 09:12 PM   
WOW is a CPU limited game meaning it rely's upon the speed of your CPU to feed the info to the GPU. And with the CPU you have and the speed its running at is your biggest limiting factor. So no matter what you do GPU wise your frame rates just are not going to improve much in games that rely heavily upon the CPU.

Look at it like this. Your system is only as fast as its slowest sub system and thats your CPU. So no matter what you try you will be limited by the processing power and speed of your CPU.

Also your internet connection can severly limit you as well. Traffic on the server you are playing on, many things can effect your game play in WOW.
WOW is a CPU limited game meaning it rely's upon the speed of your CPU to feed the info to the GPU. And with the CPU you have and the speed its running at is your biggest limiting factor. So no matter what you do GPU wise your frame rates just are not going to improve much in games that rely heavily upon the CPU.



Look at it like this. Your system is only as fast as its slowest sub system and thats your CPU. So no matter what you try you will be limited by the processing power and speed of your CPU.



Also your internet connection can severly limit you as well. Traffic on the server you are playing on, many things can effect your game play in WOW.

In Memory Of Chris Arthington "One Cool Cat"

#2
Posted 02/25/2010 09:20 PM   
Thanks for the quick response, so my CPU is holding me down? I have a wired internet connection with 25mbps downloading and 15 uploading. As for traffic on the server end, even when I log on at a less-populated time I don't get good fps.
Thanks for the quick response, so my CPU is holding me down? I have a wired internet connection with 25mbps downloading and 15 uploading. As for traffic on the server end, even when I log on at a less-populated time I don't get good fps.

#3
Posted 02/25/2010 09:26 PM   
Then your CPU is definatly whats holding you back. Its just a simple case of your thruput not being high enough. In an ideal situation tuning your PC so the slowest component is the GPU works best for performance. This is done by overclocking the other hardware in your PC.

But to tell you the truth I believe upgrading your mobo and CPU would give you the power you are looking for.
Then your CPU is definatly whats holding you back. Its just a simple case of your thruput not being high enough. In an ideal situation tuning your PC so the slowest component is the GPU works best for performance. This is done by overclocking the other hardware in your PC.



But to tell you the truth I believe upgrading your mobo and CPU would give you the power you are looking for.

In Memory Of Chris Arthington "One Cool Cat"

#4
Posted 02/25/2010 09:33 PM   
Without spending the money to buy a new motherboard and processor, do you think an AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+ Brisbane 2.9GHz would be enough to play WoW at a high fps? (It's the best I can get w/out upgrading the mobo) Or do I just need to scrap them both?
Without spending the money to buy a new motherboard and processor, do you think an AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+ Brisbane 2.9GHz would be enough to play WoW at a high fps? (It's the best I can get w/out upgrading the mobo) Or do I just need to scrap them both?

#5
Posted 02/25/2010 09:40 PM   
Allow me to preface this post with the body of another that focuses on this very issue:

[quote]...This is, for lack of a better word, "normal" behavior. In raid and raid-like environments (densely-populated cities, Wintergrasp during peak hours, etc.,) system performance is heavily contingent on CPU and networking throughput. In these conditions, graphics performance is limited to the CPU's capacity to prepare and transmit relevant frame data to the graphics subsystem on a frame-by-frame basis; this is known as CPU bottlenecking. Increasing the effective graphics throughput (enabling SLI and/or overclocking domain frequencies) will not yield appreciable or marginal additional performance due to the GPU(s) being forced to wait of new instruction sets from the CPU. In other words, your single graphics card alone is drawing a given frame faster than the CPU can prepare the next one, and introducing additional GPUs isn't alleviating the issue but only adding to it.

Fixing the problem is a matter of increasing your processor's capabilities - that means overclocking, or a new processor if you'd rather throw money at the problem than understand it. Increasing your processor's clock speed allows it to perform more calculations per second, decreasing the time between data sets being sent to the graphics subsystem, which means more consistent performance. Do understand that World of Warcraft is a mixed bag of CPU- and GPU-limited environments, and performance gains may be more noticeable in some more than others. For example, overclocking your CPU will boost your performance in large cities and raids but likely not to the same extent in visually intensive scenes like flying in Grizzly Hills. On the other side of that, enabling SLI will boost performance in those graphics-heavy scenes but won't help in CPU-limited instances (as you now know.)[/quote]

Now, since the Athlon 64s aren't extremely flexible overclockers and because I don't find the recommendation of throwing money at your problems to fix them to be feasible until all other options have been exhausted, there will need to be a fair bit of experimentation on your end in terms of graphics options before you will be able to strike a fitting balance in subsystem workloads. Overclocking aside, you'll want to keep your GPU busy without overworking it; force a high anti-aliasing rate (you can do this through the NVIDIA Control Panel or in the "Video" section under "Multisampling,") turn all of the visual settings as high as they can go EXCLUDING the shadow detail (this should be one notch below max at best; "Ultra" allows overlapping extrusions which can be murder on the soft pixel pipeline,) and never run the program in windowed mode unless you're frequently alt+tabbing out. Don't be afraid to play around with the settings in the NVIDIA Control Panel either - setting the prerender limit to 8, for example, may increase your performance. For explanations on what the various NVCP components do, look [url="http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?s=&showtopic=158727&view=findpost&p=995515"]here[/url].
Allow me to preface this post with the body of another that focuses on this very issue:



...This is, for lack of a better word, "normal" behavior. In raid and raid-like environments (densely-populated cities, Wintergrasp during peak hours, etc.,) system performance is heavily contingent on CPU and networking throughput. In these conditions, graphics performance is limited to the CPU's capacity to prepare and transmit relevant frame data to the graphics subsystem on a frame-by-frame basis; this is known as CPU bottlenecking. Increasing the effective graphics throughput (enabling SLI and/or overclocking domain frequencies) will not yield appreciable or marginal additional performance due to the GPU(s) being forced to wait of new instruction sets from the CPU. In other words, your single graphics card alone is drawing a given frame faster than the CPU can prepare the next one, and introducing additional GPUs isn't alleviating the issue but only adding to it.



Fixing the problem is a matter of increasing your processor's capabilities - that means overclocking, or a new processor if you'd rather throw money at the problem than understand it. Increasing your processor's clock speed allows it to perform more calculations per second, decreasing the time between data sets being sent to the graphics subsystem, which means more consistent performance. Do understand that World of Warcraft is a mixed bag of CPU- and GPU-limited environments, and performance gains may be more noticeable in some more than others. For example, overclocking your CPU will boost your performance in large cities and raids but likely not to the same extent in visually intensive scenes like flying in Grizzly Hills. On the other side of that, enabling SLI will boost performance in those graphics-heavy scenes but won't help in CPU-limited instances (as you now know.)




Now, since the Athlon 64s aren't extremely flexible overclockers and because I don't find the recommendation of throwing money at your problems to fix them to be feasible until all other options have been exhausted, there will need to be a fair bit of experimentation on your end in terms of graphics options before you will be able to strike a fitting balance in subsystem workloads. Overclocking aside, you'll want to keep your GPU busy without overworking it; force a high anti-aliasing rate (you can do this through the NVIDIA Control Panel or in the "Video" section under "Multisampling,") turn all of the visual settings as high as they can go EXCLUDING the shadow detail (this should be one notch below max at best; "Ultra" allows overlapping extrusions which can be murder on the soft pixel pipeline,) and never run the program in windowed mode unless you're frequently alt+tabbing out. Don't be afraid to play around with the settings in the NVIDIA Control Panel either - setting the prerender limit to 8, for example, may increase your performance. For explanations on what the various NVCP components do, look here.

GeForce Technical Marketing

#6
Posted 02/25/2010 09:42 PM   
Edit :

I will step aside and allow the WOW guru to take the stage.


The puppy mod is way better at this topic than I.
Edit :



I will step aside and allow the WOW guru to take the stage.





The puppy mod is way better at this topic than I.

In Memory Of Chris Arthington "One Cool Cat"

#7
Posted 02/25/2010 09:43 PM   
After experimenting with the values in the nvidia control panel and puting AA on 16xQ and a maximum of 8 pre-rendered frames, I got a surprising jump of about 20 fps. Thanks for the help.
After experimenting with the values in the nvidia control panel and puting AA on 16xQ and a maximum of 8 pre-rendered frames, I got a surprising jump of about 20 fps. Thanks for the help.

#8
Posted 02/25/2010 10:11 PM   
[quote name='Justin7771' post='1008054' date='Feb 25 2010, 09:12 PM']Hi, for the past few years I've been dealing with fps problems in Wow. I recently bought a new graphics card, a Gtx 275 (upgrading from a 9600 GT) and thought that it might fix the problem or at least alleviate it. Before I upgraded, I got around 20 fps average with all settings at max and right now I'm only getting 25. If I'm in a major city it goes down even more to about 15 fps and if I'm staring at a black wall when no one is around I can get up to 35fps. Ive looked online at other posts but I could not find a fix pertaining to my problem.
My specs are:
Windows XP Professional, SP3
AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor 4200+
2.20 GHZ., 2.00 GB of Ram
GeForce Gtx 275
PSU=575 watts
Abit NF-M2 nview motherboard
I am running Dualview w/ two moniters, 1920x1080 and 1280x1024

I have checked for all of the latest drivers and tried defragging my drives/pagefile/registry. I am running at less than 100 latency at all times too. The interesting thing is, I can play games like Crysis at 45fps fine on the highest settings. Does anyone have any ideas of why WoW is having such a problem? Thanks.[/quote]

Don't rush to buy new hardware if it is only WoW that you are going to play. The increase in performance is very low so that it's not really worth it. Here is my experience.

I used to play wow on a 9800gx2 card with quad core intell processor 2.2 Ghz, 4 gig RAM at 1680x1050. With most settings at max (not everything because some things like particle effects and shadows used to lag my system so I kept them low) my fps was around 50-60 in the wild and dropped to 30-40 in places like Dalaran. And in raids I had to turn down my settings because my frame rate would drop to like 20 fps. In raids with 4-5 Deathnights spaming icy touch my fps could even drop to single digits so that I even had to turn off particle/spell effects alltogether.

Now I have intell core i7 975 @3.3Ghz, 2x gtx295, 6 gig DDR3 RAM, ASUS P6T7 motherboard, which is a very powerful system for any contemprary games. But believe it or not I am still getting massive fps drops at max settings in raids and cities. The total increase I gained with this new system is about +5 fps. Which is funny (there is a difference though that now I play at 1920x1200 but still).

The main problem with WoW is that the game engine is very outdated. It is just not designed to use all the modern features of the newest hardware. I doubt there is a system in the market which can play WoW with ALL settings maxed out at 60 fps in any circumstances.
[quote name='Justin7771' post='1008054' date='Feb 25 2010, 09:12 PM']Hi, for the past few years I've been dealing with fps problems in Wow. I recently bought a new graphics card, a Gtx 275 (upgrading from a 9600 GT) and thought that it might fix the problem or at least alleviate it. Before I upgraded, I got around 20 fps average with all settings at max and right now I'm only getting 25. If I'm in a major city it goes down even more to about 15 fps and if I'm staring at a black wall when no one is around I can get up to 35fps. Ive looked online at other posts but I could not find a fix pertaining to my problem.

My specs are:

Windows XP Professional, SP3

AMD Athlon 64 x2 Dual Core Processor 4200+

2.20 GHZ., 2.00 GB of Ram

GeForce Gtx 275

PSU=575 watts

Abit NF-M2 nview motherboard

I am running Dualview w/ two moniters, 1920x1080 and 1280x1024



I have checked for all of the latest drivers and tried defragging my drives/pagefile/registry. I am running at less than 100 latency at all times too. The interesting thing is, I can play games like Crysis at 45fps fine on the highest settings. Does anyone have any ideas of why WoW is having such a problem? Thanks.



Don't rush to buy new hardware if it is only WoW that you are going to play. The increase in performance is very low so that it's not really worth it. Here is my experience.



I used to play wow on a 9800gx2 card with quad core intell processor 2.2 Ghz, 4 gig RAM at 1680x1050. With most settings at max (not everything because some things like particle effects and shadows used to lag my system so I kept them low) my fps was around 50-60 in the wild and dropped to 30-40 in places like Dalaran. And in raids I had to turn down my settings because my frame rate would drop to like 20 fps. In raids with 4-5 Deathnights spaming icy touch my fps could even drop to single digits so that I even had to turn off particle/spell effects alltogether.



Now I have intell core i7 975 @3.3Ghz, 2x gtx295, 6 gig DDR3 RAM, ASUS P6T7 motherboard, which is a very powerful system for any contemprary games. But believe it or not I am still getting massive fps drops at max settings in raids and cities. The total increase I gained with this new system is about +5 fps. Which is funny (there is a difference though that now I play at 1920x1200 but still).



The main problem with WoW is that the game engine is very outdated. It is just not designed to use all the modern features of the newest hardware. I doubt there is a system in the market which can play WoW with ALL settings maxed out at 60 fps in any circumstances.

#9
Posted 02/25/2010 10:16 PM   
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