Nvidia ION connecting NetBox to TV via HDMI - no video or sound edid & config issues
Hi - I have a Foxconn NetBox nT330i which uses NVidia ION graphics card. Running Ubuntu Linux with the NVidia proprierty drivers. Works fine when setup via DVI on my PC monitor but can't get it to display when I plug in HDMI to HDMI into my Panasonic TX-32LXD700 LCD TV. From some research this appears to be related to the edid settings the TV sends to the Nvidia driver over HDMI - anyone got any advice - I really need to connect via HDMI as this is a media server for playing HD movies. Thanks.
Hi - I have a Foxconn NetBox nT330i which uses NVidia ION graphics card. Running Ubuntu Linux with the NVidia proprierty drivers. Works fine when setup via DVI on my PC monitor but can't get it to display when I plug in HDMI to HDMI into my Panasonic TX-32LXD700 LCD TV. From some research this appears to be related to the edid settings the TV sends to the Nvidia driver over HDMI - anyone got any advice - I really need to connect via HDMI as this is a media server for playing HD movies. Thanks.

#1
Posted 02/25/2010 11:38 AM   
[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1007793' date='Feb 25 2010, 05:38 AM']Hi - I have a Foxconn NetBox nT330i which uses NVidia ION graphics card. Running Ubuntu Linux with the NVidia proprierty drivers. Works fine when setup via DVI on my PC monitor but can't get it to display when I plug in HDMI to HDMI into my Panasonic TX-32LXD700 LCD TV. From some research this appears to be related to the edid settings the TV sends to the Nvidia driver over HDMI - anyone got any advice - I really need to connect via HDMI as this is a media server for playing HD movies. Thanks.[/quote]

Here is a link to a Ubuntu fix for this type of problem: [url="https://wiki.ubuntu.com/X/Config/HDMI"]Link[/url]

Out of curiosity though, what kind of HD movies do you plan to play back? Linux currently doesn't support Blu-Ray formats, which is why I went with Windows 7 myself. I mean, sure, you can get a blu-ray rip that is re-encoded or some such, but not without some kind of quality loss. Couple that with the fact that Windows 7 "just works" with the drivers/TV's/media, it just seems like the way to go. Keep in mind that when I say that I too am an avid Linux fan, but Windows is just the right tool for that kind of job for 99% of people.
[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1007793' date='Feb 25 2010, 05:38 AM']Hi - I have a Foxconn NetBox nT330i which uses NVidia ION graphics card. Running Ubuntu Linux with the NVidia proprierty drivers. Works fine when setup via DVI on my PC monitor but can't get it to display when I plug in HDMI to HDMI into my Panasonic TX-32LXD700 LCD TV. From some research this appears to be related to the edid settings the TV sends to the Nvidia driver over HDMI - anyone got any advice - I really need to connect via HDMI as this is a media server for playing HD movies. Thanks.



Here is a link to a Ubuntu fix for this type of problem: Link



Out of curiosity though, what kind of HD movies do you plan to play back? Linux currently doesn't support Blu-Ray formats, which is why I went with Windows 7 myself. I mean, sure, you can get a blu-ray rip that is re-encoded or some such, but not without some kind of quality loss. Couple that with the fact that Windows 7 "just works" with the drivers/TV's/media, it just seems like the way to go. Keep in mind that when I say that I too am an avid Linux fan, but Windows is just the right tool for that kind of job for 99% of people.

#2
Posted 02/25/2010 09:20 PM   
Why use linux? Because it's free. A linux system is much more than enough to just watch movies on your tv and you don't have to pay for it...

nbennett1970:
The solution to your problem is to use the "IgnoreEDID" "true" option in your xorg.conf file. If you stil get no sound or audio try to disable "Force full GPU scaling" in the NVIDIA X Server settings panel. After that both audio and video should work.
Why use linux? Because it's free. A linux system is much more than enough to just watch movies on your tv and you don't have to pay for it...



nbennett1970:

The solution to your problem is to use the "IgnoreEDID" "true" option in your xorg.conf file. If you stil get no sound or audio try to disable "Force full GPU scaling" in the NVIDIA X Server settings panel. After that both audio and video should work.

#3
Posted 02/25/2010 09:41 PM   
[quote name='Nyebi' post='1008077' date='Feb 25 2010, 03:41 PM']Why use linux? Because it's free. A linux system is much more than enough to just watch movies on your tv and you don't have to pay for it...[/quote]

But that's the thing... if you have a blu-ray reader, you can't stick it in a linux box and use it to watch a blu-ray. Nor can you copy a blu-ray straight to hard disk and play the ISO in Linux, playback is simply unsupported. Again, you can re-encode everything as a hack around the issue, but that takes a [b]lot[/b] of time and (critically) looses quality... and in the end there is a point where your time is simply worth more than the cost of a basic copy of Windows.

Just to reiterate though, I am a Linux fan (I took this particular handle from a Debian distro), I just want to make sure people know about this when building an HTPC as it's a snag most people don't know about.
[quote name='Nyebi' post='1008077' date='Feb 25 2010, 03:41 PM']Why use linux? Because it's free. A linux system is much more than enough to just watch movies on your tv and you don't have to pay for it...



But that's the thing... if you have a blu-ray reader, you can't stick it in a linux box and use it to watch a blu-ray. Nor can you copy a blu-ray straight to hard disk and play the ISO in Linux, playback is simply unsupported. Again, you can re-encode everything as a hack around the issue, but that takes a lot of time and (critically) looses quality... and in the end there is a point where your time is simply worth more than the cost of a basic copy of Windows.



Just to reiterate though, I am a Linux fan (I took this particular handle from a Debian distro), I just want to make sure people know about this when building an HTPC as it's a snag most people don't know about.

#4
Posted 02/25/2010 10:14 PM   
[quote name='Etch' post='1008108' date='Feb 25 2010, 10:14 PM']But that's the thing... if you have a blu-ray reader, you can't stick it in a linux box and use it to watch a blu-ray. Nor can you copy a blu-ray straight to hard disk and play the ISO in Linux, playback is simply unsupported. Again, you can re-encode everything as a hack around the issue, but that takes a [b]lot[/b] of time and (critically) looses quality... and in the end there is a point where your time is simply worth more than the cost of a basic copy of Windows.

Just to reiterate though, I am a Linux fan (I took this particular handle from a Debian distro), I just want to make sure people know about this when building an HTPC as it's a snag most people don't know about.[/quote]

Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.

I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).

Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.
[quote name='Etch' post='1008108' date='Feb 25 2010, 10:14 PM']But that's the thing... if you have a blu-ray reader, you can't stick it in a linux box and use it to watch a blu-ray. Nor can you copy a blu-ray straight to hard disk and play the ISO in Linux, playback is simply unsupported. Again, you can re-encode everything as a hack around the issue, but that takes a lot of time and (critically) looses quality... and in the end there is a point where your time is simply worth more than the cost of a basic copy of Windows.



Just to reiterate though, I am a Linux fan (I took this particular handle from a Debian distro), I just want to make sure people know about this when building an HTPC as it's a snag most people don't know about.



Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.



I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).



Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.

#5
Posted 02/26/2010 05:08 PM   
I've personally run Windows 7 on the similar Zotac Atom 330 + ION combo. It runs like a dream and HDMI audio and video worked during Windows setup through HDMI, no extra configuration needed.


Amorphous

[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1008508' date='Feb 26 2010, 09:08 AM']Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.

I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).

Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.[/quote]
I've personally run Windows 7 on the similar Zotac Atom 330 + ION combo. It runs like a dream and HDMI audio and video worked during Windows setup through HDMI, no extra configuration needed.





Amorphous



[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1008508' date='Feb 26 2010, 09:08 AM']Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.



I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).



Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.

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#6
Posted 02/26/2010 07:26 PM   
[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1008508' date='Feb 26 2010, 11:08 AM']Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.

I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).

Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.[/quote]

I'm not sure whether MKV is lossless or not (I didn't think there were any truly lossless conversions out there, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's 98% lossless, which is for all intents and purposes identical for the human eye), but I don't believe the MKV container can support HD audio. I think you can hack around it by converting audio to FLAC or something first separately, just a heads up on that.
[quote name='nbennett1970' post='1008508' date='Feb 26 2010, 11:08 AM']Thanks guys - think I'm nearly there - actually have a picture on the TV now, and think sound is close too! I'll post my findings once finalised.



I am ripping Blu-ray and then using MakeMKV to play via XBMC from my understanding this will not lose any quality (files are still around 20GB!).



Reason I chose Linux (apart from being free) was that I wanted something that was not too resource intensive and very stable - last thing I want is the 'blue screen of death' as I want this to be as close to an appliance as I can make it so the family can use it easily. Also fancied the challenge as I'm a newbie to Linux.



I'm not sure whether MKV is lossless or not (I didn't think there were any truly lossless conversions out there, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's 98% lossless, which is for all intents and purposes identical for the human eye), but I don't believe the MKV container can support HD audio. I think you can hack around it by converting audio to FLAC or something first separately, just a heads up on that.

#7
Posted 02/27/2010 03:23 AM   
Guys, please help! /confused.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':confused:' /> After endless search I`ve found this topic.
I`ve just bought an Acer Revo 360 and I don`t enjoy the "plug& play" on my Sony KDL P40 2530.

No image, no sound no nothing. I can only have image on PC cable. (running its says native @1024*768 60hz)

I`m running Win 7 so the solution for ubuntu doesn`t help me.

What to do? (please note that I have no other monitor available)

Oddly the dvd player that used to run on the very HDMI cable did it at 560, 720, 1080i @50hz. If I were to select 1080p (which obviously my TV doesn`t support) I would get the same "effect" as on the Revo.

PS: I have the latest nvidia drivers from windows update and I`ve also checked my other HDMI TV port with the same result. (i don`t have a DVI port)
Also each time I plug in the HDMI cable in Revo I get on the TV screen (on the PC mode) just the wallpaper. If I plug out the HDMI then I`m back with the "good" picture on the PC cable.
If I pull out the PC cable and leave only HDMI I see nothing and can`t do a thing. (like tinkering with the advanced settings in Nvidia control panel)
Guys, please help! /confused.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':confused:' /> After endless search I`ve found this topic.

I`ve just bought an Acer Revo 360 and I don`t enjoy the "plug& play" on my Sony KDL P40 2530.



No image, no sound no nothing. I can only have image on PC cable. (running its says native @1024*768 60hz)



I`m running Win 7 so the solution for ubuntu doesn`t help me.



What to do? (please note that I have no other monitor available)



Oddly the dvd player that used to run on the very HDMI cable did it at 560, 720, 1080i @50hz. If I were to select 1080p (which obviously my TV doesn`t support) I would get the same "effect" as on the Revo.



PS: I have the latest nvidia drivers from windows update and I`ve also checked my other HDMI TV port with the same result. (i don`t have a DVI port)

Also each time I plug in the HDMI cable in Revo I get on the TV screen (on the PC mode) just the wallpaper. If I plug out the HDMI then I`m back with the "good" picture on the PC cable.

If I pull out the PC cable and leave only HDMI I see nothing and can`t do a thing. (like tinkering with the advanced settings in Nvidia control panel)

#8
Posted 05/29/2010 12:14 PM   
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