Watercooling Guide for Beginners Watercooling watered down
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[color="#48D1CC"][center]********************[font="Arial Black"]StAndrew (Chris)�s Unofficial Watercooling guide:[/font]********************[/center][/color]

[u][b]***Note: READ FIRST*** Each section of this guide has links to applicable reviews, etc... Everytime I come across a helpful review or comparison (ie CPU block comparison/review), I place it in the appropriate section of this guide. Further, I have all reviews consolidated at the end of this guide for a quick look. Also included are websites for purchasing parts, other watercooling guides, and anything else I feel is important. Anyone who reads through this guide should never have to make vague posts or questions such as: "where do I get parts," "what parts should I get," "Im a noob needing help," etc... Reading this guide and reviewing the links should allow even the most novice user to get a good idea on what they need and where to get it. That way they can formulate more of a narrow request/question that is easier to answer. Unfortunately, vague questions as mentioned above, will most likely get jumped upon by over opinionated users (fanboys), or users with more enthusiasm than knowledge, and can lead towards even more confusion. Watercooling is not hard or "elite" as long as you take the right approach. [/b][/u]

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Basic parts:[/b][/u][/color]
-Pump
-Reservoir/T-Line
-Radiator
-Tubing
-Blocks
*CPU Blocks
*GPU Blocks
*NB/SB Blocks

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Bleed:[/b] [/u][/color]
To fill the tubes of your system once assembled. This can be very difficult to do if you dont take the necessary precautions noted below. In short, if you are using a reservoir, it should be one of the highest, if not, the highest positioned component in your loop (if you have a "tall" reservoir, as long as the top is higher than the rest of the loop, bleeding is made very simple). If you have a T-Line, I usually position mine directly by the pump intake. Its very difficult to bleed with a T-line but there are ways to make it easier. I usually disconnect the fitting located highest in the loop and start filling the T-Line, allowing the loop to fill up to the disconnected fitting. I then re-attach the fitting and end up with more than half of my loop bled. Now its just a matter of getting that huge air bubble out of your loop. If you choose not to have a reservoir or T-Line (ive seen it before) you wont be able to completely purge your loop of air bubbles. Honestly, it baffles me as to why you wouldnt use a reservoir.

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Sun Light:[/b] [/u][/color]
Be advised that water does evaporate out of your loop. Sunlight on your computer excels this as well as excels algae growth in your loop. Sunlight should be avoided with watercooling loops.

[color="#FFFF00"]Mixing Alu and Cu: Many cheaper watercooling kits come with Alu tops or Alu radiators (thermaltake) in order to cut cost. Unfortunately, mixing these two metals cause [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galvanic_corrosion"]galvanic corrosion[/url]. Using anti corrosive additives can slow this down, but not stop it. In short, [u]DO NOT USE ALU WITH CU[/u]![/color]

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Pump: [/b][/u]*****[/center][/color]

The pump is obviously the heart of your loop. Its purpose is no secret.
-In today�s watercooling you performance relies on flow rate (among other things). As the loops flow increases from 0GPM to 1GPM we see an almost linear increase in performance which begins to level out at about 1GPM. Anything over 1GPM only offers a minimal performance increase, though the increase is still there. Shooting for the 1GPM mark should be your goal with anything over 1GPM an added bonus.

Reviews:
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=170509 (Alphacool AP1510)
http://martin.skinneelabs.com/Danger-Den_CPX-Pro-Pump-Review.html (DD CPX-PRO)
http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC31PumpTopTesting.html (DDC 3.1/MCP 350)
http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC32PumpTopTesting.html (DDC 3.2/MCP 355)
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=170217 (D5/MCP 655)
http://skinneelabs.com/d5-tops.html (D5 Top Comparison)

How to setup: Depending on your CPU block, you either want a high flow pump (low resistant blocks) or high head pump (impingement blocks/high resistant blocks). Also note, it is very important to have a nice flow of water going to your pump as well, making it imperative to have your reservoir positioned so that the output flows directly to your pump�s input during bleeding. If you are using a T-Line, the same applies (position your T-Line directly before the pump input). Running a pump dry can damage the pump. Excess bubbles or cavitation can damage the blades. If you have a variable speed pump, always use the lowest setting too bleed.

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Reservoir/T-Line:[/b] [/u]*****[/center][/color]

First, lets look at Reservoir vs T-Line:
-The benefits of a reservoir is its ease of use. It is much easier to bleed a loop and purge a loop of air bubble with a reservoir than a T-Line. However, the T-Line generally offers a higher flow rate and head pressure throughout the loop (unfortunately, no research to back this up that Ive been able to find, but its common belief that the T-Line does offer a bit higher performance. With that said, IMO, the benefits are not noticeable if present). Other than that, the only difference is the T-Line setups usually end up being a bit cheaper and taking up a lot less space.

-Some reservoirs out there can be too small for your pump/loop, and as the fast flowing water shoots into the res, bubbles can be generated from the turbulence and sucked back into your loop. Cylinder reservoirs can create "tornadoes" when paired with a high flow pump (some have inserts to inhibit this behavior). Be very careful when picking out a reservoir.

TLine:
-Basically a T fitting that allows the liquid to flow through with a third opening to attach a tube. This tube can be filled with liquid and capped to act as a reservoir.

How to setup: The Reservoir should be the highest component in the loop or close to it (helps you bleed a loop). The liquid should flow directly from the reservoir to the pump. The T-Line can benefit from being high in the loop as well, but its more important (IMO) to have it positioned directly before the pump intake.

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Radiator: [/b] [/u]*****[/center][/color]

Your radiator is the cooling component of your loop. Each radiator can release/radiate up to a set amount of heat from your loop (depending on size, speed of fan, etc...). You must have more heat output from your radiator than heat input from your CPU, GPU's etc... My Rule of thumb is a 240mm Rad for the CPU (a 120mm will work) and one 120 for each GPU (I can easily run two overvolted G92's and an overclocked Q6600 on 240mm rad and 120mm rad). Note: a waterloop CANNOT lower the temp below that of your ambient air.

[b][u]Radiator Designs[/u]:[/b]
-Fin structure: Dense fins offer better surface area for heat dispersal but require more powerful fans to force air through the rad. The more dense the fins the higher potential for cooling. Radiators such as the Black Ice GTX/GTS have a very dense fin structure and are very poor performers with low flow fans, however are practically un-beatable with high flow fans. Radiators that have a less dense fin setup do much better with low flow fans as more air is able to pass through. However, the potential for cooling is decreased.
-Thickness/Deepness: Some radiators are "dual row" (water goes through twice. Almost like two thinner rads crushed together) for better heat dispersal. These rads also generally require stronger fans for air flow, however some usually lessen the fins per inch to increase their performance with low flow fans.

[b][u]Flow Design[/u]:[/b]
-Cross flow vs Dual pass: The Cross Flow design is spotted easily buy the two fittings positioned opposite corners. The water flows through each tube only once, from one side to the other. This rad is not a common design and is generally used with high flow pumps only. Dual pass rads have the fittings on the same side and are the most commonly used rads. The liquid flows through fitting 1 and up one half of the rad, mixes on the opposite side of the fittings and back down the other side of the rad and out of fitting 2. The increased turbulence of the dual pass rad generally increases the cooling ability, which is probably why its the more commonly used rad.

Reviews:
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026[/url]
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026[/url]
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445[/url]
[url="http://www.skinneelabs.com/Radiators/HWLabs/SR1/HWLabs_SR1-360.html"]http://www.skinneelabs.com/Radiators/HWLab...bs_SR1-360.html[/url] - Black Ice SRI Review
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081[/url] (*120 vs 140mm Rad*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874[/url] (*Effectiveness of Sandwitched radiators*)

More at: http://skinneelabs.com/radiators.html

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Waterblock:[/b][/u]*****[/center][/color]

[b][u]CPU[/u]:[/b]
This is a hard one. There are so many new blocks out today with very similar and excellent performance, but I will give it a try:

First lets talk about Laminar Flow (very simplified explanation): When water flows over a surface, the water close to the surface generally flows slower than the water further away. This can create a blanket of sorts over your waterblock, inhibiting heat transfer.

There are two basic designs: Impingement and non-Impingement. Impingement blocks generally are high resistant blocks and require pumps with high head pressure. These blocks generally uses small holes or �jets� to shoot the water into the block, creating a turbulent flow to help over come laminar flow and increase the heat transfer from the block to the water. Non-Impingement have less resistance but are more subject to laminar flow. These blocks are generally used when multiple blocks are used in a loop, to allow more flow through the entire loop. Impingement blocks can hinder flow and degrade cooling to other components in your loop, however are generally better than non-impingement blocks at cooling your CPU. One other down side to note is Impingement blocks can be easily clogged. Make sure your water is clean!

Reviews:
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712[/url]
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243[/url]
[url="http://translate.google.de/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hardwareluxx.de%2Fcommunity%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D611143&sl=de&tl=en&hl=de&ie=UTF-8"]http://translate.google.de/translate?u=htt...de&ie=UTF-8[/url]
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=224976&highlight=heatkiller"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...ight=heatkiller[/url]
[url="http://www.awardfabrik.de/kuhlung-wasser/cpu-wasserkuhler-roundup-12-2009-neue-teststation-13.html"]http://www.awardfabrik.de/kuhlung-wasser/c...station-13.html[/url] - CPU round up with Swiftech's new XT block
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=235967"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=235967[/url]
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446[/url] - Effect of flow rate on blocks

More at: http://skinneelabs.com/cpu-blocks.html

[b][u]GPU[/u]:[/b]
Full Cover vs Dedicated GPU block: Full cover blocks are very popular due to their cooling of all parts of the GPU (GPU, Ram, Mosfets, etc�) and ease of use in multi GPU setups. Unfortunately, these blocks suffer from decreased cooling effectiveness over the GPU vs dedicated GPU blocks and (usually) decreased flow rate. These blocks are also not easily interchangeable between different GPUs if at all. Dedicated GPU blocks require an additional heatsync/s to cool the other components on the video card, however they usually cool the GPU much better and generally have better flow rates. Most dedicated GPU blocks are easily interchangeable.

Cooling of the GPU shows very little increase in overclocking performance over air cooling. When picking a GPU block, the cooling performance of that block probably shouldnt be your primary concern (all GPU blocks will do a great job and the extra 1-5C one block offers over another wont help much at all with overclocking). You should mostly be concerned with how the block will fit in your loop, ie the thickness of the block (single vs dual slot cooling) and the ability to run multi GPU setups.

Reviews:
http://skinneelabs.com/gtx480-fc.html (GTX480 Roundup)
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=157994 (Swiftech MCW-60 vs DeTek Fuzion)

[b][u]NB/SB/MOSFET Blocks[/u]:[/b]
Im not going to get into each individual block here but go over what you want to look for. These components on your Moboard don�t need exotic cooling. There are many NB blocks that are designed with a higher surface area for better cooling, however this isn�t necessary and only increases resistance in your loop. The MCW30 NB block is just a flat piece of copper and cools just fine. Don�t add un-needed resistance to your loop.

Further, watercooling your SB is not needed. Overclocking does not affect your SB unless you are overclocking your PCI Express lanes.

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Tubing:[/b][/u]*****[/center][/color]

Tubing is self explanatory. However, I wish to clear up some common miss conceptions as to the performance of different sizes. There is actually a rather small performance increase going from 3/8� to 1/2" tubing. There, its all cleared up. Watch out for cheap tubing as they can kink easily and allow too much evaporation out of your loop. You can also use tube coils to keep tubing from kinking during tight bends.

[u]Tubing Sizes[/u]:
There are three major tubing sizes, based off the US standard inch (sorry everyone else): 1/4�, 3/8�, and 1/2�. There is also a 7/16� tubing designed to fit the same barbs as the 1/2" tubing, but slightly smaller in diameter to help with tight spaces/small cases (we�ll get more into the 1/2" vs 7/16� later).

Breaking it down further, tubing comes with different wall sizes as well. You will notice that while shopping for tubing, you see two different measurements, an ID (inner dimension) and OD (outer dimension) size. The ID is your basic size as listed above (either 1/4�, 3/8�, 1/2�, or 7/16�). The OD size, however, will vary, depending on the thickness of the tube walls, with the bigger OD size equaling the thicker walls (of course). This is important as your clamp sizes will need to be paired with the proper tube size (more of that in a minute). I recommend the thicker walled tubing for the following benefits: Less water evaporates out of your loop over time and your tube has more structural integrity (does not kink as easily). However, ticker tubing can take up a bunch of space and can really pose a problem for small cases, specially when you are dealing with larger loops.

[u]1/2� vs 7/16� tubing[/u]:
These two tube sizes can be confusing to some, so Ill give a general overview. The difference in ID size is only about .06� for these two sizes, however the difference in OD size is quite substantial (see below). The 1/2� tubing can be unruly when fitted in a cramped case as mentioned above. 7/16� tubing is designed to offer the same performance as 1/2� tubing and fit the same fitting size, while at the same time, offer watercoolers a much easier tube size to work with. While it does fit 1/2 fittings, it is a very tight fit. Some ways to help get the smaller tubing over the larger fitting include using soap or detergent (I don�t like the idea of soap in my loop and generally don�t use the method). I prefer dipping the tube ends in boiling water for about 20-30secs, and slipping them over the fitting. As the ends cool and contract, they form a very tight fit over the fitting. In fact, they fit so tight, you can actually get away with not using tube clamps (though I wouldn�t ever try this/recommend this).

[u]Clamps[/u]:
There are four widely used ways of securing the tube to its fitting. First is the basic hose clamp (most kits/parts will come with these). They are self explanatory to say the least. Make sure though, that you pair them with your tubing�s OD size, not ID size! Next are the worm drive hose clamps, a metal band that utilizes a screw to tighten them down. A cheap method, yet just as effective is uses zip ties. Ive used my share of zip ties, and while a bit ghetto, they work just fine. Last, but not least are compression fittings. IMO, there is no real need for these �cept for cosmetics (they look cool as hell). Its hard to explain how they work in words but any common ape can figure them out. Ive never used one before and don�t plan on it (too much $$ for no practical reason). They are theoretically for high pressure loops, but I don�t think there are many watercooling loops that run at that high of a pressure.

[u]Some common tube sizes[/u]:
-1/4� ID and 3/8� OD
-3/8� ID and 1/2� OD or 5/8� OD
-7/16� ID and 5/8� OD (you usually don�t see thick walls on the 7/16� tubes as they are designed to be small in the first place)
-1/2� ID and 3/4" OD

Reviews:
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767[/url]
http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=266003 (How elbows affect flow rate and cooling)

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Liquid:[/b][/u]*****[/center][/color]

Liquid is easy. Used distilled water (can buy it in the Gallons from your local store). Dionized and distilled water are pretty much the same thing. The less additive (anti corrosive additives, dyes, etc...) the better the cooling performance. There are liquids such as Feser that are basically distilled water with an additive or two. They are marketed as "non conductive" but so is distilled water. Unfortunately, if you spill either, they will pick up ions and become conductive so make sure you shut off you comp quick. Use rubbing alcohol to clean and be sure to remove ALL PARTS to make sure noting go into the connection slots (mem slots, PCI slots, etc�).

Dyes:
I recomend not using these. Some can become gooy, some chalky, and all fade/stop glowing after about a month. If you want a pretty loop, use colored tubing (Feser and I believe XSPC make some nice glow tubes).

Anti corrosive additives:
Running straight water is the best option for performance. If you are running a straight Cu or Alu loop, you wont need any anti corrosive additives so dont worry about it. If you are mixing metals you are wrong.

Algea:
Unfortunately, algea is an issue, especially if you have the sun on your case. There are a few ways you can effectively battle algae:
-PT Nuke found on Petrastechshop.com: There are two types of PT nuke. The blue PT nuke is for adding into a loop that utilizes an additive (a dye or anti corrosive additive). The white bottled PT nuke is for straight distilled water. Each only needs 1-2 drops per litter of water.
-Silver: Putting silver in your loop will inhibit algea growth. They sell coils of silver called "Kill coils" to put in your tubing, however jewelry will work just fine, as long as it cant be sucked into your pump!
-Avoid sun light: This is straight forward. They also make black tubes that effectively block out sunlight. Im not sure how well this works on its own but shinny black tubing can look very nice!

[color="#FF0000"][center]*****[u][b]Overall Loop setup[/b][/u]*****[/center][/color]

One of the most common questions is �I have the parts, what do I do now?� Or �how do I position this part within my loop?� Some of these questions were answered above, however I will go ahead and consolidate them here: Most importantly, you must be sure your tubing is optimized. Eliminate un-need bends, curves, etc� and try to use as little tubing as possible. Depending on your preferences, it doesn�t really matter what block comes first as water temps generally reach an equilibrium throughout the loop. However, the pump should be positioned low in your system (at least have the reservoir above the pump!), the reservoir should be the highest component in your system, and the T-Line (if used) should be located directly before the pump intake. You should also have the tubing run from the reservoir directly to the pump intake. It can be slightly beneficial to stager radiators throughout the loop, cooling the water from your CPU before it reaches the GPU, etc� however, remember that it is better to try to optimize your tubing instead.

There is talk from lots of watercoolers that when using Impingement blocks, the loop should flow directly from the Pump to the block to make sure the highest amount of head pressure is being applied to the CPU block. They also say that for non-impingement blocks, the flow should got the rad first and then the CPU, to offer to coolest amount of water to the CPU block. These are probably true, but I doubt they make that much of a difference. The difference in temps between the input and output of a radiator is barely 1-2C, and the head should be the same throughout the loop. I think its more important to focus on optimizing the tubing instead.

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Reviews:[/b][/u][/color]
- [url="http://martin.skinneelabs.com/"]http://martin.skinneelabs.com/[/url] Martin is one of the greatest pioneers in watercooling testing. His reviews are unbias and very accurate.
- [url="http://www.skinneelabs.com/"]http://www.skinneelabs.com/[/url] Taking up where Martin left off, Skinnee is quickley becomming a very noteworhty tester.
- [url="http://gilgameshreviews.com/index.php?opti...ing-and-cooling"]http://gilgameshreviews.com/index.php?opti...ing-and-cooling[/url]
-Tom's Hardware Liquid Cooled How To ------- [url="http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-begi...-pc,1573-3.html"]http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-begi...-pc,1573-3.html[/url]
-Reviews of a Bunch of different Parts ------- [url="http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/"]http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/[/url]
-Water-cooling parts guide (slightly outdated) ------- [url="http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232"]http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232[/url]
-Great watercooling Guide: [url="http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232"]http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232[/url]

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Quick links to Reviews/Links throughout Guide:[/b][/u][/color]
[url="http://www.dangerden.com/store/product.php?productid=402&cat=23&page=1#tabs"]http://www.dangerden.com/store/product.php...amp;page=1#tabs[/url] (*Pumps*)
[url="http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC32PumpTopTesting.html"]http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC32PumpTopTesting.html[/url] (*Pumps*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=218032"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=218032[/url] (*Pumps*)

[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026[/url] (*Radiators*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445[/url] (*Radiators*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081[/url] (*120 vs 140mm Rad*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874[/url] (*Effectiveness of Sandwitched radiators*)

[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712[/url] (*CPU Blocks*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243[/url] (*CPU Blocks*)
[url="http://translate.google.de/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hardwareluxx.de%2Fcommunity%2Fshowthread.php%3Ft%3D611143&sl=de&tl=en&hl=de&ie=UTF-8"]http://translate.google.de/translate?u=htt...de&ie=UTF-8[/url] (*CPU Blocks*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=224976&highlight=heatkiller"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...ight=heatkiller[/url] (*CPU Blocks*)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446[/url] (*Effect of flow rate on blocks*)

[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767[/url] (*Tubing*)


[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Fan Reviews:[/b][/u][/color]

[url="http://martin.skinneelabs.com/Radiator-Fan-Orientation-And-Shroud-Testing-Review.html"]http://martin.skinneelabs.com/Radiator-Fan...ing-Review.html[/url] (Fan orientation; Martin)

[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221899"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221899[/url] (Martin P1)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=223391"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=223391[/url] (Martin P2)

[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171661"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171661[/url] (Vapor P2)
[url="http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=193126"]http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=193126[/url] (Vapor P3)

[color="#FF0000"][u][b]Websites to purchase watercooling:[/b][/u][/color]

- [url="http://www.Petrastechshop.com"]http://www.Petrastechshop.com[/url]
- [url="http://www.Dangerden.com"]http://www.Dangerden.com[/url]
- [url="http://www.FrozenCPU.com"]http://www.FrozenCPU.com[/url]
- [url="http://www.koolance.com/default.php"]http://www.koolance.com/default.php[/url]
- [url="http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm"]http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm[/url]
- [url="http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/"]http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/[/url] (German)
- [url="http://www.xoxide.com/"]http://www.xoxide.com/[/url]
- [url="http://www.coolitsystems.com/"]http://www.coolitsystems.com/[/url]
- [url="http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/"]http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/[/url]
- [url="http://jab-tech.com/"]http://jab-tech.com/[/url]
- [url="http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php"]http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php[/url]

***************************

Special thanks to Skinnee, Martin, Ashraf, Cathar, and all other members from Xtremesystems.org as well as Bundymania of the hardwareluxx community, for all the work and dedication put forth for the benefit of all.

Also thanks to Duolc and RPGman1 for providing usefull links /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />.

I take no credit for any of the posted reviews or information. I learned all from someone else and am in no way deserving of the work put forth by these forerunners in watercooling. Further, I in no way gareuntee the accuracy of this guide. Im am still in the learning phase as are many of us and am subject to mistakes. This is ment only for helping new users get a handle on watercooling. It is not ment to be scientifically accurate! For that, please visit skinneelabs.com or martin.skinneelabs.com (listed above).

***************************
********************StAndrew (Chris)�s Unofficial Watercooling guide:********************




***Note: READ FIRST*** Each section of this guide has links to applicable reviews, etc... Everytime I come across a helpful review or comparison (ie CPU block comparison/review), I place it in the appropriate section of this guide. Further, I have all reviews consolidated at the end of this guide for a quick look. Also included are websites for purchasing parts, other watercooling guides, and anything else I feel is important. Anyone who reads through this guide should never have to make vague posts or questions such as: "where do I get parts," "what parts should I get," "Im a noob needing help," etc... Reading this guide and reviewing the links should allow even the most novice user to get a good idea on what they need and where to get it. That way they can formulate more of a narrow request/question that is easier to answer. Unfortunately, vague questions as mentioned above, will most likely get jumped upon by over opinionated users (fanboys), or users with more enthusiasm than knowledge, and can lead towards even more confusion. Watercooling is not hard or "elite" as long as you take the right approach.



Basic parts:

-Pump

-Reservoir/T-Line

-Radiator

-Tubing

-Blocks

*CPU Blocks

*GPU Blocks

*NB/SB Blocks



Bleed:

To fill the tubes of your system once assembled. This can be very difficult to do if you dont take the necessary precautions noted below. In short, if you are using a reservoir, it should be one of the highest, if not, the highest positioned component in your loop (if you have a "tall" reservoir, as long as the top is higher than the rest of the loop, bleeding is made very simple). If you have a T-Line, I usually position mine directly by the pump intake. Its very difficult to bleed with a T-line but there are ways to make it easier. I usually disconnect the fitting located highest in the loop and start filling the T-Line, allowing the loop to fill up to the disconnected fitting. I then re-attach the fitting and end up with more than half of my loop bled. Now its just a matter of getting that huge air bubble out of your loop. If you choose not to have a reservoir or T-Line (ive seen it before) you wont be able to completely purge your loop of air bubbles. Honestly, it baffles me as to why you wouldnt use a reservoir.



Sun Light:

Be advised that water does evaporate out of your loop. Sunlight on your computer excels this as well as excels algae growth in your loop. Sunlight should be avoided with watercooling loops.



Mixing Alu and Cu: Many cheaper watercooling kits come with Alu tops or Alu radiators (thermaltake) in order to cut cost. Unfortunately, mixing these two metals cause galvanic corrosion. Using anti corrosive additives can slow this down, but not stop it. In short, DO NOT USE ALU WITH CU!



*****Pump: *****




The pump is obviously the heart of your loop. Its purpose is no secret.

-In today�s watercooling you performance relies on flow rate (among other things). As the loops flow increases from 0GPM to 1GPM we see an almost linear increase in performance which begins to level out at about 1GPM. Anything over 1GPM only offers a minimal performance increase, though the increase is still there. Shooting for the 1GPM mark should be your goal with anything over 1GPM an added bonus.



Reviews:

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=170509
(Alphacool AP1510)

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/Danger-Den_CPX-Pro-Pump-Review.html
(DD CPX-PRO)

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC31PumpTopTesting.html
(DDC 3.1/MCP 350)

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC32PumpTopTesting.html
(DDC 3.2/MCP 355)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=170217
(D5/MCP 655)

http://skinneelabs.com/d5-tops.html
(D5 Top Comparison)



How to setup: Depending on your CPU block, you either want a high flow pump (low resistant blocks) or high head pump (impingement blocks/high resistant blocks). Also note, it is very important to have a nice flow of water going to your pump as well, making it imperative to have your reservoir positioned so that the output flows directly to your pump�s input during bleeding. If you are using a T-Line, the same applies (position your T-Line directly before the pump input). Running a pump dry can damage the pump. Excess bubbles or cavitation can damage the blades. If you have a variable speed pump, always use the lowest setting too bleed.



*****Reservoir/T-Line: *****




First, lets look at Reservoir vs T-Line:

-The benefits of a reservoir is its ease of use. It is much easier to bleed a loop and purge a loop of air bubble with a reservoir than a T-Line. However, the T-Line generally offers a higher flow rate and head pressure throughout the loop (unfortunately, no research to back this up that Ive been able to find, but its common belief that the T-Line does offer a bit higher performance. With that said, IMO, the benefits are not noticeable if present). Other than that, the only difference is the T-Line setups usually end up being a bit cheaper and taking up a lot less space.



-Some reservoirs out there can be too small for your pump/loop, and as the fast flowing water shoots into the res, bubbles can be generated from the turbulence and sucked back into your loop. Cylinder reservoirs can create "tornadoes" when paired with a high flow pump (some have inserts to inhibit this behavior). Be very careful when picking out a reservoir.



TLine:

-Basically a T fitting that allows the liquid to flow through with a third opening to attach a tube. This tube can be filled with liquid and capped to act as a reservoir.



How to setup: The Reservoir should be the highest component in the loop or close to it (helps you bleed a loop). The liquid should flow directly from the reservoir to the pump. The T-Line can benefit from being high in the loop as well, but its more important (IMO) to have it positioned directly before the pump intake.



*****Radiator: *****




Your radiator is the cooling component of your loop. Each radiator can release/radiate up to a set amount of heat from your loop (depending on size, speed of fan, etc...). You must have more heat output from your radiator than heat input from your CPU, GPU's etc... My Rule of thumb is a 240mm Rad for the CPU (a 120mm will work) and one 120 for each GPU (I can easily run two overvolted G92's and an overclocked Q6600 on 240mm rad and 120mm rad). Note: a waterloop CANNOT lower the temp below that of your ambient air.



Radiator Designs:

-Fin structure: Dense fins offer better surface area for heat dispersal but require more powerful fans to force air through the rad. The more dense the fins the higher potential for cooling. Radiators such as the Black Ice GTX/GTS have a very dense fin structure and are very poor performers with low flow fans, however are practically un-beatable with high flow fans. Radiators that have a less dense fin setup do much better with low flow fans as more air is able to pass through. However, the potential for cooling is decreased.

-Thickness/Deepness: Some radiators are "dual row" (water goes through twice. Almost like two thinner rads crushed together) for better heat dispersal. These rads also generally require stronger fans for air flow, however some usually lessen the fins per inch to increase their performance with low flow fans.



Flow Design:

-Cross flow vs Dual pass: The Cross Flow design is spotted easily buy the two fittings positioned opposite corners. The water flows through each tube only once, from one side to the other. This rad is not a common design and is generally used with high flow pumps only. Dual pass rads have the fittings on the same side and are the most commonly used rads. The liquid flows through fitting 1 and up one half of the rad, mixes on the opposite side of the fittings and back down the other side of the rad and out of fitting 2. The increased turbulence of the dual pass rad generally increases the cooling ability, which is probably why its the more commonly used rad.



Reviews:

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445

http://www.skinneelabs.com/Radiators/HWLab...bs_SR1-360.html - Black Ice SRI Review

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081 (*120 vs 140mm Rad*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874 (*Effectiveness of Sandwitched radiators*)



More at: http://skinneelabs.com/radiators.html



*****Waterblock:*****




CPU:

This is a hard one. There are so many new blocks out today with very similar and excellent performance, but I will give it a try:



First lets talk about Laminar Flow (very simplified explanation): When water flows over a surface, the water close to the surface generally flows slower than the water further away. This can create a blanket of sorts over your waterblock, inhibiting heat transfer.



There are two basic designs: Impingement and non-Impingement. Impingement blocks generally are high resistant blocks and require pumps with high head pressure. These blocks generally uses small holes or �jets� to shoot the water into the block, creating a turbulent flow to help over come laminar flow and increase the heat transfer from the block to the water. Non-Impingement have less resistance but are more subject to laminar flow. These blocks are generally used when multiple blocks are used in a loop, to allow more flow through the entire loop. Impingement blocks can hinder flow and degrade cooling to other components in your loop, however are generally better than non-impingement blocks at cooling your CPU. One other down side to note is Impingement blocks can be easily clogged. Make sure your water is clean!



Reviews:

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243

http://translate.google.de/translate?u=htt...de&ie=UTF-8

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...ight=heatkiller

http://www.awardfabrik.de/kuhlung-wasser/c...station-13.html - CPU round up with Swiftech's new XT block

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=235967

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446 - Effect of flow rate on blocks



More at: http://skinneelabs.com/cpu-blocks.html



GPU:

Full Cover vs Dedicated GPU block: Full cover blocks are very popular due to their cooling of all parts of the GPU (GPU, Ram, Mosfets, etc�) and ease of use in multi GPU setups. Unfortunately, these blocks suffer from decreased cooling effectiveness over the GPU vs dedicated GPU blocks and (usually) decreased flow rate. These blocks are also not easily interchangeable between different GPUs if at all. Dedicated GPU blocks require an additional heatsync/s to cool the other components on the video card, however they usually cool the GPU much better and generally have better flow rates. Most dedicated GPU blocks are easily interchangeable.



Cooling of the GPU shows very little increase in overclocking performance over air cooling. When picking a GPU block, the cooling performance of that block probably shouldnt be your primary concern (all GPU blocks will do a great job and the extra 1-5C one block offers over another wont help much at all with overclocking). You should mostly be concerned with how the block will fit in your loop, ie the thickness of the block (single vs dual slot cooling) and the ability to run multi GPU setups.



Reviews:

http://skinneelabs.com/gtx480-fc.html
(GTX480 Roundup)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=157994
(Swiftech MCW-60 vs DeTek Fuzion)



NB/SB/MOSFET Blocks:

Im not going to get into each individual block here but go over what you want to look for. These components on your Moboard don�t need exotic cooling. There are many NB blocks that are designed with a higher surface area for better cooling, however this isn�t necessary and only increases resistance in your loop. The MCW30 NB block is just a flat piece of copper and cools just fine. Don�t add un-needed resistance to your loop.



Further, watercooling your SB is not needed. Overclocking does not affect your SB unless you are overclocking your PCI Express lanes.



*****Tubing:*****




Tubing is self explanatory. However, I wish to clear up some common miss conceptions as to the performance of different sizes. There is actually a rather small performance increase going from 3/8� to 1/2" tubing. There, its all cleared up. Watch out for cheap tubing as they can kink easily and allow too much evaporation out of your loop. You can also use tube coils to keep tubing from kinking during tight bends.



Tubing Sizes:

There are three major tubing sizes, based off the US standard inch (sorry everyone else): 1/4�, 3/8�, and 1/2�. There is also a 7/16� tubing designed to fit the same barbs as the 1/2" tubing, but slightly smaller in diameter to help with tight spaces/small cases (we�ll get more into the 1/2" vs 7/16� later).



Breaking it down further, tubing comes with different wall sizes as well. You will notice that while shopping for tubing, you see two different measurements, an ID (inner dimension) and OD (outer dimension) size. The ID is your basic size as listed above (either 1/4�, 3/8�, 1/2�, or 7/16�). The OD size, however, will vary, depending on the thickness of the tube walls, with the bigger OD size equaling the thicker walls (of course). This is important as your clamp sizes will need to be paired with the proper tube size (more of that in a minute). I recommend the thicker walled tubing for the following benefits: Less water evaporates out of your loop over time and your tube has more structural integrity (does not kink as easily). However, ticker tubing can take up a bunch of space and can really pose a problem for small cases, specially when you are dealing with larger loops.



1/2� vs 7/16� tubing:

These two tube sizes can be confusing to some, so Ill give a general overview. The difference in ID size is only about .06� for these two sizes, however the difference in OD size is quite substantial (see below). The 1/2� tubing can be unruly when fitted in a cramped case as mentioned above. 7/16� tubing is designed to offer the same performance as 1/2� tubing and fit the same fitting size, while at the same time, offer watercoolers a much easier tube size to work with. While it does fit 1/2 fittings, it is a very tight fit. Some ways to help get the smaller tubing over the larger fitting include using soap or detergent (I don�t like the idea of soap in my loop and generally don�t use the method). I prefer dipping the tube ends in boiling water for about 20-30secs, and slipping them over the fitting. As the ends cool and contract, they form a very tight fit over the fitting. In fact, they fit so tight, you can actually get away with not using tube clamps (though I wouldn�t ever try this/recommend this).



Clamps:

There are four widely used ways of securing the tube to its fitting. First is the basic hose clamp (most kits/parts will come with these). They are self explanatory to say the least. Make sure though, that you pair them with your tubing�s OD size, not ID size! Next are the worm drive hose clamps, a metal band that utilizes a screw to tighten them down. A cheap method, yet just as effective is uses zip ties. Ive used my share of zip ties, and while a bit ghetto, they work just fine. Last, but not least are compression fittings. IMO, there is no real need for these �cept for cosmetics (they look cool as hell). Its hard to explain how they work in words but any common ape can figure them out. Ive never used one before and don�t plan on it (too much $$ for no practical reason). They are theoretically for high pressure loops, but I don�t think there are many watercooling loops that run at that high of a pressure.



Some common tube sizes:

-1/4� ID and 3/8� OD

-3/8� ID and 1/2� OD or 5/8� OD

-7/16� ID and 5/8� OD (you usually don�t see thick walls on the 7/16� tubes as they are designed to be small in the first place)

-1/2� ID and 3/4" OD



Reviews:

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=266003
(How elbows affect flow rate and cooling)



*****Liquid:*****




Liquid is easy. Used distilled water (can buy it in the Gallons from your local store). Dionized and distilled water are pretty much the same thing. The less additive (anti corrosive additives, dyes, etc...) the better the cooling performance. There are liquids such as Feser that are basically distilled water with an additive or two. They are marketed as "non conductive" but so is distilled water. Unfortunately, if you spill either, they will pick up ions and become conductive so make sure you shut off you comp quick. Use rubbing alcohol to clean and be sure to remove ALL PARTS to make sure noting go into the connection slots (mem slots, PCI slots, etc�).



Dyes:

I recomend not using these. Some can become gooy, some chalky, and all fade/stop glowing after about a month. If you want a pretty loop, use colored tubing (Feser and I believe XSPC make some nice glow tubes).



Anti corrosive additives:

Running straight water is the best option for performance. If you are running a straight Cu or Alu loop, you wont need any anti corrosive additives so dont worry about it. If you are mixing metals you are wrong.



Algea:

Unfortunately, algea is an issue, especially if you have the sun on your case. There are a few ways you can effectively battle algae:

-PT Nuke found on Petrastechshop.com: There are two types of PT nuke. The blue PT nuke is for adding into a loop that utilizes an additive (a dye or anti corrosive additive). The white bottled PT nuke is for straight distilled water. Each only needs 1-2 drops per litter of water.

-Silver: Putting silver in your loop will inhibit algea growth. They sell coils of silver called "Kill coils" to put in your tubing, however jewelry will work just fine, as long as it cant be sucked into your pump!

-Avoid sun light: This is straight forward. They also make black tubes that effectively block out sunlight. Im not sure how well this works on its own but shinny black tubing can look very nice!



*****Overall Loop setup*****




One of the most common questions is �I have the parts, what do I do now?� Or �how do I position this part within my loop?� Some of these questions were answered above, however I will go ahead and consolidate them here: Most importantly, you must be sure your tubing is optimized. Eliminate un-need bends, curves, etc� and try to use as little tubing as possible. Depending on your preferences, it doesn�t really matter what block comes first as water temps generally reach an equilibrium throughout the loop. However, the pump should be positioned low in your system (at least have the reservoir above the pump!), the reservoir should be the highest component in your system, and the T-Line (if used) should be located directly before the pump intake. You should also have the tubing run from the reservoir directly to the pump intake. It can be slightly beneficial to stager radiators throughout the loop, cooling the water from your CPU before it reaches the GPU, etc� however, remember that it is better to try to optimize your tubing instead.



There is talk from lots of watercoolers that when using Impingement blocks, the loop should flow directly from the Pump to the block to make sure the highest amount of head pressure is being applied to the CPU block. They also say that for non-impingement blocks, the flow should got the rad first and then the CPU, to offer to coolest amount of water to the CPU block. These are probably true, but I doubt they make that much of a difference. The difference in temps between the input and output of a radiator is barely 1-2C, and the head should be the same throughout the loop. I think its more important to focus on optimizing the tubing instead.



Reviews:

- http://martin.skinneelabs.com/ Martin is one of the greatest pioneers in watercooling testing. His reviews are unbias and very accurate.

- http://www.skinneelabs.com/ Taking up where Martin left off, Skinnee is quickley becomming a very noteworhty tester.

- http://gilgameshreviews.com/index.php?opti...ing-and-cooling

-Tom's Hardware Liquid Cooled How To ------- http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-begi...-pc,1573-3.html

-Reviews of a Bunch of different Parts ------- http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/

-Water-cooling parts guide (slightly outdated) ------- http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232

-Great watercooling Guide: http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232



Quick links to Reviews/Links throughout Guide:

http://www.dangerden.com/store/product.php...amp;page=1#tabs (*Pumps*)

http://martin.skinneelabs.com/DDC32PumpTopTesting.html (*Pumps*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=218032 (*Pumps*)



http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=220026 (*Radiators*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=226445 (*Radiators*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=210081 (*120 vs 140mm Rad*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=220874 (*Effectiveness of Sandwitched radiators*)



http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=206712 (*CPU Blocks*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221243 (*CPU Blocks*)

http://translate.google.de/translate?u=htt...de&ie=UTF-8 (*CPU Blocks*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showth...ight=heatkiller (*CPU Blocks*)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/Forums/showthread.php?t=203446 (*Effect of flow rate on blocks*)



http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=147767 (*Tubing*)





Fan Reviews:



http://martin.skinneelabs.com/Radiator-Fan...ing-Review.html (Fan orientation; Martin)



http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=221899 (Martin P1)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=223391 (Martin P2)



http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=171661 (Vapor P2)

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=193126 (Vapor P3)



Websites to purchase watercooling:



- http://www.Petrastechshop.com

- http://www.Dangerden.com

- http://www.FrozenCPU.com

- http://www.koolance.com/default.php

- http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm

- http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/ (German)

- http://www.xoxide.com/

- http://www.coolitsystems.com/

- http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/

- http://jab-tech.com/

- http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php



***************************



Special thanks to Skinnee, Martin, Ashraf, Cathar, and all other members from Xtremesystems.org as well as Bundymania of the hardwareluxx community, for all the work and dedication put forth for the benefit of all.



Also thanks to Duolc and RPGman1 for providing usefull links /smile.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':smile:' />.



I take no credit for any of the posted reviews or information. I learned all from someone else and am in no way deserving of the work put forth by these forerunners in watercooling. Further, I in no way gareuntee the accuracy of this guide. Im am still in the learning phase as are many of us and am subject to mistakes. This is ment only for helping new users get a handle on watercooling. It is not ment to be scientifically accurate! For that, please visit skinneelabs.com or martin.skinneelabs.com (listed above).



***************************

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895:
Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732:
Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#1
Posted 05/12/2009 06:39 PM   
Excellent Guide

Might want to add in Not mixing Aluminium parts and cooper parts and maybe a small section on What types of liquids you should use.
Excellent Guide



Might want to add in Not mixing Aluminium parts and cooper parts and maybe a small section on What types of liquids you should use.

#2
Posted 05/12/2009 07:41 PM   
[quote name='Duolc' post='303799' date='May 12 2009, 02:41 PM']Excellent Guide

Might want to add in Not mixing Aluminium parts and cooper parts and maybe a small section on What types of liquids you should use.[/quote]

Fixed! Thanks. Also looking to add reviews and websites to purchase watercooling supplies so just reply them here and Ill add them in the original post.
[quote name='Duolc' post='303799' date='May 12 2009, 02:41 PM']Excellent Guide



Might want to add in Not mixing Aluminium parts and cooper parts and maybe a small section on What types of liquids you should use.



Fixed! Thanks. Also looking to add reviews and websites to purchase watercooling supplies so just reply them here and Ill add them in the original post.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895:
Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732:
Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#3
Posted 05/12/2009 09:38 PM   
Well the major Players that come to Mind are

Koolance --------- [url="http://www.koolance.com/default.php"]http://www.koolance.com/default.php[/url]

Danger Den ------------ [url="http://www.dangerden.com/store/"]http://www.dangerden.com/store/[/url]

FrozenCPU ------------ [url="http://www.frozencpu.com/"]http://www.frozencpu.com/[/url]

Aqua Computer ------------------ [url="http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm"]http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm[/url]

WaterCool -------- [url="http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/"]http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/[/url] (German)

Xoxide --------- [url="http://www.xoxide.com/"]http://www.xoxide.com/[/url]

CoolIT -------- [url="http://www.coolitsystems.com/"]http://www.coolitsystems.com/[/url]

Tom's Hardware Liquid Cooled How To ------- [url="http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-beginners-guide-for-watercooling-your-pc,1573-3.html"]http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-begi...-pc,1573-3.html[/url]

Reviews of a Bunch of different Parts ------- [url="http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/"]http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/[/url]
Well the major Players that come to Mind are



Koolance --------- http://www.koolance.com/default.php



Danger Den ------------ http://www.dangerden.com/store/



FrozenCPU ------------ http://www.frozencpu.com/



Aqua Computer ------------------ http://www.aqua-computer.de/e_index.htm



WaterCool -------- http://www.watercool.de/aktuell/ (German)



Xoxide --------- http://www.xoxide.com/



CoolIT -------- http://www.coolitsystems.com/



Tom's Hardware Liquid Cooled How To ------- http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/a-begi...-pc,1573-3.html



Reviews of a Bunch of different Parts ------- http://www.tomshardware.com/s/reviews/liquid-cooling-parts/

#4
Posted 05/12/2009 10:45 PM   
Sidewinder Computers ------- [url="http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/"]http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/[/url]
Jab-tech ------- [url="http://jab-tech.com/"]http://jab-tech.com/[/url]
Performance-PCs ------- [url="http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php"]http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php[/url]
Water-cooling parts guide (slightly outdated) ------- [url="http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/showthread.php?t=282232"]http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232[/url]
Nice guide StAndrew. I definitely need to figure out how to water cool my i7 rig. If I can get enough money for it, then this will be my first water cooling build. My case is a silver ATCS 840, so it should have proper fittings for a 120.3 radiator on top. I've seen one water cooling rig with my case here, but he sold his water-cooling i7 rig for a c2q rig.
Sidewinder Computers ------- http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/

Jab-tech ------- http://jab-tech.com/

Performance-PCs ------- http://www.performance-pcs.com/catalog/index.php

Water-cooling parts guide (slightly outdated) ------- http://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/show...ad.php?t=282232

Nice guide StAndrew. I definitely need to figure out how to water cool my i7 rig. If I can get enough money for it, then this will be my first water cooling build. My case is a silver ATCS 840, so it should have proper fittings for a 120.3 radiator on top. I've seen one water cooling rig with my case here, but he sold his water-cooling i7 rig for a c2q rig.

#5
Posted 05/13/2009 02:47 AM   
Thanks for the write up. It's nicer to direct people to here then to other sites.
Thanks for the write up. It's nicer to direct people to here then to other sites.

#6
Posted 05/13/2009 03:24 AM   
Thanks everyone. I leave today for a 7mo deployment to the Med and Gulf so I wont be around much. Ill try to stop in when I can. I hope this guide helps (it was thrown together in about an hour and Im still grooming for mistakes/typos). Be sure to correct any mistakes or inaccuracies you note. And for all you english teachers, Im not really interested in gramatical corrections, or mispelings :smile:.
Thanks everyone. I leave today for a 7mo deployment to the Med and Gulf so I wont be around much. Ill try to stop in when I can. I hope this guide helps (it was thrown together in about an hour and Im still grooming for mistakes/typos). Be sure to correct any mistakes or inaccuracies you note. And for all you english teachers, Im not really interested in gramatical corrections, or mispelings :smile:.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895:
Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732:
Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#7
Posted 05/13/2009 12:25 PM   
Good luck.
Good luck.

#8
Posted 05/14/2009 02:24 AM   
now thats what i'm talking about, a true guide for the clueless (somewhat clueless anyway) like me, to get him started.
now thats what i'm talking about, a true guide for the clueless (somewhat clueless anyway) like me, to get him started.

#9
Posted 05/14/2009 11:35 AM   
Very nice guide, think this should help a lot of people get started and has some nie things to look at for those who have been doing it a while too. Good job /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />
Very nice guide, think this should help a lot of people get started and has some nie things to look at for those who have been doing it a while too. Good job /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

"It seems emotional outbursts require more than 1.56 volts" - The Potato (Portal 2)



Intel i5-2500k 4.4GHz | 8GB Corsair Vengeance 1600MHz | ASUS P67 Sabertooth | Palit GTX580 | 240GB OCZ Vertex 2 + 300GB Velociraptor + Spinpoint F3 1TB | OCZ Game-Xstream 850W | CM Cosmos S | Windows 7 64bit | ASUS VG236H 3D Vision | Logitech G15 + G9 | X-Fi 'Fatal1ty' Titanium Pro | Logitech Z2300

Custom LCS | Laing DDC3.2 w/XSPC clear top | BlackIce GT-X360 | EK Supreme HF full nickel | Bitspower Black Drivebay Reservoir | 3/8" Black Tygon R3400 | Red DP Ultra Fluid


3DMark Vantage = 32074 (clicky)

#10
Posted 05/14/2009 04:06 PM   
a very nice guide, i say sticky it so it can help allot of people. Couse if it flips to page 2 nobody is gonna find it anymore
a very nice guide, i say sticky it so it can help allot of people. Couse if it flips to page 2 nobody is gonna find it anymore

#11
Posted 05/20/2009 07:01 AM   
Indeed sticky this. Would be very useful
Indeed sticky this. Would be very useful

#12
Posted 05/21/2009 01:22 AM   
any admin wanna jump on this ???
any admin wanna jump on this ???

#13
Posted 05/25/2009 12:33 PM   
Ahoy from Greece! Thanks all, though I dont think this is sticky level (yet). Im trying to revise this to be a bit more user friendly and understandable for new users. Ill work on it while at sea and maby have a better version next port visit.
Ahoy from Greece! Thanks all, though I dont think this is sticky level (yet). Im trying to revise this to be a bit more user friendly and understandable for new users. Ill work on it while at sea and maby have a better version next port visit.

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895:
Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732:
Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#14
Posted 06/08/2009 01:29 PM   
You Lucky!!! Greece !!!! I am Jealous. Nice cars over in Europe!

Wish we could open a "Sticky This" Poll.
You Lucky!!! Greece !!!! I am Jealous. Nice cars over in Europe!



Wish we could open a "Sticky This" Poll.

#15
Posted 06/08/2009 06:51 PM   
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