Using NVFLASH A Defacto Guide for the BRAVE
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The first article I participated in here [[url="http://forums.slizone.com/index.php?showtopic=17981&hl=nvflash"]Using NVFLASH[/url]]
is quite outdated and is full of FUD.

So, I am using the opportunity now to update this subject in this new thread dedicated to using NVFLASH.

I will be concentrating on the Windows Command line version. This works from inside windows and NOT pre-post DOS. Do not try to use the GUI version
from a bootable floppy or USB key, as there may be unknown issues using it [gui] from pre-post DOS.

[code]I am NOT hard-linking to these downloads or pages for respect of the respective hosts and owners.



USE THESE FILES AT YOUR OWN RISK



NIBITOR - Version 4.7 [url=http://www.mvktech.net/component/option,com_remository/Itemid,26/func,fileinfo/filecatid,2944/parent,category/]

NVFLASH - WINDOWS CLI GUI Version [url=http://www.techpowerup.com/downloads/1222/NVFlash_5.67_for_Windows.html][/code]


Ok now the fun begins.

Nvidia Bios Editor

The first thing we will do is backup our original BIOS image to a file.
This can be done with the Nvflash utility or with NiBitor. This section will demonstate the NiBitor methode.

[code]Stage 0



Backup your graphics card BIOS to file for later restoration.



1] Install the NiBitor program downloaded from the above link.

2] Open the NiBitor program from where you installed it.

3] Goto the "tools" menu.

4] In the submenu "select device", a window will open.

5] Select your card [there will be an entry for each card in your system from top to bottom PCI-e slots]

6] "ok"

7] "tools" -> "read bios" -> "read into file"

8] A window will open aaking you where to save the file you are about to create. For simplicity save it directly to your C:/ drive

9] Name the file according to your GPU version ex.: 7950gt_ORIGINAL_BIOS.rom

10] "save"[/code]

A new file with your specified name has been created where your told NiBitor to save the file.
This file may be needed later for resoration of original BIOS if you see fit.

Next we will modify the BIOS and save as a different BIOS.rom file.

[code]Stage 1



Opening NiBitor and reading BIOS from your graphics card.



1] Open the NiBitor program from where you installed it.

2] Goto the "tools" menu.

3] You will see "Read BIOS" and a submenu.

4] In the submenu "select device", a window will open.

5] Select your card [there will be an entry for each card in your system from top to bottom PCI-e slots]

6] "OK"

7] "tools" -> "read bios" -> "read into NiBitor"[/code]

Stage 1 has read the information from your nvidia graphics card BIOS to allow modification of your BIOS to save to a modified BIOS file for later use.
This can also be achieved by following Stage 0 and opening the file you created with NiBitor for direct modification and saved as a different name
ex.: 7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom

Looking at the NiBitor program we can see a lot of information staring back at us.

Starting at the top we see: Info
"File: x:pathtoROMfile.rom" - This is either the file you saved and then reopened or it will read "Internal BIOS".
"Device: Nvidia PCI-E 7950 GT" - This is your GPU.
"BIOS Version: 05.71.22.42.03" - The internal version number of your GPU card BIOS.
"Vendor: BFG" - Who made the card. [BFG, XFX, EVGA, etc] Do not be worried if <unknown> is displayed here. It makes NO difference if the correct info is here or not.
"Date: 10/17/06" - month/day/year - The date the BIOS was created [This info does NOT change]
"Product: G71 Board - p455h7s" - The GPU version and PCB identity. [THIS INFO WILL NOT CHANGE]
"Integrrity:" There will be one of three[3] images [orb] here.
1] green - Not modified/Settings within OK range
2] red - Serious damage could be done to the card if these settings are flashed
3] yellow - Caution modified information

In the middle we see a series of tabs including:
"Clockrates"
Here we see the clocks your card currently has.
There is an option just below this centered.
"Change amount of active performance levels"
This allows more than two[2] states or performance levels.

Next we see:
"Extra" --- --- ---
This is only enabled on SOME cards that have the option to use this information. Normally it is not used and should be ignored. Otherwise it is
treated as any other performance level and should only be increase by a small amount, as with other clockrates.

"3D" 620 --- 800 (1600Mhz DDR) 0
Core settings that are active during gaming and anything using the GPU for rendering

"Thrtl" 600 --- 790 (1580Mhz DDR) 20
Core settings applied if there is a THERMAL event to protect the card.

"2D" 565 --- 715 (1430Mhz DDR) 20
Core settings for desktop and other programs not using 3D acceleration.

A button "bootup clocks"
Leave this alone, as the settings here are optimal for your card. Does nothing for performance at all.

With this tab explained we can start changing settings.

There are 3 sections for each performance level.
"Core:" - The clockrate your GPU operates at.
"Shader:" - The clockrate your shaders operates at.
"Memory:" - The clockrate your memory operates at.

Beyond that you see:
"Geometric delta clock" - This is the difference in clockrate between your "Core" and "Shaders" on cards that don't have shader clock manipulation.

Before you flash your card with any new BIOS I highly suggest you test some clockrates with RivaTuner first. This program allows driver level
Overclocking in the manner NVtune in your NVCP[Nvidia Control Panel] finds optimal clockrates.

Once you have found clockrates that are stable and don't create artifacts while using 3D intensive applications for extended periods of time [1hour plus]
Those settings can be considered safe to flash in a new BIOS image.

The next tab is:
"Voltages"
When you click this tab you will be greeted by a warning that it is highly unsafe to change or modify these settings. I would tend to agree.
If you are going to change voltages here ONLY selct what is the next voltage UP from your CURRENT voltage in the 3D voltage box.

There is a sub tab in this section:
"VID Mode" - Voltage Identifier
Here is where you select a higher voltage for your GPU. ONLY go one step higher than Voltage2 if there is an available option here.
If "?.?V" is the only new available option DO NOT select this as there is no documentation on that VID.

The other tabs are not recommended for you to modify and are only there for ADVANCED users who have extensive knowledge about how memory operates.
NOT RECOMENDED TO CHANGE ANYTHING BEYOND THE VOLTAGES TAB

Now that you have all the information you need to change the clockrates you can now save the new BIOS with modified clockrates as
"7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom"
- Replace "7950gt" with your cards model. ex.: 8800gt, 9300gs, etc.

With NiBitor explained now you should have a .ROM saved in your C:/ drive directory for easy access and we can continue with nvflash GUI 5.33.

Here is probably the hardest part as most people do not use the Command Line Interface[CLI] at all or very little.
This operation is the same under Pre Post DOS as it is here but with the exception that we can do it from within windows and do not need to create
a bootable floppy or USB key with HP tools as explained by JieMan. I will include his operation within this document for convenience rather than
provide a link.

First we will learn how to flash your video card with the new BIOS .ROM image we created using NiBitor earlier with the Windows CLI GUI NVflash 5.33.

Extract the Windows CLI CMD 5.33 .zip file you downloaded to your C:/ directory in a folder named NVFLASH_GUI.

XP USERS:
1] Goto start
2] Run
3] cmd.exe


[code]IN THIS NEXT STAGE IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED THAT SLI IS OFF AND THAT NO OC IS APPLIED TO YOUR SYSTEM TO PREVENT SERIOUS DAMAGE TO YOUR CARD.

The same is recommended for using the Pre Post DOS methode later explained by JieMan.[/code]

Now a command prompt window will open. We will pass it some information to get to the folder where you extracted the NVFLASH Windows CLI GUI 5.33.

[code]cd c:

cd nvflash_gui[/code]

Now your command prompt should begin with:
c:nvflash_gui>

This means that you can now tell the CLI to perform actions from inside that folder.

Now you can use the CLI to interact with nvflash.exe

From your open CLI type:
"nvflash -h"
- this will display information about the various settings you can use that nvflash has built into it.

There are several 'pages' of information that is presented with the -h [help] option.
The first is of particular importance as you may need to use one of the options there to "unlock" the EEPROM on your GPU to allow for a successful flash operation.

There is an option that reads: "Write Protect EEPROM --protecton"
To unlock your EEPROM use the following command from the CLI

[code]nvflash --protectoff[/code]

You will be presented with the choice of video card if more than one is installed in your system.
Press the associated number for the card you wish to flash.

The program will now continue with the operation we told it to execute.
There will be a fairly loud "beep" that occurs to tell you that the operation completed successfully.
Also the last line displayed will read:
"Remove EEPROM write protect complete"

Now we are ready to continue with flashing the BIOS .ROM you created earlier.

At the open CLI use the following command:

[code]nvflash --index=0 c:nvflash_gui7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom[/code]

After this has been entered you will have the option to ABORT the operation if you are getting jumpy about do this to your [expensive] GPU.
If you are OK with continuing press "y" to complete the operation.
There will again be a fairly loud "beep" to tell you the operation was successful.

What did we just do?
We just flashed the new BIOS .ROM file to your card!!

You can now reapply the write protection to your GPU EEPROM if you would like to prevent accidental re-flashing if you happen to do something braindead.

Now all that Is required is for you to reboot your computer and use Gpuz or NiBitor to check if the BIOS was actually flashed to your GPU EEPROM.

[color="red"]UPDATE[/color]
WINDOWS GUI WILL NOT WORK ON VISTA AFTER I RE-TESTED [Had to install vista to check] Vista is no longer a DOS capable OS.
Therefore, the bootable USB or floppy is your -only- option UNLESS you have XP or a live cd/dvd with NVFLASH AND THE WINDOWS GUI CLI.
[s][currently trying to work out a cd based live system using WinPE 2.0, may take a while as I have dial-up - anyone willing to download the WAIK from MS and snail mail it to me on a dvd is more than welcome.][/s] [Thanks jaafaman]

live = BOOTABLE OS FROM CD-rom!!]

[s]For Vista users the WINDOWS operation is exactly the same as above but you MUST run the CLI [Command Line Interface] as "administrator" for anything to work.[/s]


Below is a snippit from JieMan of the operation using a bootable USB key made with HP tools.

[quote]Here we go, the method of my test.

1] Check to see if usb boot is supported with your motherboard, it should be.
2] Second get a usb flash drive.
3] You need the hp usb format tool : [url="http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=197"]hp usb format tool[/url]
4] At the top is says to click a link for files to make a boot usb click it or click here [url="http://files.extremeoverclocking.com/file.php?f=196"]here win 98 dos files[/url]
5] Download the files and extract the tool and install it.
6] Extract the windowns files and put them in folder on desktop
7] Start hp utility
8] Check create dos startup disk
9} Hit little button saying "using dos system files located at"
10] Go to the folder on your desktop where you extracted the win 98 dos files and select it
11] Hit start, let it format and your done

Don't worry if your usb drive has nothing on it. When you look the files, they are hidden.

Now get nvflash 5.72 url=http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/Video-Tweak/nVFlash.shtml]here[/url]

1] Download nvflash 5.72 you need to extract these a couple of times till you get the nvflash and note.
2] Copy nvflash to your usb drive.
3] Copy the BIOS .ROM you want to flash to the GPU EEPROM as well
4] Get them [url="http://www.mvktech.net/component/option,com_remository/Itemid,26/func,selectfolder/cat,4/"]here @ nvidia bios mkvtech[/url]
5] Don't forget to change the name of the bios file to newbios.rom then copy it to the usb stick.

Ready to start?
Here we go
1] Put in your usb flash drive and restart your computer
2] When you get to the startup screen hit f8 and select usb as your boot
3] You will see a simple win 98 dos splash screen then the prompt
4] My space bar will be replaced with a * mark so you know for sure its a space.
5] Type

[code]nvflash*-b*backup.rom ( nvflash -b backup.rom )[/code]

6] Hit enter it will back up your current cards bios to the usb

Next is the fun part

7] At the prompt type

[code]nvflash*-4*-5*-6*newbios.rom ( nvflash -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom )[/code]

8] Hit enter
9] You will be asked to hit "Y" a few times

That's it, you're done

10] Restart

If it doesn't work, then remember your steps if you see nothing and have to do a blind flash.
Get the hang of what you need to do to get to the dos prompt incase you can't see.
When there type at the prompt

[code]nvflash*-4*-5*-6*backup.rom ( nvflash -4 -5 -6 backup.rom )[/code]

Hit enter, then hit "y" repetitively.
You'll here a beep when it starts and when it ends
After the second beep restart and you should be fine.[/quote]

[color="red"]Links[/color]
Bart Preinstalled Environment : [url="http://www.nu2.nu/pebuilder/"][color="red"]GET IT HERE[/color][/url]
WinBuilder : [url="http://winbuilder.net/"][color="red"]GET IT HERE[/color][/url]

[color="green"]Acknowledgments[/color]
JieMan
jaafaman

[center][color="red"][size=5]DISCLAIMER[/size][/color]
[color="red"][size=2]ALL OF THIS INFORMATION IS OWNED BY ITS RESPECTIVE POSTER.
NO GUARANTEES OR LIABILITIES CAN BE APPLIED TO THE OWNERS OF THIS CONTENT AND AS SUCH CAN NOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE THAT THIS PROCEDURE MAY OR MAY NOT CAUSE.[/size][/color][/center]

[color="red"][size=1]Please do not post problem after problem... just send a pm to me about what needs to be fixed.. if anything, and I'll fix the Guide. Thankyou[/size][/color]

[s][size=1]-edit-: grammar and spelling... sorry.[/size][/s]
[s][size=1]-edit-: CLI does not work in vista... oops[/size][/s]
[s][size=1]-edit-: Added winbuilder link / acknowledgments[/size][/s]
The first article I participated in here [Using NVFLASH]

is quite outdated and is full of FUD.



So, I am using the opportunity now to update this subject in this new thread dedicated to using NVFLASH.



I will be concentrating on the Windows Command line version. This works from inside windows and NOT pre-post DOS. Do not try to use the GUI version

from a bootable floppy or USB key, as there may be unknown issues using it [gui] from pre-post DOS.



I  am  NOT  hard-linking  to  these  downloads  or  pages  for  respect  of  the  respective  hosts  and  owners.







USE THESE FILES AT YOUR OWN RISK







NIBITOR - Version 4.7 [url=http://www.mvktech.net/component/option,com_remository/Itemid,26/func,fileinfo/filecatid,2944/parent,category/]



NVFLASH - WINDOWS CLI GUI Version [url=http://www.techpowerup.com/downloads/1222/NVFlash_5.67_for_Windows.html]






Ok now the fun begins.



Nvidia Bios Editor



The first thing we will do is backup our original BIOS image to a file.

This can be done with the Nvflash utility or with NiBitor. This section will demonstate the NiBitor methode.



Stage  0







Backup your graphics card BIOS to file for later restoration.







1] Install the NiBitor program downloaded from the above link.



2] Open the NiBitor program from where you installed it.



3] Goto the "tools" menu.



4] In the submenu "select device", a window will open.



5] Select your card [there will be an entry for each card in your system from top to bottom PCI-e slots]



6] "ok"



7] "tools" -> "read bios" -> "read into file"



8] A window will open aaking you where to save the file you are about to create. For simplicity save it directly to your C:/ drive



9] Name the file according to your GPU version ex.: 7950gt_ORIGINAL_BIOS.rom



10] "save"




A new file with your specified name has been created where your told NiBitor to save the file.

This file may be needed later for resoration of original BIOS if you see fit.



Next we will modify the BIOS and save as a different BIOS.rom file.



Stage  1







Opening NiBitor and reading BIOS from your graphics card.







1] Open the NiBitor program from where you installed it.



2] Goto the "tools" menu.



3] You will see "Read BIOS" and a submenu.



4] In the submenu "select device", a window will open.



5] Select your card [there will be an entry for each card in your system from top to bottom PCI-e slots]



6] "OK"



7] "tools" -> "read bios" -> "read into NiBitor"




Stage 1 has read the information from your nvidia graphics card BIOS to allow modification of your BIOS to save to a modified BIOS file for later use.

This can also be achieved by following Stage 0 and opening the file you created with NiBitor for direct modification and saved as a different name

ex.: 7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom



Looking at the NiBitor program we can see a lot of information staring back at us.



Starting at the top we see: Info

"File: x:pathtoROMfile.rom" - This is either the file you saved and then reopened or it will read "Internal BIOS".

"Device: Nvidia PCI-E 7950 GT" - This is your GPU.

"BIOS Version: 05.71.22.42.03" - The internal version number of your GPU card BIOS.

"Vendor: BFG" - Who made the card. [BFG, XFX, EVGA, etc] Do not be worried if <unknown> is displayed here. It makes NO difference if the correct info is here or not.

"Date: 10/17/06" - month/day/year - The date the BIOS was created [This info does NOT change]

"Product: G71 Board - p455h7s" - The GPU version and PCB identity. [THIS INFO WILL NOT CHANGE]

"Integrrity:" There will be one of three[3] images [orb] here.

1] green - Not modified/Settings within OK range

2] red - Serious damage could be done to the card if these settings are flashed

3] yellow - Caution modified information



In the middle we see a series of tabs including:

"Clockrates"

Here we see the clocks your card currently has.

There is an option just below this centered.

"Change amount of active performance levels"

This allows more than two[2] states or performance levels.



Next we see:

"Extra" --- --- ---

This is only enabled on SOME cards that have the option to use this information. Normally it is not used and should be ignored. Otherwise it is

treated as any other performance level and should only be increase by a small amount, as with other clockrates.



"3D" 620 --- 800 (1600Mhz DDR) 0

Core settings that are active during gaming and anything using the GPU for rendering



"Thrtl" 600 --- 790 (1580Mhz DDR) 20

Core settings applied if there is a THERMAL event to protect the card.



"2D" 565 --- 715 (1430Mhz DDR) 20

Core settings for desktop and other programs not using 3D acceleration.



A button "bootup clocks"

Leave this alone, as the settings here are optimal for your card. Does nothing for performance at all.



With this tab explained we can start changing settings.



There are 3 sections for each performance level.

"Core:" - The clockrate your GPU operates at.

"Shader:" - The clockrate your shaders operates at.

"Memory:" - The clockrate your memory operates at.



Beyond that you see:

"Geometric delta clock" - This is the difference in clockrate between your "Core" and "Shaders" on cards that don't have shader clock manipulation.



Before you flash your card with any new BIOS I highly suggest you test some clockrates with RivaTuner first. This program allows driver level

Overclocking in the manner NVtune in your NVCP[Nvidia Control Panel] finds optimal clockrates.



Once you have found clockrates that are stable and don't create artifacts while using 3D intensive applications for extended periods of time [1hour plus]

Those settings can be considered safe to flash in a new BIOS image.



The next tab is:

"Voltages"

When you click this tab you will be greeted by a warning that it is highly unsafe to change or modify these settings. I would tend to agree.

If you are going to change voltages here ONLY selct what is the next voltage UP from your CURRENT voltage in the 3D voltage box.



There is a sub tab in this section:

"VID Mode" - Voltage Identifier

Here is where you select a higher voltage for your GPU. ONLY go one step higher than Voltage2 if there is an available option here.

If "?.?V" is the only new available option DO NOT select this as there is no documentation on that VID.



The other tabs are not recommended for you to modify and are only there for ADVANCED users who have extensive knowledge about how memory operates.

NOT RECOMENDED TO CHANGE ANYTHING BEYOND THE VOLTAGES TAB



Now that you have all the information you need to change the clockrates you can now save the new BIOS with modified clockrates as

"7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom"

- Replace "7950gt" with your cards model. ex.: 8800gt, 9300gs, etc.



With NiBitor explained now you should have a .ROM saved in your C:/ drive directory for easy access and we can continue with nvflash GUI 5.33.



Here is probably the hardest part as most people do not use the Command Line Interface[CLI] at all or very little.

This operation is the same under Pre Post DOS as it is here but with the exception that we can do it from within windows and do not need to create

a bootable floppy or USB key with HP tools as explained by JieMan. I will include his operation within this document for convenience rather than

provide a link.



First we will learn how to flash your video card with the new BIOS .ROM image we created using NiBitor earlier with the Windows CLI GUI NVflash 5.33.



Extract the Windows CLI CMD 5.33 .zip file you downloaded to your C:/ directory in a folder named NVFLASH_GUI.



XP USERS:

1] Goto start

2] Run

3] cmd.exe





IN  THIS  NEXT  STAGE  IT  IS  HIGHLY  RECOMMENDED  THAT  SLI  IS  OFF  AND  THAT  NO  OC  IS  APPLIED  TO  YOUR  SYSTEM  TO  PREVENT  SERIOUS  DAMAGE  TO  YOUR  CARD.



The same is recommended for using the Pre Post DOS methode later explained by JieMan.




Now a command prompt window will open. We will pass it some information to get to the folder where you extracted the NVFLASH Windows CLI GUI 5.33.



cd c:



cd nvflash_gui




Now your command prompt should begin with:

c:nvflash_gui>



This means that you can now tell the CLI to perform actions from inside that folder.



Now you can use the CLI to interact with nvflash.exe



From your open CLI type:

"nvflash -h"

- this will display information about the various settings you can use that nvflash has built into it.



There are several 'pages' of information that is presented with the -h [help] option.

The first is of particular importance as you may need to use one of the options there to "unlock" the EEPROM on your GPU to allow for a successful flash operation.



There is an option that reads: "Write Protect EEPROM --protecton"

To unlock your EEPROM use the following command from the CLI



nvflash  --protectoff




You will be presented with the choice of video card if more than one is installed in your system.

Press the associated number for the card you wish to flash.



The program will now continue with the operation we told it to execute.

There will be a fairly loud "beep" that occurs to tell you that the operation completed successfully.

Also the last line displayed will read:

"Remove EEPROM write protect complete"



Now we are ready to continue with flashing the BIOS .ROM you created earlier.



At the open CLI use the following command:



nvflash  --index=0  c:nvflash_gui7950gt_MOD_BIOS.rom




After this has been entered you will have the option to ABORT the operation if you are getting jumpy about do this to your [expensive] GPU.

If you are OK with continuing press "y" to complete the operation.

There will again be a fairly loud "beep" to tell you the operation was successful.



What did we just do?

We just flashed the new BIOS .ROM file to your card!!



You can now reapply the write protection to your GPU EEPROM if you would like to prevent accidental re-flashing if you happen to do something braindead.



Now all that Is required is for you to reboot your computer and use Gpuz or NiBitor to check if the BIOS was actually flashed to your GPU EEPROM.



UPDATE

WINDOWS GUI WILL NOT WORK ON VISTA AFTER I RE-TESTED [Had to install vista to check] Vista is no longer a DOS capable OS.

Therefore, the bootable USB or floppy is your -only- option UNLESS you have XP or a live cd/dvd with NVFLASH AND THE WINDOWS GUI CLI.

[currently trying to work out a cd based live system using WinPE 2.0, may take a while as I have dial-up - anyone willing to download the WAIK from MS and snail mail it to me on a dvd is more than welcome.] [Thanks jaafaman]



live = BOOTABLE OS FROM CD-rom!!]



For Vista users the WINDOWS operation is exactly the same as above but you MUST run the CLI [Command Line Interface] as "administrator" for anything to work.





Below is a snippit from JieMan of the operation using a bootable USB key made with HP tools.



Here we go, the method of my test.



1] Check to see if usb boot is supported with your motherboard, it should be.

2] Second get a usb flash drive.

3] You need the hp usb format tool : hp usb format tool

4] At the top is says to click a link for files to make a boot usb click it or click here here win 98 dos files

5] Download the files and extract the tool and install it.

6] Extract the windowns files and put them in folder on desktop

7] Start hp utility

8] Check create dos startup disk

9} Hit little button saying "using dos system files located at"

10] Go to the folder on your desktop where you extracted the win 98 dos files and select it

11] Hit start, let it format and your done



Don't worry if your usb drive has nothing on it. When you look the files, they are hidden.



Now get nvflash 5.72 url=http://www.softpedia.com/get/Tweak/Video-Tweak/nVFlash.shtml]here[/url]



1] Download nvflash 5.72 you need to extract these a couple of times till you get the nvflash and note.

2] Copy nvflash to your usb drive.

3] Copy the BIOS .ROM you want to flash to the GPU EEPROM as well

4] Get them here @ nvidia bios mkvtech

5] Don't forget to change the name of the bios file to newbios.rom then copy it to the usb stick.



Ready to start?

Here we go

1] Put in your usb flash drive and restart your computer

2] When you get to the startup screen hit f8 and select usb as your boot

3] You will see a simple win 98 dos splash screen then the prompt

4] My space bar will be replaced with a * mark so you know for sure its a space.

5] Type



nvflash*-b*backup.rom  (  nvflash  -b  backup.rom  )




6] Hit enter it will back up your current cards bios to the usb



Next is the fun part



7] At the prompt type



nvflash*-4*-5*-6*newbios.rom  (  nvflash  -4  -5  -6  newbios.rom  )




8] Hit enter

9] You will be asked to hit "Y" a few times



That's it, you're done



10] Restart



If it doesn't work, then remember your steps if you see nothing and have to do a blind flash.

Get the hang of what you need to do to get to the dos prompt incase you can't see.

When there type at the prompt



nvflash*-4*-5*-6*backup.rom  (  nvflash  -4  -5  -6  backup.rom  )




Hit enter, then hit "y" repetitively.

You'll here a beep when it starts and when it ends

After the second beep restart and you should be fine.




Links

Bart Preinstalled Environment : GET IT HERE

WinBuilder : GET IT HERE



Acknowledgments

JieMan

jaafaman



DISCLAIMER

ALL OF THIS INFORMATION IS OWNED BY ITS RESPECTIVE POSTER.

NO GUARANTEES OR LIABILITIES CAN BE APPLIED TO THE OWNERS OF THIS CONTENT AND AS SUCH CAN NOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGE THAT THIS PROCEDURE MAY OR MAY NOT CAUSE.




Please do not post problem after problem... just send a pm to me about what needs to be fixed.. if anything, and I'll fix the Guide. Thankyou



-edit-: grammar and spelling... sorry.

-edit-: CLI does not work in vista... oops

-edit-: Added winbuilder link / acknowledgments

#1
Posted 01/06/2009 12:17 PM   
very nice guide Circus,, I especially liked the part about the usb flash /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />
I'm gonna give your gue trick a try next time ..
edit... scratch that I run vista.. guess I'll stick to the usb method.
very nice guide Circus,, I especially liked the part about the usb flash /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

I'm gonna give your gue trick a try next time ..

edit... scratch that I run vista.. guess I'll stick to the usb method.

Image

#2
Posted 01/06/2009 02:55 PM   
Nice guide! I have my core voltage hardmoded and was looking to do my memory as well. Is there a way to soft mod the memory on a 9800 GTX+ using Nibitor or NVFLASH?
Nice guide! I have my core voltage hardmoded and was looking to do my memory as well. Is there a way to soft mod the memory on a 9800 GTX+ using Nibitor or NVFLASH?

Making stupid look good.



Rig:

Thermaltake Armor

Q9650 @ 4.05, 1800FSB

Striker II Extreme

4GB Patriot 2000 @ 8-8-8-26

x2 150GB WD VRaptor Drives in RAID 0

x2 Segate 320GB RAID 0 Secondary Data Backup

-1TB and 750GB Western Digital Mybooks for backup

x3 EVGA 9800 GTX+ SLI @ 1.45V ~900 core, 2300 shader, 1250 mem



Watercooling:

FuZion 2.0

Enzotech NB Block

x3 Swiftech Obsidians

MCP 655 With EK Top Rev 2

120 and 240 Black Ice Pro GT Stealth Rads

120 DangerDen XFlow rad



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=145895: Watercooling Guide for Beginners



http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=138732: Watercooling Pics Posted Here

#3
Posted 01/06/2009 04:23 PM   
[quote name='StAndrew' post='259649' date='Jan 6 2009, 08:23 AM']Nice guide! I have my core voltage hardmoded and was looking to do my memory as well. Is there a way to soft mod the memory on a 9800 GTX+ using Nibitor or NVFLASH?[/quote]

Well. You can use nibitor to see if there are any extra voltages available. Try one and benchmark. If there's no change then flash back to original.

I can't test if I don't have the hardware :wink:
[quote name='StAndrew' post='259649' date='Jan 6 2009, 08:23 AM']Nice guide! I have my core voltage hardmoded and was looking to do my memory as well. Is there a way to soft mod the memory on a 9800 GTX+ using Nibitor or NVFLASH?



Well. You can use nibitor to see if there are any extra voltages available. Try one and benchmark. If there's no change then flash back to original.



I can't test if I don't have the hardware :wink:

#4
Posted 01/06/2009 06:56 PM   
I have a copy of the WAIK that I use on my VLite installations. PM me with an address.

Also, you can use any of the DVD/CD-ROM burning utilities to create a bootable NVFlash disk from within their own libraries. I use Nero on mine to flash the 8800 GTX 640s I own. The biggest problem is not having the ability to write to CD/DVD if you need a copy of the original BIOS.

Two ways around this. First is to leave a small partition on one of your HDDs that can be configured with FAT so the DOS boot can read it (WIN 98's DOS can read NTFS but not write) and send the BIOS copy to there from NVFlash.

Second is to visit MVKTech, posting one of the most comprehensive original BIOS libraries I've found yet...
I have a copy of the WAIK that I use on my VLite installations. PM me with an address.



Also, you can use any of the DVD/CD-ROM burning utilities to create a bootable NVFlash disk from within their own libraries. I use Nero on mine to flash the 8800 GTX 640s I own. The biggest problem is not having the ability to write to CD/DVD if you need a copy of the original BIOS.



Two ways around this. First is to leave a small partition on one of your HDDs that can be configured with FAT so the DOS boot can read it (WIN 98's DOS can read NTFS but not write) and send the BIOS copy to there from NVFlash.



Second is to visit MVKTech, posting one of the most comprehensive original BIOS libraries I've found yet...

Intel Siler DX79SI Desktop Extreme | Intel Core i7-3820 Sandy Bridge-Extreme | DangerDen M6 and Koolance MVR-40s w/Black Ice Stealths | 32 GB Mushkin PC3-12800LV | NVIDIA GTX 660 Ti SLI | PNY GTX 470 | 24 GB RAMDisk (C:\Temp\Temp) | 120 GB Intel Cherryville SSDs (OS and UserData)| 530 GB Western Digital VelociRaptor SATA 2 RAID0 (C:\Games\) | 60 GB G2 SSDs (XP Pro and Linux) | 3 TB Western Digital USB-3 MyBook (Archive) | LG BP40NS20 USB ODD | LG IPS236 Monitor | LogiTech X-530 Speakers | Plantronics GameCom 780 Headphones | Cooler Master UCP 1100 | Cooler Master HAF XB | Windows 7 Pro x64 SP1

Stock is Extreme now

#5
Posted 01/06/2009 10:56 PM   
Mainly I would like the WAIK for testing with making an XP64 live disk with a bunch of tools including the NVFLASH GUI version, NiBitor, defrag, ghost, etc. Been itching for a customized live disk for a while but just found more info on the windowsPE that I would like to play with.

I have found a few sites that detail the operation, but I can't download the 1gb WAIK files from MS at any reasonable length of time.
Mainly I would like the WAIK for testing with making an XP64 live disk with a bunch of tools including the NVFLASH GUI version, NiBitor, defrag, ghost, etc. Been itching for a customized live disk for a while but just found more info on the windowsPE that I would like to play with.



I have found a few sites that detail the operation, but I can't download the 1gb WAIK files from MS at any reasonable length of time.

#6
Posted 01/07/2009 01:37 AM   
you can also use HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and 98 boot disks to make a usb flash drive that boots
you can also use HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and 98 boot disks to make a usb flash drive that boots

#7
Posted 01/07/2009 02:40 AM   
"you can also use HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and 98 boot disks to make a usb flash drive that boots"

This is already covered in the guide.

I was refering to the GUI version on a bootable windows LIVE Preinstallation Environment.

Please read the entire thread before reposting already covered actions.
"you can also use HP USB Disk Storage Format Tool and 98 boot disks to make a usb flash drive that boots"



This is already covered in the guide.



I was refering to the GUI version on a bootable windows LIVE Preinstallation Environment.



Please read the entire thread before reposting already covered actions.

#8
Posted 01/07/2009 02:43 AM   
Funny I have been linking this thread and I never realized I left out instructions on flashing multiple cards in SLI as well as a character limitation for dos .,

So basically , using the USB/DOS method I use to identify the cards its
i0 for card 1
i1 for card 2
i2 for card 3

for example to force flash multiple cards in the system leaving them installed it would be

nvflash -i0 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom <--hit enter
go through configuration and finish
then continue with the next card#

i1 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom

i2 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom

you need to enter each one as a separate flash , don't put them all in at once .
the same works for backing up the .rom

nvflash -i0 -b backup0.rom

i1 -b backup1.rom
i2 -b backup2.rom you may put whatever you like before .rom

which brings me to the dos character limitation ,,
you can only enter an 8 character name before .rom or the card won't backup or flash .

Things can be tricky with an igpu, so consider that when flashing the igpu is i0 , then the next card (discrete ) will be i1 and so on .
Funny I have been linking this thread and I never realized I left out instructions on flashing multiple cards in SLI as well as a character limitation for dos .,



So basically , using the USB/DOS method I use to identify the cards its

i0 for card 1

i1 for card 2

i2 for card 3



for example to force flash multiple cards in the system leaving them installed it would be



nvflash -i0 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom <--hit enter

go through configuration and finish

then continue with the next card#



i1 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom



i2 -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom



you need to enter each one as a separate flash , don't put them all in at once .

the same works for backing up the .rom



nvflash -i0 -b backup0.rom



i1 -b backup1.rom

i2 -b backup2.rom you may put whatever you like before .rom



which brings me to the dos character limitation ,,

you can only enter an 8 character name before .rom or the card won't backup or flash .



Things can be tricky with an igpu, so consider that when flashing the igpu is i0 , then the next card (discrete ) will be i1 and so on .

Image

#9
Posted 10/10/2009 04:53 AM   
Maybe it's a good idea to make a batch file for the backup rom to reflash in case of something going wrong


create a file with the name back.bat

enter this
@ECHO OFF
nvflash -4 -5 -6 backup.rom

save and when you have no display you only have to type back and Y a couple of times ;)
Maybe it's a good idea to make a batch file for the backup rom to reflash in case of something going wrong





create a file with the name back.bat



enter this

@ECHO OFF

nvflash -4 -5 -6 backup.rom



save and when you have no display you only have to type back and Y a couple of times ;)

#10
Posted 11/19/2009 07:54 AM   
i had bought 2 gtx 280 for sli, to my bad luck one was bad to i sent it back for exchnge after long wait i got 285...
now m tying to sli both of them, so i took backup of 285 changed device name to 280 and tried flashing...nvflash prompted that it is going to change the pci device id and final status as updated successfully.but after reboots, the device still shows old device name and when i try to reflash it prompts same way for change in device id with success wit no results.

i tried to flash backup as it is and it gave no device id change, whcih means the nvflash is tryng to do its job but it aint working

-4 -5 -6 -r are the options m using. card is rom bfg tech.

i get 2 warnings:
cannot open swap file c:\cwsdpmi.swp
and
none of the firmware image comptible pci device id match the pci device id of the adapter.

nvflash 5.88
i had bought 2 gtx 280 for sli, to my bad luck one was bad to i sent it back for exchnge after long wait i got 285...

now m tying to sli both of them, so i took backup of 285 changed device name to 280 and tried flashing...nvflash prompted that it is going to change the pci device id and final status as updated successfully.but after reboots, the device still shows old device name and when i try to reflash it prompts same way for change in device id with success wit no results.



i tried to flash backup as it is and it gave no device id change, whcih means the nvflash is tryng to do its job but it aint working



-4 -5 -6 -r are the options m using. card is rom bfg tech.



i get 2 warnings:

cannot open swap file c:\cwsdpmi.swp

and

none of the firmware image comptible pci device id match the pci device id of the adapter.



nvflash 5.88

#11
Posted 12/31/2009 03:58 PM   
I recently tried to update my bios with a standard update from Nvidia with my 8800 GT 512mb BFG. After the update I got a complete blank screen. I have got the origional BIOS off the internets and I have done everything right except when I try to flash the bios using nvflash it only detects the intergrated graphics card which is running in place of the f'd 8800. How do I flash the bios of the card instead?
Im using a USB stick and "nvflash -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom"
I recently tried to update my bios with a standard update from Nvidia with my 8800 GT 512mb BFG. After the update I got a complete blank screen. I have got the origional BIOS off the internets and I have done everything right except when I try to flash the bios using nvflash it only detects the intergrated graphics card which is running in place of the f'd 8800. How do I flash the bios of the card instead?

Im using a USB stick and "nvflash -4 -5 -6 newbios.rom"

#12
Posted 02/14/2010 08:44 PM   
The new Extreme Tuner from Galaxy beta 2.0 ( with Fermi support )
has the ability to flash the bios on a card, I have not fully tested it yet , but will report back as soon as I do .,

[url="http://www.galaxytech.com/en/downloadview.aspx?id=188"]http://www.galaxytech.com/en/downloadview.aspx?id=188[/url]
The new Extreme Tuner from Galaxy beta 2.0 ( with Fermi support )

has the ability to flash the bios on a card, I have not fully tested it yet , but will report back as soon as I do .,



http://www.galaxytech.com/en/downloadview.aspx?id=188

Image

#13
Posted 06/03/2010 07:28 PM   
Hy...sorry if this isn't the right place to post my problem.I have a BIG problem.The thing is that i have an e-vga 8800 ultra KO 768 MB GDDR3(bios version 60.80.18.00.65)...and i have problems AGAIN with this DAMN /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> video card...after 2 years of running perfectly screen artifact started to appear on my screen(red, pink, blue pixels, insane geometrics etc.)....even in DOS mode....so....i reflowed the card, changed the paste etc...then surprise...it ran perfectly at full specs(no downcloking, overclocking etc.) for almost 1 year...till this day...when the artifacts started again(ONLY WITH THE DRIVER INSTALLED)...right now i don't have any driver installed for the video card because if i install it....the specs go back to normal and the artifact appear instantly after entering windows...so i decided to take the bios from EVGA.8800GTX.SC.PCIe.768MB.Rev.02 because the performance of this card is right under my 8800 ultra and the specs are lower(GPU clock geometric domain, GPU clock shader domain etc.).....bassicaly a downgrade is what i want to do to my video card using the GTX bios......because i can't do the downgrade from the high level windows without the driver installed....i wish i could but i don't have time because of the artifact that are appearing so fast....thats why i want to do this from a lower level because i don't have any other choice.....what i want to know is....IF i do this what are the chances to fail writing the bios....and the chances to succesufully write it.....and if the GTX firmware 60.80.0A.00.15 will be good for my type of video card...or should i edit the bios file after i backup it from dos and then write the same modified bios again but with different values.......F*** i'm frustrated....so please tell me what you think.....thanks for reading and sorry for the mistakes...the bad english....any tips would be appreciated

l.t: ok guys....so i've done a bios backup first, then i modified the bios backup, lowered the clocks etc, then i saved it and write it again with succes... heh lucky me!. The driver is installed now, and it is ok for now...no artifacts and the temperature looks quite good....don't get me wrong but i love this card and i don't want her to die on me forever....ok im overreacting:D....but it is a good card and there is some more life in it, i feel it:))....i'm wondering how much does it take to die for good because its too good to be real...kinda baaad felling:)
Hy...sorry if this isn't the right place to post my problem.I have a BIG problem.The thing is that i have an e-vga 8800 ultra KO 768 MB GDDR3(bios version 60.80.18.00.65)...and i have problems AGAIN with this DAMN /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> video card...after 2 years of running perfectly screen artifact started to appear on my screen(red, pink, blue pixels, insane geometrics etc.)....even in DOS mode....so....i reflowed the card, changed the paste etc...then surprise...it ran perfectly at full specs(no downcloking, overclocking etc.) for almost 1 year...till this day...when the artifacts started again(ONLY WITH THE DRIVER INSTALLED)...right now i don't have any driver installed for the video card because if i install it....the specs go back to normal and the artifact appear instantly after entering windows...so i decided to take the bios from EVGA.8800GTX.SC.PCIe.768MB.Rev.02 because the performance of this card is right under my 8800 ultra and the specs are lower(GPU clock geometric domain, GPU clock shader domain etc.).....bassicaly a downgrade is what i want to do to my video card using the GTX bios......because i can't do the downgrade from the high level windows without the driver installed....i wish i could but i don't have time because of the artifact that are appearing so fast....thats why i want to do this from a lower level because i don't have any other choice.....what i want to know is....IF i do this what are the chances to fail writing the bios....and the chances to succesufully write it.....and if the GTX firmware 60.80.0A.00.15 will be good for my type of video card...or should i edit the bios file after i backup it from dos and then write the same modified bios again but with different values.......F*** i'm frustrated....so please tell me what you think.....thanks for reading and sorry for the mistakes...the bad english....any tips would be appreciated



l.t: ok guys....so i've done a bios backup first, then i modified the bios backup, lowered the clocks etc, then i saved it and write it again with succes... heh lucky me!. The driver is installed now, and it is ok for now...no artifacts and the temperature looks quite good....don't get me wrong but i love this card and i don't want her to die on me forever....ok im overreacting:D....but it is a good card and there is some more life in it, i feel it:))....i'm wondering how much does it take to die for good because its too good to be real...kinda baaad felling:)

#14
Posted 10/22/2010 02:43 PM   
Hy...sorry if this isn't the right place to post my problem.I have a BIG problem.The thing is that i have an e-vga 8800 ultra KO 768 MB GDDR3(bios version 60.80.18.00.65)...and i have problems AGAIN with this DAMN /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> video card...after 2 years of running perfectly screen artifact started to appear on my screen(red, pink, blue pixels, insane geometrics etc.)....even in DOS mode....so....i reflowed the card, changed the paste etc...then surprise...it ran perfectly at full specs(no downcloking, overclocking etc.) for almost 1 year...till this day...when the artifacts started again(ONLY WITH THE DRIVER INSTALLED)...right now i don't have any driver installed for the video card because if i install it....the specs go back to normal and the artifact appear instantly after entering windows...so i decided to take the bios from EVGA.8800GTX.SC.PCIe.768MB.Rev.02 because the performance of this card is right under my 8800 ultra and the specs are lower(GPU clock geometric domain, GPU clock shader domain etc.).....bassicaly a downgrade is what i want to do to my video card using the GTX bios......because i can't do the downgrade from the high level windows without the driver installed....i wish i could but i don't have time because of the artifact that are appearing so fast....thats why i want to do this from a lower level because i don't have any other choice.....what i want to know is....IF i do this what are the chances to fail writing the bios....and the chances to succesufully write it.....and if the GTX firmware 60.80.0A.00.15 will be good for my type of video card...or should i edit the bios file after i backup it from dos and then write the same modified bios again but with different values.......F*** i'm frustrated....so please tell me what you think.....thanks for reading and sorry for the mistakes...the bad english....any tips would be appreciated

l.t: ok guys....so i've done a bios backup first, then i modified the bios backup, lowered the clocks etc, then i saved it and write it again with succes... heh lucky me!. The driver is installed now, and it is ok for now...no artifacts and the temperature looks quite good....don't get me wrong but i love this card and i don't want her to die on me forever....ok im overreacting:D....but it is a good card and there is some more life in it, i feel it:))....i'm wondering how much does it take to die for good because its too good to be real...kinda baaad felling:)
Hy...sorry if this isn't the right place to post my problem.I have a BIG problem.The thing is that i have an e-vga 8800 ultra KO 768 MB GDDR3(bios version 60.80.18.00.65)...and i have problems AGAIN with this DAMN /verymad.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':verymad:' /> video card...after 2 years of running perfectly screen artifact started to appear on my screen(red, pink, blue pixels, insane geometrics etc.)....even in DOS mode....so....i reflowed the card, changed the paste etc...then surprise...it ran perfectly at full specs(no downcloking, overclocking etc.) for almost 1 year...till this day...when the artifacts started again(ONLY WITH THE DRIVER INSTALLED)...right now i don't have any driver installed for the video card because if i install it....the specs go back to normal and the artifact appear instantly after entering windows...so i decided to take the bios from EVGA.8800GTX.SC.PCIe.768MB.Rev.02 because the performance of this card is right under my 8800 ultra and the specs are lower(GPU clock geometric domain, GPU clock shader domain etc.).....bassicaly a downgrade is what i want to do to my video card using the GTX bios......because i can't do the downgrade from the high level windows without the driver installed....i wish i could but i don't have time because of the artifact that are appearing so fast....thats why i want to do this from a lower level because i don't have any other choice.....what i want to know is....IF i do this what are the chances to fail writing the bios....and the chances to succesufully write it.....and if the GTX firmware 60.80.0A.00.15 will be good for my type of video card...or should i edit the bios file after i backup it from dos and then write the same modified bios again but with different values.......F*** i'm frustrated....so please tell me what you think.....thanks for reading and sorry for the mistakes...the bad english....any tips would be appreciated



l.t: ok guys....so i've done a bios backup first, then i modified the bios backup, lowered the clocks etc, then i saved it and write it again with succes... heh lucky me!. The driver is installed now, and it is ok for now...no artifacts and the temperature looks quite good....don't get me wrong but i love this card and i don't want her to die on me forever....ok im overreacting:D....but it is a good card and there is some more life in it, i feel it:))....i'm wondering how much does it take to die for good because its too good to be real...kinda baaad felling:)

#15
Posted 10/22/2010 02:43 PM   
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