Disabling crosshairs
Lets say there is no in-game option to turn off crosshairs, is there any way nvidia can force it through drivers or some other way? Take for example clive barkers jericho. This game has excellent 3D stereo with nvidias 3D Vision but i cannot in any way disable the the game's crosshair. This totally ruins the experience since the crosshair does not have any depth whatsoever.
Lets say there is no in-game option to turn off crosshairs, is there any way nvidia can force it through drivers or some other way? Take for example clive barkers jericho. This game has excellent 3D stereo with nvidias 3D Vision but i cannot in any way disable the the game's crosshair. This totally ruins the experience since the crosshair does not have any depth whatsoever.

#1
Posted 02/18/2009 05:07 PM   
I don't have an exact answer on this question but I do know that games running on Valve Source (Half-life 2, Left 4 Dead, Coutnerstrike source, etc.) can be run without crosshairs even though it doesn't show an option for it. Simply enable the developer console in keyboard options>advanced, open the console by pushing the tilde key (~) and type in
[code]crosshair 0[/code]
Its actually really simple, but you just got to know it.
I don't have an exact answer on this question but I do know that games running on Valve Source (Half-life 2, Left 4 Dead, Coutnerstrike source, etc.) can be run without crosshairs even though it doesn't show an option for it. Simply enable the developer console in keyboard options>advanced, open the console by pushing the tilde key (~) and type in

crosshair 0


Its actually really simple, but you just got to know it.

#2
Posted 02/18/2009 09:47 PM   
[quote name='Guz' post='507494' date='Feb 18 2009, 11:07 AM']Lets say there is no in-game option to turn off crosshairs, is there any way nvidia can force it through drivers or some other way?[/quote]

First of all, force them off with a driver? Probably not.

Here's what I do when I have that problem:
1) look for in-game options to either disable crosshairs or make it a tiny dot (via shape or resizing) or make it 100% transparent.
2) check for a game console as the above post recommends (~ or Ctl-Alt-~ or other researched via internet) and a way to tweak the reticle as in #1.
3) exit game, check game config files (cfg or ini) for crosshair or reticle entries. Possibly check registry entries if you feel hopeful/desparate. Tweak values, restart game to check.

That's only good if you can enable and use the nvidia Lasersight. If not then I use the game-reticle using a high-convergence/low-separation setting assuming that the game-reticle is at screen-depth. This makes the game come out of the screen and since the reticle is at screen depththen it's in the 3d gamespace but only at a fixed distance, not auto-ranging like a good lasersight. Still if the separation is small it should be OK for a range of targets. It's tricky to find the best settings sometimes. Also, you may have to get used to being a little cross-eyed.This is one reason to get a projector and stand far away. It helps with this approach but I've found I can be happy using a monitor too. I consider this a big problem and nvidia should have given us a workaround by allowing us to control the depth of the HUD independantly of everything else. That would be great. It really makes the difference between usable and not-usable in stereo-3d. I take notes when I test a game and I refer to this approach so often I made up an acronym for it: hic-los. HI-Convergence/LO-Separation. By the way low sep doesn't really mean "hardly any 3d effect" it just means "as high as you can comfortably use effectively" which is usually pretty low compared to the separation that you would like to play at. It can still be good 3d though.

Here's the approach I use to set up hic-los mode:
start out in 2d and stand about 50 feet away from something in the game and use high separation without the glasses, then converge on that thing that is 50 feet away from you. Reduce separation to zero, put on your glasses and increase the separation untill it looks good to you. Your crosshairs should be dead-on whatever you converged on. Look around and testfire some shots. More distant or near targets may be a problem which is another reason for a low separation. Tweak settings from there. You may need to use the sep/conv hotkeys when zooming in/out/sniping. It's a pain I know. This approach works better for indoor games where distance doesn't vary too much. Also it will probably put your HUD at the same depth as your reticle (another reason for the 50 foot distance with low sep).

Note: people with a dual monitor/projector setup can slide one of their displays sideways a little and effectively give themselves an extra convergence control that works to push the entire scene back away from them so they won't be so cross-eyed.

Note 2: Often the game-reticle has extra info like ammo, range, target health, or an identify-friend-or-foe function that makes it very much more desirable than the nvidia lasersight. Especially if you're trying to target an invisible foe.

Happy hunting all.
[quote name='Guz' post='507494' date='Feb 18 2009, 11:07 AM']Lets say there is no in-game option to turn off crosshairs, is there any way nvidia can force it through drivers or some other way?



First of all, force them off with a driver? Probably not.



Here's what I do when I have that problem:

1) look for in-game options to either disable crosshairs or make it a tiny dot (via shape or resizing) or make it 100% transparent.

2) check for a game console as the above post recommends (~ or Ctl-Alt-~ or other researched via internet) and a way to tweak the reticle as in #1.

3) exit game, check game config files (cfg or ini) for crosshair or reticle entries. Possibly check registry entries if you feel hopeful/desparate. Tweak values, restart game to check.



That's only good if you can enable and use the nvidia Lasersight. If not then I use the game-reticle using a high-convergence/low-separation setting assuming that the game-reticle is at screen-depth. This makes the game come out of the screen and since the reticle is at screen depththen it's in the 3d gamespace but only at a fixed distance, not auto-ranging like a good lasersight. Still if the separation is small it should be OK for a range of targets. It's tricky to find the best settings sometimes. Also, you may have to get used to being a little cross-eyed.This is one reason to get a projector and stand far away. It helps with this approach but I've found I can be happy using a monitor too. I consider this a big problem and nvidia should have given us a workaround by allowing us to control the depth of the HUD independantly of everything else. That would be great. It really makes the difference between usable and not-usable in stereo-3d. I take notes when I test a game and I refer to this approach so often I made up an acronym for it: hic-los. HI-Convergence/LO-Separation. By the way low sep doesn't really mean "hardly any 3d effect" it just means "as high as you can comfortably use effectively" which is usually pretty low compared to the separation that you would like to play at. It can still be good 3d though.



Here's the approach I use to set up hic-los mode:

start out in 2d and stand about 50 feet away from something in the game and use high separation without the glasses, then converge on that thing that is 50 feet away from you. Reduce separation to zero, put on your glasses and increase the separation untill it looks good to you. Your crosshairs should be dead-on whatever you converged on. Look around and testfire some shots. More distant or near targets may be a problem which is another reason for a low separation. Tweak settings from there. You may need to use the sep/conv hotkeys when zooming in/out/sniping. It's a pain I know. This approach works better for indoor games where distance doesn't vary too much. Also it will probably put your HUD at the same depth as your reticle (another reason for the 50 foot distance with low sep).



Note: people with a dual monitor/projector setup can slide one of their displays sideways a little and effectively give themselves an extra convergence control that works to push the entire scene back away from them so they won't be so cross-eyed.



Note 2: Often the game-reticle has extra info like ammo, range, target health, or an identify-friend-or-foe function that makes it very much more desirable than the nvidia lasersight. Especially if you're trying to target an invisible foe.



Happy hunting all.

#3
Posted 04/01/2009 10:00 AM   
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