Enable PureVideo under Linux (MPEG-4 / H.264 XvMC)
  1 / 2    
Will NVIDIA even make their [url="http://www.nvidia.com/page/purevideo.html"]PureVideo™ Technology[/url] available under Linux?

@NVIDIA® Corporation, please let users and developers use your PureVideo API to accelerate high-definition H.264, WMV, and MPEG-2 video decoding using [url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]XvMC[/url], (or a other library if [url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]XvMC[/url] is not an option. [url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]XvMC[/url] is the Linux platforms open source answer to DxVA, Microsoft DirectX Video Acceleration API do it would be the natural choise).

Best for the open source community would be if NVIDIA open up the API as much as it has open up its CUDA API, which good dodumentations, specification, sample code and reference libraries. Enabling developers to activate support for PureVideo in the software running under Linux on a computer with a DirectX 9 (or 10) NVIDIA GPU that supports the PureVideo technology. Take VIA Technologies as a good example of a company have open source and helped implement hardware acceleation of MPEG-4 ASP (H.263) video on their Unichrome (S3) graphic processors via [url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]XvMC[/url] additions.

It is not only me, this is really a broadly wanted feature; popular open source multimedia player softwares on Linux such as these bellow need GPU hardware acceleration to assist with decoding MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) at native 1080p resolutions:
[url="http://www.mplayerhq.hu"]http://www.mplayerhq.hu[/url]
[url="http://www.videolan.org"]http://www.videolan.org[/url]
[url="http://www.xinehq.de"]http://www.xinehq.de[/url]
[url="http://www.mythtv.org"]http://www.mythtv.org[/url]
[url="http://www.linuxmce.com"]http://www.linuxmce.com[/url]
[url="http://www.xboxmediacenter.com"]http://www.xboxmediacenter.com[/url] (yes XBMC is being ported to Linux as I write this)

The processes that could possibly be accelerated by a NVIDIA graphics processor are:
* Motion compensation (mo comp)
* Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform (iDCT)
** Inverse Telecine 3:2 and 2:2 pull-down correction
* Bitstream processing (CAVLC/CABAC)
* in-loop deblocking
* inverse quantization (IQ)
* Variable-Length Decoding (VLD)
* Deinterlacing (Spatial-Temporal De-Interlacing)
**Plus automatic interlace/progressive source detection

PS! Most (if not all) open source softwares for Linux use [url="http://ffmpeg.mplayerhq.hu"]FFmpeg[/url] open source codec suit library to decode most popular video (and audio) formats. (FFmpeg can even decode WMV9 and VC-1 video). So it would be great if [url="http://ffmpeg.mplayerhq.hu"]FFmpeg[/url] could be used as a reference design for NIDIA PureVideo utilization under Linux. Note that bitstream processing (CAVLC/CABAC) and in-loop deblocking are probebely the two most important ones to have running on a GPU in order to playback MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) at native 1080p resolutions, but motion compensation (mo comp) and iDCT are probebely the simplest ones to implement.
Will NVIDIA even make their PureVideo™ Technology available under Linux?



@NVIDIA® Corporation, please let users and developers use your PureVideo API to accelerate high-definition H.264, WMV, and MPEG-2 video decoding using XvMC, (or a other library if XvMC is not an option. XvMC is the Linux platforms open source answer to DxVA, Microsoft DirectX Video Acceleration API do it would be the natural choise).



Best for the open source community would be if NVIDIA open up the API as much as it has open up its CUDA API, which good dodumentations, specification, sample code and reference libraries. Enabling developers to activate support for PureVideo in the software running under Linux on a computer with a DirectX 9 (or 10) NVIDIA GPU that supports the PureVideo technology. Take VIA Technologies as a good example of a company have open source and helped implement hardware acceleation of MPEG-4 ASP (H.263) video on their Unichrome (S3) graphic processors via XvMC additions.



It is not only me, this is really a broadly wanted feature; popular open source multimedia player softwares on Linux such as these bellow need GPU hardware acceleration to assist with decoding MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) at native 1080p resolutions:

http://www.mplayerhq.hu

http://www.videolan.org

http://www.xinehq.de

http://www.mythtv.org

http://www.linuxmce.com

http://www.xboxmediacenter.com (yes XBMC is being ported to Linux as I write this)



The processes that could possibly be accelerated by a NVIDIA graphics processor are:

* Motion compensation (mo comp)

* Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform (iDCT)

** Inverse Telecine 3:2 and 2:2 pull-down correction

* Bitstream processing (CAVLC/CABAC)

* in-loop deblocking

* inverse quantization (IQ)

* Variable-Length Decoding (VLD)

* Deinterlacing (Spatial-Temporal De-Interlacing)

**Plus automatic interlace/progressive source detection



PS! Most (if not all) open source softwares for Linux use FFmpeg open source codec suit library to decode most popular video (and audio) formats. (FFmpeg can even decode WMV9 and VC-1 video). So it would be great if FFmpeg could be used as a reference design for NIDIA PureVideo utilization under Linux. Note that bitstream processing (CAVLC/CABAC) and in-loop deblocking are probebely the two most important ones to have running on a GPU in order to playback MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) at native 1080p resolutions, but motion compensation (mo comp) and iDCT are probebely the simplest ones to implement.

#1
Posted 05/14/2007 02:47 PM   
Wouldn't mind seeing it myself, but I think the problem is how to tie it in.

Their direction in Windows has always been tied to DirectX in some fashion.
Initially by providing their own DirectX filters (the now obsolete PureVideo package) and then later going the DXVA/DXVA2 route where third party codecs could tie into HW Acceleration without having to know anything about the hardware itself.

So fundamentally their architecture has been to tie in to the codec layer either by providing it (via PureVideo Software Codecs) and later by adopting a "standard" (albeit MS's) DXVA/DXVA2.

The later is nice as it means they don't have to have a custom codec package anymore (PureVideo Software) or write and maintain a custom API layer that third party developers could use.

If there was a "standard" in Linux that allowed for codecs to offload to hardware (keep in mind without direct custom API's to the hardware) then maybe they would adopt it.

Yea, nvidia could expose an API layer that would allow for it but that means creating it from scratch and doubt that'll ever happen.
Wouldn't mind seeing it myself, but I think the problem is how to tie it in.



Their direction in Windows has always been tied to DirectX in some fashion.

Initially by providing their own DirectX filters (the now obsolete PureVideo package) and then later going the DXVA/DXVA2 route where third party codecs could tie into HW Acceleration without having to know anything about the hardware itself.



So fundamentally their architecture has been to tie in to the codec layer either by providing it (via PureVideo Software Codecs) and later by adopting a "standard" (albeit MS's) DXVA/DXVA2.



The later is nice as it means they don't have to have a custom codec package anymore (PureVideo Software) or write and maintain a custom API layer that third party developers could use.



If there was a "standard" in Linux that allowed for codecs to offload to hardware (keep in mind without direct custom API's to the hardware) then maybe they would adopt it.



Yea, nvidia could expose an API layer that would allow for it but that means creating it from scratch and doubt that'll ever happen.

#2
Posted 05/15/2007 08:17 AM   
Like I said in the other Thread:
MPEG1/2 HW-Decoding works on nVidia Hardware. But unfortunately, nothing else.
I use HW-MPEG2-Decoding with xine: xine -V xxmc $PathToFile
But you can also use, for example, mplayer: mplayer -vc ffmpeg12mc -vo xvmc $PathToFile

Unfortunately, the Linux-Driver (I think) and the only existing XvMC-capable MPEG1/2 decoder (ffmpeg12mc ffmpeg FFmpeg MPEG-1/2 (XvMC) [mpegvideo_xvmc]) only supports weave- and bob-deinterlacing.
For me, that produces a flickering/maybe even aliased picture.

But in general, XvMC IS a standard-Linux-Lib. It supports MPEG1/2, and some other formats (h264 for example). AFAIK, some VIA-Integrated VGA-Chipsets are supporting MPEG1/2 and h264 decoding.

Oh yeah... If you want to use MPEG1/2 acceleration, maybe you have to edit/create the /etc/X11/XvMCConfig config-file to include the nVidia XvMC-lib:
[code]libXvMCNVIDIA_dynamic.so.1[/code]
(that's all that have to be in that file)
Like I said in the other Thread:

MPEG1/2 HW-Decoding works on nVidia Hardware. But unfortunately, nothing else.

I use HW-MPEG2-Decoding with xine: xine -V xxmc $PathToFile

But you can also use, for example, mplayer: mplayer -vc ffmpeg12mc -vo xvmc $PathToFile



Unfortunately, the Linux-Driver (I think) and the only existing XvMC-capable MPEG1/2 decoder (ffmpeg12mc ffmpeg FFmpeg MPEG-1/2 (XvMC) [mpegvideo_xvmc]) only supports weave- and bob-deinterlacing.

For me, that produces a flickering/maybe even aliased picture.



But in general, XvMC IS a standard-Linux-Lib. It supports MPEG1/2, and some other formats (h264 for example). AFAIK, some VIA-Integrated VGA-Chipsets are supporting MPEG1/2 and h264 decoding.



Oh yeah... If you want to use MPEG1/2 acceleration, maybe you have to edit/create the /etc/X11/XvMCConfig config-file to include the nVidia XvMC-lib:

libXvMCNVIDIA_dynamic.so.1


(that's all that have to be in that file)

CPU: Intel Core2Quad Q9450
Board: MSI NEO2-FR
RAM: 4 GB DDR2-800
Graphics: Palit GeForce GTX 460 Sonic
Sound: XFi Fatal1ty pro gamer
OS: Windows 7 x64, Gentoo Linux (always with the recent stable Kernel)

#3
Posted 05/15/2007 09:40 AM   
[quote name='signal64' date='May 15 2007, 10:17 AM']If there was a "standard" in Linux that allowed for codecs to offload to hardware (keep in mind without direct custom API's to the hardware) then maybe they would adopt it.[/quote]Sorry if I did not make it clear; yes there is already a standard API on Linux for and it that is called "[url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]XvMC[/url]", which is the Linux (and UNIX) equivalent to Microsoft's DXVA so to speak. Like I also mentioned, NVIDIA already support this standard in its official Linux device driver, but again only for MPEG-2 as of yet.

XvMC is a open standard, it is included with both the X.Org and XFree86 server software as an extension of the X video extension (commonly refered to as just "XVideo" or "Xv") for the X Window System (commonly refered to as just "X11" or "X") which is the default video library used by most Linux and UNIX distributions.
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XvMC"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XvMC[/url]
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_video_extension"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_video_extension[/url]
[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System[/url]

MythTV and MPlayer are two other good reference players for XvMC
[url="http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC"]http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC[/url]
[url="http://www.mplayerhq.hu"]http://www.mplayerhq.hu[/url]

Again, VIA Technologies company does support hardware acceleration for more than just MPEG-2 for their S3G UniChrome UniChrome Pro graphics chipsets, they support decoding of motion compensation (mo comp), Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform (iDCT), and Variable-Length Decoding (VLD) for MPEG-2, MPEG-4 ASP (H.263), and MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) video. These very active open source projects provide source code for the device drivers, and a updated forked version of libxvmc:
[url="http://openchrome.org"]http://openchrome.org[/url]
[url="http://unichrome.sf.net"]http://unichrome.sf.net[/url]
[quote name='signal64' date='May 15 2007, 10:17 AM']If there was a "standard" in Linux that allowed for codecs to offload to hardware (keep in mind without direct custom API's to the hardware) then maybe they would adopt it.Sorry if I did not make it clear; yes there is already a standard API on Linux for and it that is called "XvMC", which is the Linux (and UNIX) equivalent to Microsoft's DXVA so to speak. Like I also mentioned, NVIDIA already support this standard in its official Linux device driver, but again only for MPEG-2 as of yet.



XvMC is a open standard, it is included with both the X.Org and XFree86 server software as an extension of the X video extension (commonly refered to as just "XVideo" or "Xv") for the X Window System (commonly refered to as just "X11" or "X") which is the default video library used by most Linux and UNIX distributions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XvMC

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_video_extension

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X_Window_System



MythTV and MPlayer are two other good reference players for XvMC

http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/index.php/XvMC

http://www.mplayerhq.hu



Again, VIA Technologies company does support hardware acceleration for more than just MPEG-2 for their S3G UniChrome UniChrome Pro graphics chipsets, they support decoding of motion compensation (mo comp), Inverse Discrete Cosine Transform (iDCT), and Variable-Length Decoding (VLD) for MPEG-2, MPEG-4 ASP (H.263), and MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) video. These very active open source projects provide source code for the device drivers, and a updated forked version of libxvmc:

http://openchrome.org

http://unichrome.sf.net

#4
Posted 05/15/2007 12:02 PM   
By the way, sorry for cross-posting but how do you get NVIDIA's attention in here to get this done?:
[url="http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=35698"]http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=35698[/url]

:P
By the way, sorry for cross-posting but how do you get NVIDIA's attention in here to get this done?:

http://forums.nvidia.com/index.php?showtopic=35698



:P

#5
Posted 05/18/2007 02:10 PM   
Open-Source Nvidia Drivers Petition (over 2500 people have signed up this far):
[url="http://www.petitiononline.com/nvfoss/"]http://www.petitiononline.com/nvfoss/[/url]

[quote]To:  Nvidia Corp.
The world-wide community of Linux users requests that Nvidia Corp. releases
fully-functional open-source (BSD-licensed) versions of their binary device
drivers, as soon as possible.

At the moment, Nvidia has released its 3-D enabled driver as a binary object
file along with some C wrappers for compatibility, as well as a modified
version of SGI's OpenGL library. While this solution is the best one besides
having an open-source driver, it does have many problems:

1. It subjects X-Window or the entire system to a large number of crashes,
and hang-ups. This is while a system where the drivers are not loaded, works
perfectly for weeks on end. So, if Linux users want to enjoy 3-D games, they
often have to put up with uptimes that make Windows look very stable.

2. It taints the system with non-free kernel modules and libraries. This
prevents getting help from the vendor or from other kernel developers, who
refuse to debug a tainted kernel (and rightfully so).

3. The kernel upgrade process becomes more complicated, as the driver needs
to be re-compiled after the kernel is up, while X needs to be shut down, etc.

4. The build process of the drivers often breaks with some kernel upgrades,
and requires third-party patches. (or even crashes the system after compiling
cleanly - e.g: one page stacks).

5. They don't provide a solution for people who wish to use the cards on
different computer architectures than the ones that Nvidia provides drivers
for. For example, the users of PowerPCs cannot use the 3-D capability of
their cards.

6. There are many other technical problems that often surface.

7. The nvidia engineers that work on the drivers cannot be effectively reached
or contacted.

The current solution offered by Nvidia may be the second-best solution. But
this is one case where the second best solution is not good enough.

The response of the Nvidia engineers to this problem in
[url="http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/t253027.html"]http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/t253027.html[/url] was completely
unsatisfactory. They claimed that they cannot release open source drivers
because "We have lots of IP in our supported closed source Linux driver some
of which is licensed and cannot be open sourced.". Well, if Nvidia has
copyrighted code in its drivers, then they can surely invest some money
in hiring more developers to re-write it. They are a very profitable company,
after all.

So we request that an open-source driver will be released as soon as possible.
Meanwhile, we are going to collect a bounty for reverse-engineering the
Nvidia drivers and releasing an open-source driver based on this effort
(using the open-source Mesa library).



Sincerely,

[url="http://new.petitiononline.com/mod_perl/signed.cgi?nvfoss"]The Undersigned[/url][/quote]I think this is relative because open source drivers from NVIDIA could mean that others could try to implement full XvMC support for PureVideo in them if NVIDIA does not want to do it themselves.
Open-Source Nvidia Drivers Petition (over 2500 people have signed up this far):

http://www.petitiononline.com/nvfoss/



To:  Nvidia Corp.

The world-wide community of Linux users requests that Nvidia Corp. releases

fully-functional open-source (BSD-licensed) versions of their binary device

drivers, as soon as possible.



At the moment, Nvidia has released its 3-D enabled driver as a binary object

file along with some C wrappers for compatibility, as well as a modified

version of SGI's OpenGL library. While this solution is the best one besides

having an open-source driver, it does have many problems:



1. It subjects X-Window or the entire system to a large number of crashes,

and hang-ups. This is while a system where the drivers are not loaded, works

perfectly for weeks on end. So, if Linux users want to enjoy 3-D games, they

often have to put up with uptimes that make Windows look very stable.



2. It taints the system with non-free kernel modules and libraries. This

prevents getting help from the vendor or from other kernel developers, who

refuse to debug a tainted kernel (and rightfully so).



3. The kernel upgrade process becomes more complicated, as the driver needs

to be re-compiled after the kernel is up, while X needs to be shut down, etc.



4. The build process of the drivers often breaks with some kernel upgrades,

and requires third-party patches. (or even crashes the system after compiling

cleanly - e.g: one page stacks).



5. They don't provide a solution for people who wish to use the cards on

different computer architectures than the ones that Nvidia provides drivers

for. For example, the users of PowerPCs cannot use the 3-D capability of

their cards.



6. There are many other technical problems that often surface.



7. The nvidia engineers that work on the drivers cannot be effectively reached

or contacted.



The current solution offered by Nvidia may be the second-best solution. But

this is one case where the second best solution is not good enough.



The response of the Nvidia engineers to this problem in

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/t253027.html was completely

unsatisfactory. They claimed that they cannot release open source drivers

because "We have lots of IP in our supported closed source Linux driver some

of which is licensed and cannot be open sourced.". Well, if Nvidia has

copyrighted code in its drivers, then they can surely invest some money

in hiring more developers to re-write it. They are a very profitable company,

after all.



So we request that an open-source driver will be released as soon as possible.

Meanwhile, we are going to collect a bounty for reverse-engineering the

Nvidia drivers and releasing an open-source driver based on this effort

(using the open-source Mesa library).







Sincerely,



The Undersigned
I think this is relative because open source drivers from NVIDIA could mean that others could try to implement full XvMC support for PureVideo in them if NVIDIA does not want to do it themselves.

#6
Posted 05/22/2007 02:03 PM   
NVIDIA Corp developers can get help if they want...

Linux Kernel Devs Offer Free Driver Development:
[url="http://linux.slashdot.org/linux/07/01/30/044203.shtml?tid=162"]http://linux.slashdot.org/linux/07/01/30/0...3.shtml?tid=162[/url]
follow up on above:
[url="http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php/id;58590129;fp;16;fpid;0"]http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php/id;...29;fp;16;fpid;0[/url]
Official website: [url="http://www.linuxdriverproject.org"]http://www.linuxdriverproject.org[/url]

Also see: [url="http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/"]http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/[/url]
(Nouveau - Open Source 3D acceleration for nVidia cards)
NVIDIA Corp developers can get help if they want...



Linux Kernel Devs Offer Free Driver Development:

http://linux.slashdot.org/linux/07/01/30/0...3.shtml?tid=162

follow up on above:

http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php/id;...29;fp;16;fpid;0

Official website: http://www.linuxdriverproject.org



Also see: http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/

(Nouveau - Open Source 3D acceleration for nVidia cards)

#7
Posted 05/28/2007 07:15 PM   
Simplest for the NVIDIA Corporation would be if they do something similar to what Intel did and hire/fund a proffesional company like [url="http://www.tungstengraphics.com/dev.htm"]Tungsten Graphics[/url] to help program open source device drivers for [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nouveau_%28graphics%29"]The Nouveau Project[/url]. [url="http://www.tungstengraphics.com/dev.htm"]Tungsten Graphics[/url] is a company who's Development Services Department specialize in among other things programming 2D and 3D display drivers for Linux, FreeBSD and Embedded Operating Systems. [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nouveau_%28graphics%29"]The Nouveau Project[/url] is a community project made up of of developers who are determened to write open source device drivers for all of NVIDIA graphic adapters which fully supports 3D hardware acceleration and all features that NVIDIA's closed source device drivers support, (today they are trying to do this via reverse-engineering which is not an effecive method when NVIDIA do not even provide detailed technical documentation/specification sufficient for independent developers to write open source drivers).

[url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphics_hardware_and_FOSS"]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphics_hardware_and_FOSS[/url]
[url="http://www.linuxsymposium.org/2006/linuxsymposium_procv1.pdf"]http://www.linuxsymposium.org/2006/linuxsymposium_procv1.pdf[/url]

What does it take to get the NVIDIA Corporation to take notice of the OSS community?

[url="http://www.tungstengraphics.com/tech.htm"]http://www.tungstengraphics.com/tech.htm[/url][quote][b]Intel OpenGL Drivers for Linux[/b]
Support for Intel's graphics driver was funded by Intel Corp. TG has created a driver suite that is fully supported and tested on the latest release of XFree86 and the X.org X server.

The Linux graphics driver is a unified driver supporting several graphics chipsets:
Intel 945G
Intel 915G/915GM
Intel 865G/GV
Intel 855GM/GME
Intel 852GM/GME
Intel 845G/GE/GL/GV
Intel 830MG

Source level support has been included in XFree86 4.3 and later, and X.org 6.8.2 and later.  Most Linux distributions should contain native Intel Graphics support.[/quote][quote]If your business has unique graphics needs,  TG will have the expertise you need.[/quote]
Simplest for the NVIDIA Corporation would be if they do something similar to what Intel did and hire/fund a proffesional company like Tungsten Graphics to help program open source device drivers for The Nouveau Project. Tungsten Graphics is a company who's Development Services Department specialize in among other things programming 2D and 3D display drivers for Linux, FreeBSD and Embedded Operating Systems. The Nouveau Project is a community project made up of of developers who are determened to write open source device drivers for all of NVIDIA graphic adapters which fully supports 3D hardware acceleration and all features that NVIDIA's closed source device drivers support, (today they are trying to do this via reverse-engineering which is not an effecive method when NVIDIA do not even provide detailed technical documentation/specification sufficient for independent developers to write open source drivers).



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphics_hardware_and_FOSS

http://www.linuxsymposium.org/2006/linuxsymposium_procv1.pdf



What does it take to get the NVIDIA Corporation to take notice of the OSS community?



http://www.tungstengraphics.com/tech.htm
Intel OpenGL Drivers for Linux

Support for Intel's graphics driver was funded by Intel Corp. TG has created a driver suite that is fully supported and tested on the latest release of XFree86 and the X.org X server.



The Linux graphics driver is a unified driver supporting several graphics chipsets:

Intel 945G

Intel 915G/915GM

Intel 865G/GV

Intel 855GM/GME

Intel 852GM/GME

Intel 845G/GE/GL/GV

Intel 830MG



Source level support has been included in XFree86 4.3 and later, and X.org 6.8.2 and later.  Most Linux distributions should contain native Intel Graphics support.
If your business has unique graphics needs,  TG will have the expertise you need.

#8
Posted 06/02/2007 08:39 AM   
Though not directly about NVIDIA still a couple of interesting and related articles:

ATI Has Open-Source Drivers Too
[url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=700&num=1"]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=700&num=1[/url]


The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux
[url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=735&num=1"]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=735&num=1[/url]
Though not directly about NVIDIA still a couple of interesting and related articles:



ATI Has Open-Source Drivers Too

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=700&num=1





The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=735&num=1

#9
Posted 06/05/2007 01:25 PM   
BUMP! AMD/ATI has now put some presure on NVIDIA by going out an publicly announced that AMD/ATI will from now on officialy do all it can to support the open source community in regards to open source device drivers, API, and SDK. AMD/ATI has begun this campaign by given out full specification (without NDA) for ATI R500 GPUs and above to the [url="http://www.x.org"]X.org[/url] driver developers, (and as I understand it they will also soon release the specifications for the R600 media decoder).

"[i]John Bridgman and Matthew Tippett are announcing AMD's open source plans, specifications without NDA. 2D very soon, 3D coming when the legal issues have been taken care of. Specs for the r3xx core will probably be coming later on down the track.[/i]"

[url="http://www.x.org/docs/AMD/"]http://www.x.org/docs/AMD/[/url]
[url="http://airlied.livejournal.com/50187.html"]http://airlied.livejournal.com/50187.html[/url]
[url="http://lwn.net/Articles/248227/"]http://lwn.net/Articles/248227/[/url]
[url="http://www.0xdeadbeef.com/weblog/?p=302"]http://www.0xdeadbeef.com/weblog/?p=302[/url]
[url="http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=10977"]http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=10977[/url]

it might take 6-months to a year before end-users see the big difference this will make but there is no doubt that soon both the open source and closed source binary drivers for AMD/ATI graphics chips will soon be better than todays NVIDIA respective device drivers.
BUMP! AMD/ATI has now put some presure on NVIDIA by going out an publicly announced that AMD/ATI will from now on officialy do all it can to support the open source community in regards to open source device drivers, API, and SDK. AMD/ATI has begun this campaign by given out full specification (without NDA) for ATI R500 GPUs and above to the X.org driver developers, (and as I understand it they will also soon release the specifications for the R600 media decoder).



"John Bridgman and Matthew Tippett are announcing AMD's open source plans, specifications without NDA. 2D very soon, 3D coming when the legal issues have been taken care of. Specs for the r3xx core will probably be coming later on down the track."



http://www.x.org/docs/AMD/

http://airlied.livejournal.com/50187.html

http://lwn.net/Articles/248227/

http://www.0xdeadbeef.com/weblog/?p=302

http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=10977



it might take 6-months to a year before end-users see the big difference this will make but there is no doubt that soon both the open source and closed source binary drivers for AMD/ATI graphics chips will soon be better than todays NVIDIA respective device drivers.

#10
Posted 09/17/2007 02:12 PM   
Turns out Intel is not far behind AMD/ATI in inbracing the open source development community and open source as a concept; On the third and final day of Fall IDF 2007, two keynotes were given which really drove home Intel's adoption of open community collaboration and social environments. See:
[url="http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/33993/118/"]http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/33993/118/[/url]
[url="http://whatif.intel.com"]http://whatif.intel.com[/url]
[url="http://softwarecommunity.intel.com"]http://softwarecommunity.intel.com[/url]
Turns out Intel is not far behind AMD/ATI in inbracing the open source development community and open source as a concept; On the third and final day of Fall IDF 2007, two keynotes were given which really drove home Intel's adoption of open community collaboration and social environments. See:

http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/33993/118/

http://whatif.intel.com

http://softwarecommunity.intel.com

#11
Posted 09/22/2007 04:46 PM   
Isnt this what we have been waiting for?
[quote]100.14.19 for Linux x86/x86-64 released
Fixed XvMC support on GeForce 7050 PV / NVIDIA nForce 630a GPUs with [b]PureVideo support.[/b]
[/quote]
:unsure:
Isnt this what we have been waiting for?

100.14.19 for Linux x86/x86-64 released

Fixed XvMC support on GeForce 7050 PV / NVIDIA nForce 630a GPUs with PureVideo support.



:unsure:

#12
Posted 10/02/2007 09:50 AM   
[quote name='FlappySocks' date='Oct 2 2007, 11:50 AM']Isnt this what we have been waiting for?[quote]100.14.19 for Linux x86/x86-64 released
Fixed XvMC support on GeForce 7050 PV / NVIDIA nForce 630a GPUs with PureVideo support.[/quote][/quote]No. Again, NVIDIA only support MPEG-2 for XvMC. We want MPEG-4 (MPEG-4 ASP = H.263, and MPEG-4 AVC = H.264) support.

FYI;
MPEG-2 is the video codec used in DVD-Video movies.
MPEG-4 ASP (H.263) is the video codec used by DivX and XviD.
MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) is the video codec used by HD DVD and Blu-ray movies.
[quote name='FlappySocks' date='Oct 2 2007, 11:50 AM']Isnt this what we have been waiting for?
100.14.19 for Linux x86/x86-64 released

Fixed XvMC support on GeForce 7050 PV / NVIDIA nForce 630a GPUs with PureVideo support.
No. Again, NVIDIA only support MPEG-2 for XvMC. We want MPEG-4 (MPEG-4 ASP = H.263, and MPEG-4 AVC = H.264) support.



FYI;

MPEG-2 is the video codec used in DVD-Video movies.

MPEG-4 ASP (H.263) is the video codec used by DivX and XviD.

MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) is the video codec used by HD DVD and Blu-ray movies.

#13
Posted 10/08/2007 01:34 PM   
A new video acceleration API for Linux/UNIX is currently being developed (to replace XvMC), in an effort lead by Intel. This new API supports more complete offload (VLD) as well as iDCT and MC, and can support acceleration of MPEG-4 ASP (H.263), MPEG-4 AVC H.264, VC-1 (WMV3), as well as MPEG-2.

The site for this effort is:
[url="http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/vaapi"]http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/vaapi[/url]

Maybe NVIDIA could join this effort, it is meant to become an new open standard.

[img]http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/vaapi?action=AttachFile&do=get&target=Linux_vaAPI.gif[/img]
A new video acceleration API for Linux/UNIX is currently being developed (to replace XvMC), in an effort lead by Intel. This new API supports more complete offload (VLD) as well as iDCT and MC, and can support acceleration of MPEG-4 ASP (H.263), MPEG-4 AVC H.264, VC-1 (WMV3), as well as MPEG-2.



The site for this effort is:

http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/vaapi



Maybe NVIDIA could join this effort, it is meant to become an new open standard.



Image

#14
Posted 10/08/2007 01:40 PM   
Looks like NVIDIA is trailing futher and futher behind AMD/ATI and Intel;

This is a quote from a [url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=955&num=1"]Phoronix news article[/url]:[quote][b]Future AMD GPUs To Be More Open-Source Friendly?[/b]

AMD is on the heels of releasing the next set of [url="http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=11655"]CPU programming documentation[/url] to aide in the development of the open-source R500/600 drivers ([url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=NjI1Nw"]xf86-video-ati[/url] and [url="http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=11058"]xf86-video-radeonhd[/url]). It's [url="http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7077#post21248"]already been discussed[/url] what this [url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=NjA0Ng"]NDA-free[/url] documentation release will have, but one of the questions that have repeatedly come up is if/when [b]AMD will release information on accelerated video playback[/b]. AMD's John Bridgman has now stated what they plan to release in the video realm as well as a new requirement for their future graphics processors: being open-source friendly while avoiding DRM.[/quote]
You can read the full story here:
[url="http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=955&num=1"]http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=955&num=1[/url]

...and NVIDIA is still sleeping /whistling.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':whistling:' />
Looks like NVIDIA is trailing futher and futher behind AMD/ATI and Intel;



This is a quote from a Phoronix news article:
Future AMD GPUs To Be More Open-Source Friendly?



AMD is on the heels of releasing the next set of CPU programming documentation to aide in the development of the open-source R500/600 drivers (xf86-video-ati and xf86-video-radeonhd). It's already been discussed what this NDA-free documentation release will have, but one of the questions that have repeatedly come up is if/when AMD will release information on accelerated video playback. AMD's John Bridgman has now stated what they plan to release in the video realm as well as a new requirement for their future graphics processors: being open-source friendly while avoiding DRM.


You can read the full story here:

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=955&num=1



...and NVIDIA is still sleeping /whistling.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':whistling:' />

#15
Posted 01/04/2008 08:51 PM   
  1 / 2    
Scroll To Top