How to enable temperature monitoring on Nvidia GeForce 6600 cards.
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[i][color="purple"]How to enable temperature monitoring on Nvidia GeForce 6600 cards[/color][/i]

[b]EDIT 8/21/06: I think the best days of this guide are behind it, but I thought I should let the few who will read this know that the server which was hosting the screenshots is long gone, and took the images with it. But I would hope you should be able to do this without pictures, otherwise you should probably stop reading this guide right... NOW![/b]

Have you ever wanted to know how hot your freshly overclocked GeForce 6600 was getting, but the card you bought doesn’t have a temperature sensor?

Well, good news! All GeForce 6600 cards have temperature sensors integrated into the core. Some card manufacturers choose not to enable them, supposedly to discourage overclocking. But with a simple BIOS mod you can enable the sensor.
[u][b]
[color="red"]Please follow these directions carefully. If you are not comfortable doing this, by all means, don’t! [/color]
[/b][/u]
[b][color="green"]Programs needed before continuing:[/color] [/b]

[url="http://download.sudhian.com/faq/kt7/downloads/Misc/drdflash.exe"]DRD Flash[/url] (Optional for Windows 98/ME users, [i]see Step 1[/i])
[url="http://www.mvktech.net/index.php?option=com_remository&Itemid=26&func=download&filecatid=859"]NvFlash V5.13[/url]
[url="http://www.fileboost.net/directory/development/editors/hextreme_hex_editor_for_windows/002238/1/download.html"]Hextreme[/url] (Any hex editor may be used, although doing so will make this guide a bit harder to follow.)
[url="http://www.winzip.com/downwz.htm"]Winzip[/url] (or any other utility that can decompress a .zip file.)

[color="blue"][b]Step 1: Create a boot disk that includes Nvflash [/b][/color]
[b][color="green"]
Windows 98/ME users:[/color][/b]

1. Go into “My Computer” Right-click on A: and select “Format” from the context menu.

2. Choose “Quick format” and select “Copy system files”, you now have a bootable floppy disk.

3. Unzip NvFlash

[b][i][color="red"]If using Stuffit: [/color][/i][/b]
Double-click on "nvFlashv513.zip". Open the folder called “nvFlashv513 - folder“ Drag Nvflash.exe and Cwsdpmi.exe onto the boot disk you’ve just created.
[b]
[i][color="red"]If using WinZip:[/color][/i][/b]
Just unzip "nvFlash513.zip" directly to drive A:
[color="green"][b]
Windows 2000/XP users:[/b][/color]

1. Insert a floppy disk into drive A:

2. Launch "drdflash.exe" and click “OK”, it will now write the boot disc image to the floppy.[color="red"] [i]Warning:[/i] All data on the floppy will be erased! [/color]

3. Unzip NvFlash

[b][i][color="red"]If using Stuffit: [/color][/i][/b]
Double-click on "nvFlashv513.zip". Open the folder called “nvFlashv513 - folder“ Drag Nvflash.exe and Cwsdpmi.exe onto the boot disk you’ve just created.
[b]
[i][color="red"]If using WinZip:[/color][/i][/b]
Just unzip "nvFlash513.zip" directly to drive A:

[color="blue"][b]Step 2: Save that BIOS![/color][/b]

1. With the floppy you created still in your drive, restart your computer and let it boot off of the floppy
[color="green"][i]
Note:[/i] [/color]If the computer just loads Windows like normal, you may need to go into your computers bios and set the floppy drive to be your first boot device. Consult your motherboards manual for more information.

2. Type “Nvflash –b biosback.rom” (without quotes) and hit ‘enter’.

3. Nvflash will now save your bios to the floppy.

4. When it’s done, remove the floppy and restart your computer.


[color="blue"][b]Step 3: Edit the BIOS[/color][/b]

1. If you haven’t already done so, unzip “hextreme.zip” and install the program by clicking on “HexSetup.exe”

2. Launch Hextreme (Start>Programs>Mikersoft>Hextreme>Hextreme)

3. Insert your boot disk once again.


4. Press Ctrl + O and browse to the floppy drive. You should find a file called “biosback.rom”, open it:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/open.gif[/img]

5. Search for “04031201”:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/SearchNum.gif[/img]

6. Make sure you are in Hex mode, click the drop down menu next to the binoculars and select “HEX”:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/SelectHex.gif[/img]

7. Right after “04031201” you should see “10 0A 01 11”:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/01000a.gif[/img]

8. Highlight the “10” in the string:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/10.gif[/img]

9. Change it to “00” (by pressing the zero key ONCE):
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/00.gif[/img]

It should now look like this:
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/000A0111.gif[/img]


6. Now save the edited bios to your floppy with a different name then the original (we want to keep the original intact incase something goes wrong).
To keep things simple, save it as “Biosmod.rom”.
[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/save_as.gif[/img]

[color="blue"]
[b]Step 4: Flash your card with the edited BIOS [/color][/b]

1. With the floppy you created still in your drive, restart your computer and let it boot off of the floppy.

2. Type "nvflash -5 -6 biosmod.rom” (without quotes) and hit ‘enter’.

[i]Note: [/i]You may receive a warning here, ignore it and press “Y.”


NvFlash will now flash your cards BIOS. When it’s done, remove the floppy and
restart your computer.


[img]http://www.myfilestash.com/userfiles/Symbios/nVTemp.gif[/img][b]
Congratulations, you’re done! You should now be able to monitor the temperature of your Nvidia GeForce 6600.[/b]



[i]
[color="gray"]
Special thanks to, [color="blue"]Mgaroz[/color] and [color="blue"]Falcon[/color] for helping out with this guide. And to [color="blue"]Livinglarge[/color] for giving me the idea to create one! [/color][/i]

[b][color="gray"][i]
Really discouraging disclaimer:

Do this at your own risk; we cannot be held responsible for anything that happens to your card and/or computer!
[/i][/color]
[/b]
How to enable temperature monitoring on Nvidia GeForce 6600 cards



EDIT 8/21/06: I think the best days of this guide are behind it, but I thought I should let the few who will read this know that the server which was hosting the screenshots is long gone, and took the images with it. But I would hope you should be able to do this without pictures, otherwise you should probably stop reading this guide right... NOW!



Have you ever wanted to know how hot your freshly overclocked GeForce 6600 was getting, but the card you bought doesn’t have a temperature sensor?



Well, good news! All GeForce 6600 cards have temperature sensors integrated into the core. Some card manufacturers choose not to enable them, supposedly to discourage overclocking. But with a simple BIOS mod you can enable the sensor.



Please follow these directions carefully. If you are not comfortable doing this, by all means, don’t!



Programs needed before continuing:



DRD Flash (Optional for Windows 98/ME users, see Step 1)

NvFlash V5.13

Hextreme (Any hex editor may be used, although doing so will make this guide a bit harder to follow.)

Winzip (or any other utility that can decompress a .zip file.)



Step 1: Create a boot disk that includes Nvflash



Windows 98/ME users:




1. Go into “My Computer” Right-click on A: and select “Format” from the context menu.



2. Choose “Quick format” and select “Copy system files”, you now have a bootable floppy disk.



3. Unzip NvFlash



If using Stuffit:

Double-click on "nvFlashv513.zip". Open the folder called “nvFlashv513 - folder“ Drag Nvflash.exe and Cwsdpmi.exe onto the boot disk you’ve just created.



If using WinZip:


Just unzip "nvFlash513.zip" directly to drive A:



Windows 2000/XP users:




1. Insert a floppy disk into drive A:



2. Launch "drdflash.exe" and click “OK”, it will now write the boot disc image to the floppy. Warning: All data on the floppy will be erased!



3. Unzip NvFlash



If using Stuffit:

Double-click on "nvFlashv513.zip". Open the folder called “nvFlashv513 - folder“ Drag Nvflash.exe and Cwsdpmi.exe onto the boot disk you’ve just created.



If using WinZip:


Just unzip "nvFlash513.zip" directly to drive A:



Step 2: Save that BIOS!



1. With the floppy you created still in your drive, restart your computer and let it boot off of the floppy



Note:
If the computer just loads Windows like normal, you may need to go into your computers bios and set the floppy drive to be your first boot device. Consult your motherboards manual for more information.



2. Type “Nvflash –b biosback.rom” (without quotes) and hit ‘enter’.



3. Nvflash will now save your bios to the floppy.



4. When it’s done, remove the floppy and restart your computer.





Step 3: Edit the BIOS



1. If you haven’t already done so, unzip “hextreme.zip” and install the program by clicking on “HexSetup.exe”



2. Launch Hextreme (Start>Programs>Mikersoft>Hextreme>Hextreme)



3. Insert your boot disk once again.





4. Press Ctrl + O and browse to the floppy drive. You should find a file called “biosback.rom”, open it:

Image



5. Search for “04031201”:

Image



6. Make sure you are in Hex mode, click the drop down menu next to the binoculars and select “HEX”:

Image



7. Right after “04031201” you should see “10 0A 01 11”:

Image



8. Highlight the “10” in the string:

Image



9. Change it to “00” (by pressing the zero key ONCE):

Image



It should now look like this:

Image





6. Now save the edited bios to your floppy with a different name then the original (we want to keep the original intact incase something goes wrong).

To keep things simple, save it as “Biosmod.rom”.

Image





Step 4: Flash your card with the edited BIOS



1. With the floppy you created still in your drive, restart your computer and let it boot off of the floppy.



2. Type "nvflash -5 -6 biosmod.rom” (without quotes) and hit ‘enter’.



Note: You may receive a warning here, ignore it and press “Y.”




NvFlash will now flash your cards BIOS. When it’s done, remove the floppy and

restart your computer.





Image

Congratulations, you’re done! You should now be able to monitor the temperature of your Nvidia GeForce 6600.












Special thanks to, Mgaroz and Falcon for helping out with this guide. And to Livinglarge for giving me the idea to create one!






Really discouraging disclaimer:



Do this at your own risk; we cannot be held responsible for anything that happens to your card and/or computer!

#1
Posted 02/20/2005 05:05 AM   
[b]Symbios[/b]
This is fantastic! Great work, I like the addition of the Pics.
This is a great post for anyone needing to do this. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

I am linking the thread to the Getting the card to work right thread.

By the way, these directions worked for me with my MSI card, and I even tossed in my 2cents worth to help edit a few things.
All the credit goes to Symbios for a great job, and some to Living large for inspiration and Mgaroz for being the ginnypig and contributing corrections. What does that mean for you the potential user? It means the proceedure works and is safe to do.

Thanks Symbios, you put a lot of work into this.
Symbios

This is fantastic! Great work, I like the addition of the Pics.

This is a great post for anyone needing to do this. /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' /> /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />



I am linking the thread to the Getting the card to work right thread.



By the way, these directions worked for me with my MSI card, and I even tossed in my 2cents worth to help edit a few things.

All the credit goes to Symbios for a great job, and some to Living large for inspiration and Mgaroz for being the ginnypig and contributing corrections. What does that mean for you the potential user? It means the proceedure works and is safe to do.



Thanks Symbios, you put a lot of work into this.

<b>******************************************

Stay right with God, one day you are going to meet Him!</b>



EVGA NF680i mobo, Intel C2Duo E6600 Overclocked to 3.420, cooled w/ Zalman LED 9700, 4 Gig Corsair Dominator DDR2 800,

Gigabyte SOC GTX 470, Western Digital RE3 1Tb X2

1000 W Kingwin, Lite-ON 12x Blu-Ray burner, Win 7/64 Ultra

(Modified) Sunbeam Transformer case [excellent cooling]

#2
Posted 02/26/2005 05:50 PM   
[quote name='FALCON' date='Feb 26 2005, 09:50 AM'][b]Symbios[/b]
This is fantastic!  Great work, I like the addition of the Pics.
This is a great post for anyone needing to do this.  /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />  /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />

I am linking the thread to the Getting the card to work right thread.
By the way, these directions worked for me.
Thanks
[right][post="19849"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right][/quote]



is there anyway to enable this option on a geforce FX5500??
[quote name='FALCON' date='Feb 26 2005, 09:50 AM']Symbios

This is fantastic!  Great work, I like the addition of the Pics.

This is a great post for anyone needing to do this.  /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />  /thumbup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbup:' />



I am linking the thread to the Getting the card to work right thread.

By the way, these directions worked for me.

Thanks

[post="19849"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]








is there anyway to enable this option on a geforce FX5500??

#3
Posted 02/27/2005 08:51 AM   
This is outstanding, thank you very much for the clear guide. I'm now temp monitoring all the way to the bank! :P
This is outstanding, thank you very much for the clear guide. I'm now temp monitoring all the way to the bank! :P

#4
Posted 03/11/2005 02:51 PM   
Great guide.

On a side note, if you want to monitor temps while playing full-screen games, you need something that displays temperatures with history, such as RivaTuner. It uses a history style graph to display temps. That way, you can play your game, exit, and then check and see what your temps were while you were playing. If you simply exit and check the control panel the temps will have dropped before you get there - the results will not have much meaning.
Great guide.



On a side note, if you want to monitor temps while playing full-screen games, you need something that displays temperatures with history, such as RivaTuner. It uses a history style graph to display temps. That way, you can play your game, exit, and then check and see what your temps were while you were playing. If you simply exit and check the control panel the temps will have dropped before you get there - the results will not have much meaning.

#5
Posted 03/11/2005 07:21 PM   
[quote name='baugustine' date='Mar 11 2005, 02:21 PM']Great guide.

On a side note, if you want to monitor temps while playing full-screen games, you need something that displays temperatures with history, such as RivaTuner.  It uses a history style graph to display temps.  That way, you can play your game, exit, and then check and see what your temps were while you were playing.  If you simply exit and check the control panel the temps will have dropped before you get there - the results will not have much meaning.
[right][post="22396"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right][/quote]


I am afraid to do this on my Chaintech 6600 256MB ... what happens and what do i do in case it screws up?
[quote name='baugustine' date='Mar 11 2005, 02:21 PM']Great guide.



On a side note, if you want to monitor temps while playing full-screen games, you need something that displays temperatures with history, such as RivaTuner.  It uses a history style graph to display temps.  That way, you can play your game, exit, and then check and see what your temps were while you were playing.  If you simply exit and check the control panel the temps will have dropped before you get there - the results will not have much meaning.

[post="22396"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]






I am afraid to do this on my Chaintech 6600 256MB ... what happens and what do i do in case it screws up?

My computer:

AMDXP 1900+ 1.6Ghz
ASUS A7V133-VM Mini-atx mobo (4xAGP :|)
2x256(512)MB PC133 SDRAM
Chaintech Geforce 6600 256MB... WHY WONT IT WORK

#6
Posted 03/12/2005 12:48 AM   
nothing ventured - nothing gained...
nothing ventured - nothing gained...

#7
Posted 03/12/2005 05:33 AM   
wow man that is alot!
i get 49 temp
[img]http://img120.exs.cx/img120/4868/picture5vw.jpg[/img]
hmm how come u dont have ambient temp and i do?
wow man that is alot!

i get 49 temp

Image

hmm how come u dont have ambient temp and i do?

CPU: i7-2600 PSU: 750W

RAM: 8GB kingston Mobo: Asus p8p67 B3

GFX: Gigabyte GTX 570 SLI

#8
Posted 03/12/2005 06:54 AM   
[quote name='S.W.A.T.' date='Mar 12 2005, 01:54 AM']wow man that is alot!
i get 49 temp
[img]http://img120.exs.cx/img120/4868/picture5vw.jpg[/img]
hmm how come u dont have ambient temp and i do?
[right][post="22535"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post][/right][/quote]

Who knows, who cares :D.
[quote name='S.W.A.T.' date='Mar 12 2005, 01:54 AM']wow man that is alot!

i get 49 temp

Image

hmm how come u dont have ambient temp and i do?

[post="22535"]<{POST_SNAPBACK}>[/post]




Who knows, who cares :D.

My computer:

AMDXP 1900+ 1.6Ghz
ASUS A7V133-VM Mini-atx mobo (4xAGP :|)
2x256(512)MB PC133 SDRAM
Chaintech Geforce 6600 256MB... WHY WONT IT WORK

#9
Posted 03/12/2005 04:38 PM   
Nepluto
"Will this work on other cards?"
There are two things you will need to find out:
First of all, is there a sensor built into the chip set that is simply not activated by the BIOS? This is the case with the 6600GT.
Secondly, if the capacity is there, you'll need to find out EXACTLY where and what numbers in the video BIOS need changed. The above information is specifically for the 6600GT.
[u]If you know what numbers to change and where to find them[/u], then the procedure itself will be the same.

Knowyourenemy
It is okay to know your enemy (your question anticipates confrontation of an unknown kind if you do this).
[b]First of all, you have a backup [/b]of your original video BIOS.
[b]Secondly, you can cut and paste the wording of the directions into a word processor, then print it out to have it to look at.[/b] (You can also copy the pictures into a word processor.)
Thirdly, these directions are ultra clear, accurate, illustrated, and provide a logical, step-by-step guide. Symbios did a good job here for the community, and others helped him to edit them. These directions have been field tested numerous times, they work.

If you can't follow these, then you are dumber than a rock, and should definitely not try it. :mellow: [i]I do not believe this is the case for you.[/i] Have some confidence in yourself. I expect to see a post on here acknowledging your success at this procedure.
Nepluto

"Will this work on other cards?"

There are two things you will need to find out:

First of all, is there a sensor built into the chip set that is simply not activated by the BIOS? This is the case with the 6600GT.

Secondly, if the capacity is there, you'll need to find out EXACTLY where and what numbers in the video BIOS need changed. The above information is specifically for the 6600GT.

If you know what numbers to change and where to find them, then the procedure itself will be the same.



Knowyourenemy

It is okay to know your enemy (your question anticipates confrontation of an unknown kind if you do this).

First of all, you have a backup of your original video BIOS.

Secondly, you can cut and paste the wording of the directions into a word processor, then print it out to have it to look at. (You can also copy the pictures into a word processor.)

Thirdly, these directions are ultra clear, accurate, illustrated, and provide a logical, step-by-step guide. Symbios did a good job here for the community, and others helped him to edit them. These directions have been field tested numerous times, they work.



If you can't follow these, then you are dumber than a rock, and should definitely not try it. :mellow: I do not believe this is the case for you. Have some confidence in yourself. I expect to see a post on here acknowledging your success at this procedure.

<b>******************************************

Stay right with God, one day you are going to meet Him!</b>



EVGA NF680i mobo, Intel C2Duo E6600 Overclocked to 3.420, cooled w/ Zalman LED 9700, 4 Gig Corsair Dominator DDR2 800,

Gigabyte SOC GTX 470, Western Digital RE3 1Tb X2

1000 W Kingwin, Lite-ON 12x Blu-Ray burner, Win 7/64 Ultra

(Modified) Sunbeam Transformer case [excellent cooling]

#10
Posted 03/12/2005 05:28 PM   
Hi,very good guide Symbios.I have do it to my club 3d 6600gt and i have activated the temperature monitoring for the gpu.Is there anyway to activated the ambient temperature?Thanks
Hi,very good guide Symbios.I have do it to my club 3d 6600gt and i have activated the temperature monitoring for the gpu.Is there anyway to activated the ambient temperature?Thanks

#11
Posted 03/12/2005 10:59 PM   
Edit: Got it to work, Temps are 44 C Great Job:)
Edit: Got it to work, Temps are 44 C Great Job:)

#12
Posted 03/23/2005 08:56 AM   
I'll give it a try if I ever get a WORKING 6600!!!! (RAWWWWWWWWWR) *Throws bricks and shoots guns at Chaintech*
I'll give it a try if I ever get a WORKING 6600!!!! (RAWWWWWWWWWR) *Throws bricks and shoots guns at Chaintech*

My computer:

AMDXP 1900+ 1.6Ghz
ASUS A7V133-VM Mini-atx mobo (4xAGP :|)
2x256(512)MB PC133 SDRAM
Chaintech Geforce 6600 256MB... WHY WONT IT WORK

#13
Posted 03/26/2005 02:09 PM   
Just wanted to add my thanks to SymBios for this guide. I'm now happily monitoring my GPU temp...

I get 54 degrees idle temp sustained. Isn't that a bit high? (using the 71.22 drivers).

I also DON'T have the ambient temp so I dunno what's up with that.
Just wanted to add my thanks to SymBios for this guide. I'm now happily monitoring my GPU temp...



I get 54 degrees idle temp sustained. Isn't that a bit high? (using the 71.22 drivers).



I also DON'T have the ambient temp so I dunno what's up with that.

#14
Posted 03/26/2005 07:39 PM   
The ambient temp might have something to do with the driver or INF.
Has anybody tried the 71.84 drivers from [url="http://download.laptopvideo2go.com/drivers/7184.exe"]here[/url] with [url="http://laptopvideo2go.com/infs/7184inf/nv4_disp.inf"]this[/url] INF?
Hmmm, seems he has disabled direct linking, well download the 71.84 drivers and the first moddified INF listed, and give it a shot.
Anyway, this guide is very nice! /thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />

Bill
The ambient temp might have something to do with the driver or INF.

Has anybody tried the 71.84 drivers from here with this INF?

Hmmm, seems he has disabled direct linking, well download the 71.84 drivers and the first moddified INF listed, and give it a shot.

Anyway, this guide is very nice! /thumbsup.gif' class='bbc_emoticon' alt=':thumbsup:' />



Bill

AsRock Z77 Extreme 3 with i5-3570k
Dual EVGA GTX 760 4 GB in SLI. 32 GB System RAM
5100x2560 LCD setup that I cannot use in Surround because Nvidia won't support Display Port properly. (as of GTX 700 series, running 3600x1920 till future upgrade)

#15
Posted 03/26/2005 09:45 PM   
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